65 Bathroom Wall Mount Sinks Design Photos And Ideas

A comfortable bathroom is a key source of tranquility in your home. Whether sleek and minimal or bursting with colorful tiles, a curated modern bathroom impresses residents and guests alike. Find inspiration to create your own personal oasis with these projects featuring popular counter materials like marble, quartz, and wood; flooring options like ceramic, hardwood, and concrete; and a huge variety of sink, tub, and shower options.

Minimal Modern Addition

Sebastian and Tanja DiGrande's quest for natural light and open, modern design led them to Klopf Architecture in San Francisco. Working hand-in-hand with homeowner/designer Tanja DiGrande, Klopf collaborated on a modern addition to the rear of a traditional-style home. The idea was to depart from the original style completely to draw a distinction between the original house and any later additions, as well as observe a very minimal, clean, gallery-like modern style against which changing daylight, art, furniture, and of course the people provide the color and motion.

With its dark gray stuccoed walls, dark steel railing, and floor-to-ceiling windows, the exterior of the addition is at the same time an open, modern box as well as a receding volume that acts almost as a backdrop for the house, receding visually out of respect for the original home. From the interior, windows bring in nature and views from all around the lush property. They also allow views of the original house. Up on the roof deck the views magnify. The owners use a boom and crank to bring up food and drinks when entertaining!

Inside, the simple clean-lined spaces showcase the couple’s minimal, modern taste. The open bathroom epitomizes the clean, minimal style of the addition. On the exterior, steel elements bring a more industrial modern feeling to the addition from the rear.
Minimal Modern Addition

Sebastian and Tanja DiGrande's quest for natural light and open, modern design led them to Klopf Architecture in San Francisco. Working hand-in-hand with homeowner/designer Tanja DiGrande, Klopf collaborated on a modern addition to the rear of a traditional-style home. The idea was to depart from the original style completely to draw a distinction between the original house and any later additions, as well as observe a very minimal, clean, gallery-like modern style against which changing daylight, art, furniture, and of course the people provide the color and motion.

With its dark gray stuccoed walls, dark steel railing, and floor-to-ceiling windows, the exterior of the addition is at the same time an open, modern box as well as a receding volume that acts almost as a backdrop for the house, receding visually out of respect for the original home. From the interior, windows bring in nature and views from all around the lush property. They also allow views of the original house. Up on the roof deck the views magnify. The owners use a boom and crank to bring up food and drinks when entertaining!

Inside, the simple clean-lined spaces showcase the couple’s minimal, modern taste. The open bathroom epitomizes the clean, minimal style of the addition. On the exterior, steel elements bring a more industrial modern feeling to the addition from the rear.
The mosaic wall uses tiles from Appiani.
The bathroom includes a stainless steel-and-aluminum Vipp bath module with integrated sink, faucet, and Corian countertop; Vipp spot lamp; glass-walled shower with a complete set of Vipp bathroom accessories; towels; and a Duravit toilet.
Powder room with borrowed light from glass ceiling over hung wall sink
In the guest bathroom, Givone installed a hand-chiseled sink made of 17th-century marble quarried from the hills outside of Rome.
Rather than concealing the barn frame in the private rooms, Cohen created an interplay between modern and historic elements in the master bathroom.
A modular shelf system by Alu provides a more sculptural take on the classic bathroom vanity in this Toronto home.
In the bathroom, the Stylo bar by Alu eliminates the need for space-eating cabinets by creating a vertical tower of platforms on which all the hygienic essentials rest. Generally used in retail displays, the Stylo stretches from floor to ceiling; platforms branch off at various intervals, creating resting spots for toilet paper, shaving gear, toothpaste, soap, and other necessities. The tub is built up from a rubberized plaster by Miracote and finished off with a woven fabric mesh and final layer of All-in-One coating, popular in prisons for its low price and durability.
Carbone preserved many of the home’s original bones while replacing the roof and plumbing and shoring up the structure. The interior spaces, too, mix new and old. Allegranti found many of the furnishings and fixtures in nearby markets, including the antique doors used in his bathroom and closet.
The private bathroom features a wetroom style open enclsoure, linear drain,Quartzite tile, and a concealed mirrored medicine cabinet. The fixtures are by Fantini.
Sayes designed a pegboard screen to hide a bathtub and wash basin in the downstairs bathroom, and used the same shade of salmon-hued paint from Resene on the ceiling in the master bedroom. Sayes fashioned the pendant lamp from common parts, including a ceramic socket and a G125 incandescent lightbulb.
En-suit classic-European espired bathroom
Natural materials connect the master bath with the setting.  A sunken tub within the floor provides the perfect retreat.
The architect covered the exterior in Pac-Clad, a metal roofing material, because it's "cost-effective, durable, maintenance-free, and comes in various colors," says Church.
The second-floor bathroom's colorful Tex tiles from Mutina sport an array of different textures for a unique tactile experience.
White-and-blue, wood-grain–patterned UonUon tiles by 14oraitaliana line the bathroom walls in a loft above the garage.
Breakfast Woodworks created the custom teak vanity in the master bathroom.
The entire bathroom is based on a grid, informed by Brigham’s background in graphic design. The 4” redwood slats form the base measurement; the height of the sink, the bath, and all other features are built in multiples of four. Each piece was designed to either project from or recess back into the wall, continuing seamlessly into the next fixture. Everything from the medicine cabinet to the planters floats off the ground, opening the space.
In order to give the redesign a seamless feel, Brigham and Archuleta carried the use of wood throughout the room—including the shower. Archuleta researched types of wood that can withstand a high-moisture environment, and the most visually appealing was coastal redwood. He came across an unlikely source of reclaimed redwood: old pickling vats from a company called Trestlewood. 

Experience in working with reclaimed wood taught Archuleta that “wood that’s been exposed to liquid for long periods of time pulls in minerals that it wouldn't naturally have access to in its living state.” In this case, the iron bands and nails that held the barrels together reacted with the pickling liquid, leaving behind a rich, dark patina.
Renovating the old mill was a family effort, and Blee called on his sister Kate, a textile designer based in London, to lend a helping hand with the tile work. Kate's repertoire also extends to building installations, including a ceramic wall in the City and Islington Center for Lifelong Learning in North London. "She had several boxes left over," Blee recalls, "which meant another opportunity to use something that was lying around." The tiles, with finishes ranging from heavy glazes to matte coats, offered textural variety, which brother and sister used to "play around with the idea of reflection from the roof light."
The marble continues in a bathroom, which has a Palomba sink from Laufen.
Kids' Bathroom
Kids' Bathroom
Bathroom
Bathroom Shower
Powder Room
Robertson--with the help of developers Katie Nichols and John Walker, who were heavily involved in the design process--finished the guest bathroom with Modwalls tiles and a sink they found on eBay. They used a piece of marine plywood, leftover from building the front-porch steps, to create a counter on which the sink could sit--and where the family can rest their toothbrushes. To the right of the sink is a Toto dual-flush toilet, which is great for conserving water but has proven problematic for toilet training, as American potty seats aren't designed to fit these Japanese basins.
An en-suite bathroom, walk-in closet, and window seat complete the bedroom. A bridge leads to a guest room, a family bathroom, and two linked children's bedrooms.
Benjamin Moore’s “Mountain Peak White” coats the western red cedar walls in the master bathroom, which is detailed with the same Carrara marble countertop seen in the kitchen. Waterworks tile covers the floor, and an Agape tub stands across from a vanity light fixture custom-made by the firm’s interior designer, Erin Martin.
The master bathroom is softly lit by a skylight. The bath, by Laufen, is sunk into the floor to maintain a feeling of space.
The bathroom, located just adjacent to the kitchen, features a pattern of gray and turquoise tiles that climbs from the floors up the walls. They serve as a burst of color among the predominately white walls elsewhere, transforming the bathroom into one of the apartment’s most striking spaces.
Though we love the custom teak-and-steel sink, shelving, shower caddy, mirror, shower, and vanity by Pat Carson Studio, the real coup of this bathroom is that the window at left goes from transparent to opaque with the touch of a button. The Duo Poliert dispensers beneath the shelf are from Blomus. A toilet opposite the sink is from Toto.
In the serene upstairs bathroom, Kennon paired Chinese Bluestone floors from Defazio with white ceramic wall tiles from local supplier Classic Ceramics. The tub is by Bette with a Roger Seller faucet, while the bathroom sink is by Argent with a Grohe faucet.
In the bathroom, plywood cabinets by Doug Chamblin support a concrete countertop Stern designed himself. A Toto toilet, Americh tub, Duravit sink, and Danze Parma faucet round out the space.
An airtight building envelop helps naturally insulate the structure. The appliances in the house are energy-efficient, and use greywater recycling.
Rich Veracruz marble lines one wall of the bathroom, black-and-white tiles of various sizes clad another.
The bathroom includes a sink Bornstein discovered in a secondhand store.
The focal point of the room is a glass fiber-reinforced concrete sink that weighs 460 pounds. The material is stronger then regular concrete, so the overall thickness of the sink is a mere two inches. By using GFRC, Archuleta was also able to create a more uniform surface with almost no pinholes—important both for maintaining the minimalistic appearance of the room and to avoid leaks in the areas that would be in direct contact with water. Concrete is also incorporated into the bathtub and shower bases.
In the tiled master bathroom, the boys get their own sink.
Everleigh Room
Dunbar describes the bathroom as an outside-in room because it has light, air, and sometimes, when it drizzles and the skylight left open, even rain. Designed for exactly these circumstances, a blue-glass mosaic tile floor is laid at an angle to drain with ease.
Along with historic wood and steel details, several warm brick walls were exhumed and left exposed.
"I put everything that I've always loved into this house," says Tyler—and that includes white tiles edged with gray grout in the bathroom, a design move previous clients had balked at.

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