26961 Home Design Ideas and Photos

The bathroom evokes the building’s industrial bones. The pendant light is from Ikea, and the towel racks are repurposed train car luggage racks. The Carrara tiles are mismatched seconds. “It works if you let yourself not try to fix it,” says Brandon.
In the guest bedroom, a painting by Monique Crine hangs on the original brick wall above a Miles & May bed and side table. The rug is from ABC Carpet & Home.
Brandon and Amy set up different workstations in the living area.
Beneath a recycled-wood ceiling and centered by a Bokhara rug, the living area contains furniture of their own design.
Among the couple’s cost-saving measures was outfitting the kitchen with their own custom cabinetry. The brick and windows are original, the Garland stove was a Craigslist find, and the floor tile was found on closeout at a cost of about $1 per square foot.
A 19th-century New York factory houses both Brandon and Amy Phillips’s apartment and the workshop for their company, Miles & May Furniture Works.
Norman Millar and Judith Sheine designed the built-ins in the living-dining area, which were made from vertical-grain Douglas fir. Vintage Dutch industrial chairs are arranged around a black walnut dining table that, like the madrone coffee table, is by Urban Hardwoods.
The guesthouse has similar built-ins and is outfitted with a reproduction rotating sconce by Serge Mouille and rugs by Stephanie Odegard.
Sea caves on the property forced the architects to split some of the living space into a 483-square-foot guesthouse.
Boi sconces, which David Weeks designed for Ralph Pucci, illuminate the bedroom. The area rug is by Stephanie Odegard.
The living room is furnished with vintage items, including a leather-and-chrome chair by Suekichi Uchida and a stacking stool by Florence Knoll.
Ramirez and his partner, Sarah Mason Williams, dine at a sequoia table by Redwood Burl next to a hulking juniper tree that they asked the architects to preserve as a centerpiece of the property.
In the ground floor apartment, "there are picture windows with operable awning [windows] below, which provide the cross ventilation," said Wiedemann.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
This large screened porch is a favorite destination of the homeowner. "She spends a lot of time on the screened porch because it straddles the meadow and the mountains," said Wiedemann. "And it's directly accessible from the living area and the kitchen."
Expansive windows on both sides of the open living area bring the outside in. Marvin doors, the Ultimate Swinging French door, flank the mahogany-wrapped fireplace and provide easy access to the screened porch.
"Although it looks like an inoperable window, these allow for ventilation," Wiedemann said of the glazing lining the kitchen and dining areas. The architects opted for Marvin Casement Venting units in custom-widths.
A view of the back side of the two-story home reveals its dramatic glazing, which provides both levels with far-flung views into the site.
The area includes a Wally planter from Woolly Pocket near the custom steel-and-glass doors.
Kartheiser's courtyard also includes a dry sauna with a ceiling made from 2,500 pieces of wood.
A curtain slides across for privacy.
When not in use as the headboard, the large redwood slab folds down to become a desk.
The bed is counterbalanced by a 300-pound weight.
“What often happens in our relationship is I come to Funn with an idea and he makes it into something livable.” —Vincent Kartheiser
“I believe that whenever you’re hiring an artist, and Funn is an artist, he’s going to do his best work if he’s trusted,” says Kartheiser.
He worked with Kartheiser’s existing appliances in the kitchen, trading the old cabinetry for new teak.
In the living area of actor Vincent Kartheiser’s Hollywood cabin, redesigned by Funn Roberts to maximize every last inch of space, an Eames lounge chair and ottoman mix with a couch and coffee table by Cisco Home from HD Buttercup. The table in the main room is from West Elm.
The bed was designed to hang from the ceiling and can be hoisted up and pulled down as needed.
Continues Rappe,
Large sliding doors allow the dining area to flow into the courtyard.
A stunning wall of windows creates a cloister-like feel adjacent to the main courtyard. The outdoor spaces
Walnut floors run throughout the home, creating a seamless transition between the living room and open kitchen.
Mirror by MAP for Sabi, $160

Not only is it irresistibly cute, Sabi’s mirror is also designed for universal use. Installation is a breeze: Punch out the to-scale template from the packaging and hang it with the included adhesive or easy-mount screw.
112 faucet and mixer series and Round series in-wall accessories by Arne Jacobsen for Vola, $860–$2,270

Arne Jacobsen designed his fixtures for Vola in 1968. In 2014, the Danish company added a deep copper finish to the line.
Photo by Anders Hviid
Metal details in the home transition to gradually darker tones as the spaces become increasingly private. In the guest bathroom, a solid brass bowl sink rests on top of a custom Corian base. White Dornbracht wall-mounted faucets sit below a custom mirror cabinet. In the bathroom and throughout the home, interior accents by Gunter & Co make elegant finishing touches.
Winged light bulbs, part of an Ingo Maurer fixture, bring levity to Hill's bathroom. The space features a zinc wall by Houston metalworker George Sacaris, who also did the bathroom and kitchen cabinets.
Montreal bathroom
The custom cedar tub, fabricated by Dovetail, elegantly fits into the master bathroom.
The leftmost cabinet above the Duravit bathtub (equipped with KWC fixtures) occupies the space where a doorway once lead into the living room, creating unnecessary traffic from the home’s public spaces through to the master bedroom.The new bathroom features a minimal palette of white and teak. “It’s able to hold up on boat decks so is good for a bathroom,” Klug says. It also makes the heated floor that much nicer to walk on in the morning.

Photo by 

Eric Roth
For the bathroom inside a renovated Hollywood bungalow, architect Noah Walker used a simple palette of gray and white tile, black countertops, and stainless steel fixtures. "I love minimal bathrooms with natural light, so less is more, and pay attention to the details," he advises.
The summer abode by night.
The back of the house is nearly a mirror image of the front—with just a few more windows to take in the views of the ocean.
Parallel to the sea, the pool adds to the resort-like ambiance of the home.
The living area keeps it cozy with plush seating and a fireplace, while remaining connected to the outdoors.
The entire home is encased in glass and soaked in natural light.
Clean lines and textures add to the monochromatic palette.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.