Dwell's Favorite Home Design Ideas and Photos

Martin and Katz plastered over the stucco finish of the fireplace wall with soft gray Venetian plaster.
The white kitchen is equipped with NEFF appliances as well as Caesarstone Snow and stainless-steel countertops.
Rolling Huts | Olson Kundig
Insta-House by MB Architects
In order to maintain privacy for both guests and homeowners, Oikos was designed with the strongest viewpoints in mind, capturing the best vistas while sheltering views back to the homestead.
Surrounded by boulders and twisted yuccas, these two cabins in the Mojave Desert stand like Monopoly houses, with their steel siding weathered to a tawny finish. But behind the simple gabled forms lies a complex network that enables them to operate wholly off the grid.
First built in 1959 as acclaimed architect Jim Olson's first project, this modest bunkhouse in the woods grew into an extraordinary family retreat.
Staying true to Airstream founder Wally Byam Credo’s mission "to provide a more satisfying, meaningful way of travel that offers complete travel independence, wherever and whenever you choose to go,
In ARCHITECTUREFIRM’s James River House, the 28-foot-long Series 600 Multi-Slide door is comprised of five 10-foot-tall panels of dual-paned, low-E glass, which helps keep the house warm during Virginia winters. All windows and doors feature thermally broken aluminum. “Western Window Systems,” says architect Danny MacNelly, “does a great aluminum product that isn’t very expensive. The details are minimal, clean, and refined.”
DZINE Concept did the interior design throughout. The dining room features a Liquid table by Baxter and Charme chairs from Busnelli.
The guesthouse has similar built-ins and is outfitted with a reproduction rotating sconce by Serge Mouille and rugs by Stephanie Odegard.
When not in use as the headboard, the large redwood slab folds down to become a desk.
“What often happens in our relationship is I come to Funn with an idea and he makes it into something livable.” —Vincent Kartheiser
Large sliding doors allow the dining area to flow into the courtyard.
Winged light bulbs, part of an Ingo Maurer fixture, bring levity to Hill's bathroom. The space features a zinc wall by Houston metalworker George Sacaris, who also did the bathroom and kitchen cabinets.
The custom cedar tub, fabricated by Dovetail, elegantly fits into the master bathroom.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
Project Name: Box Office
Cabin Knapphullet is small cabin inspired by its location nestled between large rocks and low vegetation of the Sandefjord coast in Norway. It is only 323 square feet, but contains an open living space with a bathroom and a mezzanine bed that sleeps two people. Although the building occupies a small footprint, the space expands vertically over four levels including a roof terrace.
The concept of this Scandinavian getaway was simple: To create a cabin that is small and sparse yet spatially rich. The 55-quare-meter (592-square-foot) cabin, commissioned by a private client and completed in 2016, comprises a large living room, bedroom, ski room, and small annex with a utility room. It functions off the water and electricity grids.
Sævik compares her house to a contemplative hideout. “It’s very quiet,” she says. “You can concentrate and let thoughts fly.” Her favorite summer pastimes include reading, painting, drawing, yoga, and “just sitting and feeling the forest,” she says.
The living spaces of house, built in 1972 or 1973, were originally divided into three—a kitchen, living and dining area, and an atrium (previous owners had covered the atrium with a roof). "The new owners wanted the interior space to flow as one, so we removed the glass doors and solid walls separating the enclosed atrium from the kitchen and living room," principal John Klopf says. "Some structural posts needed to remain to hold up the roof, but overall the space was opened up almost completely. The floor was leveled, and the plan freed up." The rainbow print is a 1960s Herman Miller trade poster, and the Vitamin Water print by a New York artist. A Sapien book tower from Design Within Reach sits next to the TV. The sofa is IKEA.
Cedar slats mark the facade of the Worple's lakefront vacation home in Ontario.
The living lounge, dining and kitchen are located within the larger of the two volumes.
Covered in mirrored glass that’s transparent when viewed from within, the façade of this Mexican forest retreat reflects the color, light, and movements of its natural surroundings.
Mirrored glass allows this holiday home in Mexico to blend in with it's woodland site.
Scott and Regina’s toolkit of electronics extends outdoors. A Sonos sound system is installed on the patio and a retractable sunshade from DeFauw Design protects the kitchen cabinets’ gray Tabu veneer from fading.
The low windows in the master bedroom focus the view on the backyard, not the neighbors. Christopher designed the solid poplar platform bed.
Located off of the kitchen, Vivi’s office disappears behind sliding walls covered in black chalkboard paint from Behr.
Designers Christopher Robertson and Vivi Nguyen-Robertson conceived their house as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms: a low concrete wall, a concrete cube, and a boxclad in Siberian larch.
It took six weeks to build the formwork for the poured-concrete walls that make up the first floor. Inthe 

kitchen the floors are raw European white oak, the countertops are Capolavoro granite with a leather finish by Antolini, and the natural oak cabinets are by Varenna.
The sand-colored fascia of the roofline allows the palapa to appear more integrated in its environment, as does the stone wall facade, which blends in with the boulders.
Looking for master bedroom lighting ideas for a vaulted ceiling? Try this one, where a gaggle of Edison bulbs are suspended from a vaulted ceiling and drape over an exposed beam in this otherwise sparse bedroom.
The Backyard Lounge and Office is 330 square feet and features windows on all sides.
A sleek ceiling fan and matching accent lights blend into the dark wooden background in this tropical hideaway.
A palette of stone, concrete, and greenery greets guests at the home’s front entrance.
Large, dramatic openings bring transparency and contrast to the 10-inch-thick concrete facade, framing perspectival views of the landscape.
“Even when the Kirio system is not connected to the router, it’s constantly downloading information about energy usage.” —Tiffany Bowie, architect
Finished in white, the walls, the floors and ceiling are contrasted by only splashes of color from sparsely place furniture and framed artworks.
Taiwan apartment renovation by Hao Design includes a new floor with a wooden bridge-like corridor that connects a master bedroom to a walk-in wardrobe on the mezzanine level.
Named Atelierhouse, for contemporary art museum Museion as a temporary home for visiting artists and curators, Harry Thaler Studio employed wooden boxes on wheels fold open to reveal beds inside.
Olson Kundig's natural and warm architectural palette combines metal, wood, and concrete, set against the blues and greens of the lush surroundings and bay.
The charred cedar exterior gently basks in the Alaskan sun.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Transformer or beach hut? Positioned in a coastal erosion zone, this holiday retreat for a family of five is completely capable of being relocated. An oversized shutter allows for protection from the elements when not in use and opens to allow sun in during the winter or provide shade on hot summer days. Waikato, New Zealand. By Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
According to Remijnse, since the only direction they could build on the small site was up, they decided to add height with a gabled roof.
The Outward Bound cabins' steel frames lift the structures above a three-foot snowpack while supporting corrugated-steel "snow roofs."
The solar panels on the roof often get covered in a heavy layer of snow, but with periodic clearing, they are as effective during the sunny days of winter as they are during fairer weather.
NOEM, a Barcelona–based architecture firm, created a metal-clad house for a young client just outside Madrid. It’s raised 12 feet off the ground to offer better views of the landscape, lending it "the futuristic feeling that it just landed," says Pol Guiu, one of NOEM’s cofounders.
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named "Ufogel," which is a melding of the acronym UFO and "vogel," meaning bird in German.
In the open concept kitchen and family room, three islands break up the wide space and give lots of room for the family of ten. A table for 12 leads into a spacious, open and cozy living room.

The whole family pitches in at dinnertime around one of the free standing islands.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.

Dwell's favorite photos of modern homes and design ideas. From midcentury gems, prefabricated units, and eye-opening renovations, to shipping container construction and custom trailers and campers, these projects display the best from Dwell Magazine and submitted by the Dwell community. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.