397 Hallway Design Photos And Ideas - Page 4

Zecc Architecten transformed this old Catholic church in Utrecht, The Netherlands into a single family home while managing to work with its original character. Church benches were reintroduced in the dining area as seating and the stained glass illuminates the mostly-white interior with colors and history.
A perpendicular walkway leads right to the garage and laundry areas.
The hallway leading to the master bedroom is lined with an assortment of framed photos of family and friends and floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the verdant James River Valley.
Snower Restoration in Kansas City, Missouri
Wood envelops the home’s second story. The floor is made of Brazilian pine salvaged from a warehouse. The walls are also recycled boards, sourced from the ceiling of a conventillo, or tenement, in the La Boca neighborhood, and sliced into 12-inch-wide planks. The ceiling is made of ipe from the NET workshop. In the family room, cushions knit by Teresa’s mother, Griselda Sposari, sit on a Lennon armchair by NET.
On a concrete wall near the stairway off the main hallway hangs an artwork that depicts the children. Nick conceptualized the piece with painter Bryce Chisholm and artist Jeff Johnson, who did the custom neon work. The floor is also made from concrete.
An antique Japanese indigo tapestry hangs by a vintage Danish piano.
The red acrylic hallway.
Greene purchased the vintage George Nelson dining table and cane-back chairs together. “We assume they were originally a set, but there is no way to be sure,” he says. A pass-through fireplace from Regency Fires separates the dining platform from the living space.
Panoramic windows are sited at either end of the staircase. The metal-screen railing, punctured by small round apertures, continues alongside the perimeter of the terrace; it was fabricated by Tortoise Industries.
Simple passageways with polycarbonate glazing, wood framing, and polished concrete floors connect the structures.
The floors are covered in two-foot square Nextra Piombo tiles by Monocibec. A U-Turn chair designed by Niels Bendtsen echoes the crisp, sculptural qualities of the interior spaces.
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Sonoma Wine Country I
Curtiss describes the floor plan as “super efficient but with gracious moments.” Instead of maximizing room size, she ensured that shared spaces were adequately sized. In the upstairs hallway, that means two or three people can pass each other with relative ease.
A small room divider offers a place to hang Cathy’s painting Pelevision, which was inspired by her first trip to the island.
The multitude of windows along with the glass partitions in the house bring in enough natural light that there’s rarely any need for electrical lighting before nightfall.
Only a partial covering remains over the patio off the living and dining rooms. “It’s amazing how light and airy the house is now compared to how drab and dark it felt when we first moved in,” says Tyler, an art advisor. The three-ring planter is by Eric Trine.
Maira wallpaper from the 70s adorns the guest bathroom. When they knocked down several interior walls, Sawatzky and Flanders were left with tons of lath—the thin, irregular strips of softwood that provided the base for wall plaster. With the help of a demolition contractor, they sorted out the cleanest pieces to reuse. The couple clad the box on the second floor that contains their bathroom and closets with the lath, nail-gunning each piece to the walls.
A series of Radient sconces by RBW illuminates the third-floor landing with a subtle graphic pop.
The view from the master bedroom down the long cedar corridor into the living room is one of the home’s real pleasures.
A combination of sliding doors, strategically placed voids, and large indoor plantings create fluid boundaries between indoors and out. The interior courtyard garden—landscaped with tropical plants and volcanic sand—is visually accessible from nearly every room, including the dining and kitchenarea.
The interior walls are painted Regal by Benjamin Moore.
The designers sought to create an abundance of storage options—including narrow niches in the hallway, used to hold travel guides. As Di Stefano puts it: “When a client says, ‘I’ve filled allmy wardrobes and still have space left over,’ that means the mission is accomplished.”
The unusual layout of René Roupinian’s Upper West Side home is what initially attracted her to the space, but the three-level plan proved difficult to organize. In his first solo project as STADT Architecture, Christopher Kitterman used a palette of walnut and white to unify the apartment, which he filled with space-saving solutions. Near the entrance, a Goliath table from Resource Furniture can expand to seat up to 10.
In compact Brooklyn brownstones, every square foot must be treasured and used.  We re-purposed an old fireplace into a bookshelf.
A steel-and-glass stairway keeps things open. Structural steel contractor Russ Jones was a key player. “Wood is easily manipulated on site; you can push and shove it,” Hector says. “Steel is different. It requires a steel erection team.”
Pops of color and warm materials, like the sliding wooden barn doors from Simpson, provide a cozy contrast to the polished concrete floors throughout.
The entrance opens to the living area, in which an I-beam stands where the kitchen enclosure was. “It was really tight, so we wanted to push back the wall that was in front of the door,” Julien says. The couple traded the old carpet for terrazzo flooring. Julien found the test bomb at an antiques mall.
On the upstairs landing, Chris and Ben pause by an IC Railings system from Issaquah Cedar and Lumber.
Appleply Cabinets: Conner Millworks created the custom casework throughout the house. Although the residents initially considered solid hardwood, ApplePly composite with a walnut veneer proved to be a more sustainable alternative. The material, which is sealed with a matte-finish conversion varnish, appears in the kitchen, the bar area, and even the master and guest bathrooms.
A Leda lamp from David Weeks Studio graces a table.
Several types of wood were used to build the house, including red pine for the floors, white cedar for the porch, and black spruce for the siding.
Contractor John Richards built the earthen facade to take on the appearance of sedimentary rock, referencing drawings the residents made to show the range and depth of colors they desired.
Light passing through the perforated shutters animates the upstairs.
Austin, Texas
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
A red Cloche pendant by Newline complements the Fabrica de Mosaicos tile in the entryway.
Pato Branco, Brazil
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Each floor of the tower is about 160 square feet. Prior to the formal renovation, Sheryl added mosaic tile from Fired Earth in the entrance hall. The hanging lights are by  Industville and the high-back chair  is by Nigel Griffiths.
Architects Alan Organschi and Lisa Gray transformed the building in two phases: first the renovation of the original structure, completed in 2005, and then the prefab addition, finished in 2016.
New Haven, Connecticut
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
The lower level is distinguished by stained concrete flooring. In the hallway,  a Molded Plastic Chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller offers a place for the residents  to remove their coats and shoes.  The seat has an Eiffel base.
The second floor is a master bedroom, bathroom, and mechanical room, along with an open volume that fills the house with light from the Alumilex doors and windows. The paint is Distant Gray by Benjamin Moore.

More than a way to get from point A to point B, modern hallways are important transitional spaces that connect both rooms and people. A well-designed hallway maximizes our experience of moving between activities and stages of the day. The photos below showcase some outstanding examples with various flooring options from hardwood to concrete.

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