223 Dining Room Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The modern dining room is where the universal ritual of breaking bread brings us together. The projects below showcase elegant configurations and designs that encompass chairs and tables, bars and stools, lighting, flooring, and fireplaces.

Dining room
In Kathryn Tyler’s finished home, a palette of wood, concrete, and painted brick forms a neutral backdrop for vintage treasures, including a $30 dining table, $3 poster, and a set of 1950s Carl Jacobs Jason chairs she snagged on eBay for $400.
The dining room features a custom pendant by Aqua Creations above an Oregon black walnut table. Shoji doors made by Eric Franklin lead to the kitchen and hide a wet bar.
Kitchen and dining area from point of entry with coffee and drink service beyond
Dining area and kitchen beyond.  Service pods on the left create distinction between areas along the open plan
Dining and staircase to second floor
Color and material cues help Matthew navigate the house. Reclaimed wood from a local barn marks the dining room, which also features a table from BoConcept, a Graypants pendant lamp, and molded-fiberglass chairs by Charles and Ray Eames. In the living room, the color palette of the Design Within Reach sofa and built-in bookshelves was inspired by maple trees in fall. “That’s really what universal design is about: making it as stylish as anything you’d put in anyone else’s house, but having the ability for it to be accessible,” says Coplen.
The interior combines modern and more traditional elements, such as this oriental rug.
One of the Eames Molded Plastic chairs is lifted on a Kaboost base so that a child can eat at the dining table
Dining room
After gutting a Vermont Frames kit house, resident and designer Andrew Kotchen left its post-and-beam framework exposed. On the main floor , a metal console from a flea market faces a Wisteria stump stool. The Wishbone chairs are by Hans Wegner.
Sliding glass walls pocket into the exterior of the home, allowing the living space to be completely open to the lush vertical garden outside.
The living area incorporates wood, marble, and porcelain; a materials palette that is carried through throughout the home.
Giant sliding glass doors from Fleetwood connect the dining room to the atrium.
Table Cassina LC15 by Le Corbusier, Rival Chairs by Konstantin Grcic for Artek with Kvadrat fabric, bar cart by Rossana Orlandi,
Three furniture icons, in pairs, surround the dining room table: the Eames Side, Thonet No. 14, and Peter Opsvik Tripp Trapp chairs.
An abstract painting by Michael Young complements the glow of the dining room’s pine walls. A collapsible silicone lampshade by Swedish designers Form Us With Love for Muuto hangs above a Macek Furniture Company table.
The dining room features 1970s leather-and-brass dining chairs and a table concocted from a brass-and-silver base and a custom lacquered top. The cheerful blue paint enlivening the doorway is from Emery & Cie.
An industrial shelving unit holding Jones' library contrasts with the warm wood flooring and furniture in his dining room.
Peter and his wife, artist Olia Feshina, relax inside their apartment in New York’s Washington Heights.
The dining area’s aluminum window frame was custom cut onsite to wrap around  a corner.
The Lobby Reception space is adorned with mid-century modern pendant lighting, tropical wall graphics,  and color furnishings.
Dining Room
The pumpkin-orange Dordoni Halloween lamp is both UFO- and sun-like—a slightly humorous and cheering sight on a gray day in Holland. It was chosen, says Dedy, “simply because it says ‘welcome home.’”
Michele eats lunch in the kitchen; a view of the central hallway and master bedroom lays beyond. Three-year-old Maple slurps from a water bottle with Judith, five, at the dining table, also built by Jamie. The Arco armchairs are by Mario Bellino for Heller, and the Bubble lamp is by George Nelson for Herman Miller. The photograph series is by David Hilliard, titled "That Glorious Society Called Solitude."
The dining room table sits at one end of the main room, with an open view onto the rows of trees that extend out from two sides of the house. Natasha sets the table underneath a suspended fixture made by her mother, Naomi, out of a salvaged branch, crystal pieces, and strung bulbs.
Due to the tight budget, the fixtures and furnishings had to be a mix of high and low. Instead of a Saarinen Tulip table for the dining room, they found a similar style with matching chairs from Ikea, then hung a George Nelson lamp overhead.
The formal dining area, also on the top level of the home, features Mid-Century furniture and lighting.
In the dining area, a one-of-a-kind table with a reclaimed Carrara marble top by NET—themultidisciplinary design firm of architect Alejandro Sticotti, with whom Nicolas works—is surrounded by prototypes of the company’s Board chair. The family dog, China, sits on a floor made of travertine tiles.
On those rare sunny days the Segerholts might even forsake their Doble dining table by Montis for their green backyard.
The interior of developer Chris Sally's unit was also designed by El Dorado. The table is a hand-me-down from Sally’s parents, but the Marre Moerel light fixture is not. Sally’s fiancée, Julie Gibson, had doubts about the trademark Eldo Green they decided to paint the unit’s ceiling.
“The house really works well because we don’t have to sit in each other’s laps,” Mia says. A CH327 dining table and CH47 chairs by Hans Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn provide a gathering place on the first floor, lit by a vintage pendant and Gubi’s  Pedrera PD2 floor lamp.
David Zahle (who works at BIG), his wife Maria Rich, and their children moved into the Mountain Dwellings in 2008. Rich’s father made their dining table in the ’70s, and her mother made the wall-mounted shag rug during the same period.
A pair of matching Idea lights by Vesoi over a dining room table and chairs, both locally-made.
The design team enclosed the vestibule of the front entrance to offer an area in which everyone can remove shoes and coats. The dining area boasts a handmade pendant by The Light Factory in Baltimore, Maryland. The table is from Blu Dot; the chairs are from Ikea. The flooring is natural bamboo from Dyerich.
The decidedly modern dining and kitchen areas open to the backyard through a floor-to-ceiling steel-and-glass door, fabricated by Optimum Window. One of the owners’ favorite features of the home is the “ability to connect the inside to the outside seamlessly,” Bangia describes. The living area serves as “a place for the kids to dance or ride a skateboard, a casual space that reflects the way they live.”
Two green accent walls—one seen here in the dining room—are the only departures from the strategically white backdrop. Wierciński and team designed the dining table and its orange steel frame, along with the seating benches and wall-mounted seat backs. A Sticks pendant light from Nowodvorski illuminates the space.
Adding wood floors to the home proved to be a challenge, both in terms of approval and execution. Since the flat is located in a historic mansion block, the license to alter it was very strict. Once approved, floating oak parquet floors were installed above a high-performance acoustic system to offer sound insulation for the neighbor below. The open dining room exemplifies the clients’ wish for a “fun yet minimalist” home. A copper Habitat pendant lamp hangs above a solid oak dining table fabricated by INTERIOR-iD. A whimsical mustard sofa pops against the blue Tabu veneer wall.
The house's ceiling was hewn from Douglas fir, which gives off a warm glow. The rafters were designed to emulate the look of strong ceiling beams.
The large wraparound porch links the two main houses and two guest cabins, and is the site of many impromptu shared meals.
The living area is designed for entertaining. On sunny days, the glass walls slide back so it’s totally open. The semi-opaque screen can also be opened to catch the last rays of the setting sun. At night and in poor weather, the whole assembly closes up, the laminated sliding doors sealing out drafts and locking in the day’s warmth.

As is typical for a bach like this, the owners have used inexpensive furnishings; in this case, second-hand bar stools and generic paper shades.
The kitchen is the prime spot for observing the rest of the house: through the dining room and living room, out the glass doors and windows, across the patio, into the guest quarters, and out the back wall of glass to the fence that lines the back of the couple's property and is lit up at night. "You feel like the captain of the house in the kitchen," Freeman says.
For the dining room, Freeman and Feldmann swapped their tiny table for developer John Walker's larger one since he was moving into a smaller space. They topped it with a $12 pendant lamp from Ikea and finished the "room" with a counsel from West Elm.

Get a Daily Dose of Design

Sign up for the Dwell Daily Newsletter and never miss our new features, photos, home tours, stories, and more.