985 Exterior Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The atrium-style design perfectly integrates a sense of the outdoors throughout the home.
The atrium door at the front entry (on the right) is painted a light blue—the same accent color that has been used in the home's kitchen and bathroom.
Beautifully designed, these mobile structures are composed of high-quality materials at a more budget-friendly price, along with transportable, easy-to-assemble components.
The end elevation displays the shipping container structure and original doors.
All outposts are a two-hour drive (or less) from its respective city, without traffic.
Street view
Exterior view
“We wanted the exterior to be the artwork,” Ryan says.
"We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Craig Bassam of the house he shares with Scott Fellows. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.
As you ascend towards the roof, the house becomes increasingly transparent.
Even the rear facade is seamless—its door all but disappearing into the cedar cladding.
The facade achieves a notable sense of verticality for such a stout structure, with its stained-timber cladding aimed straight up toward the sky. The heavy, horizontal brick-work of the neighboring Georgian houses seems to imply aesthetic controversy, but in fact, during its short planning review, Reeve's house received letters of support from no fewer than five neighbors. The front gate opens onto a driveway, which in turn leads to a private patio around back.
Exterior shot of Haase home.
The front deck, invisible from the road, is an extension of the wood paneling in the main living space.
Durable Iroko timber—which when weathered, will match the color tone of the surrounding buildings—has been chosen as cladding for the internal courtyard elevations.
"The building is arranged on a 9.8-foot structural grid, which is expressed both internally and externally to give clarity and order to the composition," says Chapman from OB Architecture.
The simple building materials —brick, timber, off-white render, glass, and zinc— and the elevation of the house take its cue from Manor Court.
The design was a response to the homeowner’s request for a bright, modern, and sustainable, four-bedroom home. The clients wanted open-plan living areas, a direct relationship to the garden, and thresholds that blur the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
The two-story house is positioned adjacent to the massing of Manor Court so that the profile of its roof edge on the first and second floors align with the eaves and ridge of the property.
Fishbeyn and Wright love that their home is set in a natural landscape with an incredible mountain view.
The architects were looking to create a space that would reflect the client’s eclectic and playful sensibility, while also establishing a connection between the new living spaces and lush garden.
Although the house is perched on a high ridge, it sits modestly within the spectacular scenery.
The central, rectangular, concrete structure features expansive glazing which showcases the stunning scenery from every angle.
The backyard exterior view at night.
The elegant retreat combines contemplative spaces with a sense of drama.
Since the home is located in a Class D Seismic Zone, the architects have designed the home beyond code-required structural standards with concrete foundations, steel columns, and composite decking.
A break in the concrete facade reveals the front entrance, which is marked by a thin steel canopy and two chimneys.
To meld the building with the landscape, the architects expanded the aspen grove around the southern approach to the structure.
Miller House Front Facade
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
The glass-enclosed master bedroom floats above the corrugated, oxidized steel exterior.
The Red House, 2002.
Located in Orinda, California, a three-bedroom house by architect Greg Faulkner took its first aesthetic cue from a large oak tree on the site. Cor-Ten steel panels clad the exterior, while white oak offers a material counterpoint on the interior. A 12-foot-wide sliding pocket wall opens the living/dining area to a terrace with a Wave Chaise longue by Paola Lenti. The landscape design is by Thuilot Associates.
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Large clerestory windows face the street at the Higashibatas’ house in Tokyo, optimizing both privacy and natural light within.
Outdoor walkway to the master bedroom
Each Getaway cabin has a hot shower with bath products, and electric toilet, mini-kitchen, hearing, and either one or two queen beds with, fresh linens, and pillows.
During the winter, the family can slide the screens open to let in the winter sun, in summer they can close the screens to provide shade, while still maintaining views and breezes through the timber battens.
A corrugated metal roofing, pine walls stained a warm blonde hue, and an abundance of glass make this modern prefab feel much roomier than its 1,600-square-feet size.
A cross sectional view of the house.
An aerial view of the clean-lined, futuristic home.
A staircase and a ramp rise where the transverse structures meet the pool volume.
The walls and ceiling structure rest upon two longitudinal beams of the same length, which have been placed under the floor slab. The same four walls that support the ceiling extend past the floor slab to create the base level for the bedrooms on the south end of the house.
The concrete beams support four walls, while also extending beyond to create massive, 23-foot-long cantilevers at both ends of the structure. As a result, the profile of the home looks like the letter "H" in the horizontal position, levitating on a slope.
On the shores of Moose Lake, Wisconsin, the inspiration for Roger Scommegna’s Aperture House came from the $9.99 bottles of wine produced at his Signal Ridge Vineyard.
Three bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the first level. Each room can adapt to accommodate a varying number of occupants.
The house is split into three levels.
Exterior of Pink House from the street. The entryway is recessed to enhance the spatial notion of soild and void.
The clients' desire of a modern house that fit comfortably into the neighborhood was definitely met. A simple flat roof with a surrounding parapet keeps the height below the other two-story houses in the neighborhood. The simple exterior palette of stained cedar siding and Larch windows were all designed to allow the house to age gracefully over time.
Bach to the BeachWith authenticity and simplicity as their rallying cry, a Kiwi architect and his wife have built a modern beach house that puts a fresh spin on the local vernacular.
The housees that circle San Francisco's Buena Vista Park run the gamut from wedding-cake Victorian to Scandinavian modern. Architect Cass Calder Smith aimed to create a façade that contextually relates to the adjacent ornate ones yet is purely modern.
Cocoon9, based in New York City, takes a unique approach to prefab homes, offering a line of tiny modern homes with high-quality construction and finishes, smart technology, energy efficiencies, and versatile spaces that are ready for the modern market. Their models start at 160 square feet and go up to 480 square feet.
“We wanted to make a delicate mark on the landscape, without blending into it outright,” says Andersson.
Here's the cover image in all its glory. Van der Rohe's Farnsworth House is the essential glass house (sorry Philip J) and looks pretty spectacular in the snow. One wonders if those windows are double-paned though. Photo by Jason Schmidt.
Delta Shelter | Olson Kundig

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.