54 Exterior Flat Roofline Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
R128, Sobek’s family home (featured in Dwell’s May 2003 issue), is a groundbreaking example of green design with zero energy consumption, emissions, and waste.
Between the front and rear exteriors, over 800-square-feet of patio space extend the living areas into the outdoors. From this angle, the references to Florida cracker architecture are obvious. The sleeping quarters are connected via a central corridor and kitchen to the living space on the other end of the building, a modern interpretation of the classic dogtrot house.
Windows are punctuate the façades of the new cabins at unexpected but strategic locations in order to frame and maximize views.
The house that Fleetwood Fernandez Architects designed for contractor Mehran Taslimi and his wife, Laila, embraces its surroundings. “They wanted doors that they could just throw open,” designer Hunter Fleetwood says of the retractable wall system from Vitrocsa.
SIERRA LEONA
SIERRA LEONA
Combining a prefab steel super-structure with concrete walls and insulated metal panels, Anthrazit House in Santa Barbara was designed by architects Pamela and Hector Magnus and built in collaboration with EcoSteel.
This modern prefab shipping container home in  Germany was designed by Cologne-based studio LHVH Architekten.
Based in Sacramento, CA, TAYNR specializes in prefab homes built from shipping containers.
Architect Chris Pardo designed the Element 1 model for prefab builder Method Homes, cladding it in Cor-Ten steel and cedar. Pardo’s design “is the definition of simple, elegant, straightforward building,” resident Karen Kiest says.
When Abbie and Bill Burton hired Marmol Radziner to design their prefab weekend home, their two requests were “simple-simple, replaceable materials,” says Abbie—such as concrete floors (poured offsite in Marmol Radziner's factory) and metal panel siding—and “the ability to be indoors or outdoors with ease.” Deep overhangs provide shade and protection from rain, so the Burtons can leave their doors open year-round and hang out on their 70-foot-long deck even in inclement weather. They visit the house once a month, usually for a week at a time, with Vinnie and Stella, their rescue Bernese Mountain dogs. Their two adult children occasionally join them. The couple hopes to one day retire here.
The matte black exterior and floor-to-ceiling glass of Villa Överby sit flush on limestone slabs.
Project Name: Montebar Villa
Los Angeles–based design partners Taalman and Koch created this house in Pioneertown, California from prefabricated structural components, and included glass walls on which artists later applied surface graphics. Available for rent through Boutique Homes, this 1,100-square-foot house cost approximately $265,000 to build and is composed of a Bosch aluminum framing system and perforated steel decking roof. The interiors floor are equipped with radiant heating and cabinets were built out of Formica or plastic-laminated plywood.
“The transparency of the house is really quite wonderful,” says Grace Kim of the residence, now open to the lake view.
“Peter and I’ve got shockingly similar and far-reaching design inspirations. Our conversations would move easily from brutalism to driftwood 

to kachinas and then flow right back to something applicable to architecture. I can’t tell you how many times I will do that with a less-design-literate client and just get a blank stare!” —Architect Craig Steely
In order to save a Meiji-period machiya in Kyoto's Higashiyama District, four friends pooled together their resources and had the two-level townhouse renovated and transformed into Shimaya Stays—two beautifully simple apartments that are now available for rent.
These 20-foot shipping containers are repurposed into stunning luxurious hotel rooms.
Australia-based firm Contained specializes in transforming vessels that originally hauled heavy cargo all over the world into well-designed lodgings. The portable structures have the unique ability to travel almost anywhere. Each 20-foot container easily opens up, flips out, and unfolds into an individual hotel room that opens up to the surrounding landscape, wherever that may be.  
As the story goes, Contained directors Anatoly Mezhov and Irene Polo envisioned these as ephemeral accommodations placed where there were no previous options. Born out of their love of traveling, the idea was to create a portable hotel room for short stays that can be set up anywhere.
Experience the unique architectural heritage of Italy’s Apulia region at Brindisi Trulli, an ancient trullo that was transformed into a modern vacation rental home.  
If you’re traveling to Puglia in Italy, one of the most iconic sights are trulli (trullo is the singular), an ancient hut that's specific to the Itria Valley in the Apulia region of Southern Italy. Made with dry stone, trulli, which date back to medieval times, have an unmistakable conical roof that's shaped somewhat like a gnome’s hat.  
Through Boutique Homes, you can now rent a modernized trullo that's been cleverly restored to enhance its ancient architectural appeal, while providing a comfortable, contemporary shelter.
Custom river red gum sliding windows and australian cypress door.
Northern elevation; Australian Cypress, concrete, and river red gum.
The Brain is a 14,280 cubic-foot cinematic laboratory where the client, a filmmaker, can work out ideas. Physically, a garage—that neighborhood birthplace of invention—provides the conceptual model. The form is essentially a cast-in-place concrete box, intended to be a strong yet neutral background that provides complete flexibility to adapt the space at will. Inserted into the box along the north wall is a steel mezzanine. All interior structures are made using raw hot-rolled steel sheets. Photo by Marco Prozzo.
The architect and his team devised an armature on the back of the container that will eventually be covered with vines, concealing the AC and heating unit, the reservoir for graywater and the composting toilet outlet.
This family home near Joshua Tree National Park was built out of a Bosch aluminum framing system assembled with a perforated steel decking and glass walls to create a bedroom wing and a living wing organized around two courtyards.
“The first floor was about making something warm and woody that would blend into the natural environment,” architect Stephen Chung says of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home. “The second floor was a chance to experiment.”
The glass-enclosed master bedroom floats above the corrugated, oxidized steel exterior.
The iT House is an exploration of the couple's architectural ideas, built with the help of friends over many weekends away from Los Angeles. It brings the precise and the cool together with the wild and untamed.
"We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Craig Bassam of the house he shares with Scott Fellows. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.
“To be able to respect the ‘massiveness’ of the roof, making bigger windows would be wrong, because we would lose the character of the farm,” Wynants explains. “Therefore, I was looking for other ways to collect light. At this spot you had the big barn doors at both sides: This is the economical axis of the farm. This I kept, as my own design office is right under this volume. It keeps the sun out, so I have a splendid view when I’m working—I never need sun shades.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

Get a Daily Dose of Design

Sign up for the Dwell Daily Newsletter and never miss our new features, photos, home tours, stories, and more.