305 Exterior Flat Roofline Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The C6 is one of LivingHomes' most popular models. Coming in at 1,232 square feet, this LivingHome offers a comfortable living space for a relatively low cost.
In contrast to their former house that had been set on a flat, densely wooded lot, the clients picked a steeply sloped West Vancouver property with sweeping panoramic views.
The L-shaped upper floor culminates in a dramatically cantilevered master bedroom wing that's elevated high above the roofs of the neighboring houses.
A view of the guest house, which is included in the sale.
Weathered steel bars on the north windows provide shade and security. Their hard lines are softened by abundant greenery.
exterior/human element
twilight
NIGHT OUTSIDE VIEW OF MASTER BEDROOM
MAIN ENTRANCE
The garage, a walkway, a pool, and a sloping wall that supports the back of the house are embedded within the steep slope of the site.
"Local puzzolanic cement, commonly used for foundations, was used to give a reddish color to concrete to merge with the cliffs," explain the architects.
The upper volume reaches for the infinite view.
The house wraps itself around the historic tree while allowing the natural landscape to do the same around itself.
From the edge of the property the graceful entry and landscape gently slope around to a lower yard.
The entry portal shows itself to the public.
Neighborhood looks towards the site and house anchoring the landscape.
The stainless steel canopy fascia hides the rooftop photovoltaic solar panels.
An exterior view of the property.
South Facade at Twilight
Entry at Twilight Looking West
West Facade from Carport
Lower Courtyard at Bridge
The sleeping quarters take advantage of their location at the end of the wings.  They are private spaces with unobstructed views.
Set on a 7.7-acre lot, the 3,400-square-foot residence is both spacious and compact with a natural flagstone facade and black-stained cedar framing.
The south facade showcases the third level addition and new wood, metal and concrete cladding materials.
The facade features a clean and classic midcentury profile.
Thermoplastic Polyolefin (TPO) was installed for the flat roofs.
Vertical cast-in-place concrete walls break up the building's horizontal forms.
Set between massive oak trees, the home was sensitively placed to minimize site impact.
"The roof of the lower level becomes the terrace of the upper level, with unobstructed views to the south," says principal architect Robert Swatt.
Approached from above, the home blends into the landscape thanks to an expansive green roof that's set on SOPREMA elastomeric waterproofing membrane. In winter, the house is disguised under a blanket of snow.
The covered parking pad is supported by an exposed concrete volume with (unseen) built-in storage. The concrete also provides protection against water runoff from the mountain.
The roofs are made of corrugated aluminum, and the timber sidings used at the entrance are repeated on key ceiling planes.
"This distinctive sheltering shape is again expressed in the wrapped floor-wall-roof profile of the three wings, which—assembled together, one above the other—track the site as it slopes toward the water," says Philip Olmesdahl.
The owner wanted a cozy family escape with plenty of outdoor entertaining areas.
Glazed walls allow the interior living areas to be seamlessly connected to the outdoors.
"The wood establishes a very emphatic and directional rhythm that orders the project," says Eduardo Cadaval, one of the firm’s founders.
By creating lookouts in three different directions, residents are able to celebrate the home's unique natural setting no matter which room they are in.
The green roof makes the house look as if it’s camouflaged within its forest surroundings.
While the house was painted black to help it blend in with the landscape, the shrub-covered roof is the more prominent part of the overall design due to the verdant green surroundings.
The walls of the volumes are slightly extended to create sheltered outdoor decks.
Upcycled wood—sourced from fallen trees near the site—was used as part of the shrub-covered green roof.
Concrete was chosen as the primary material because of its high structural performance, low-maintenance, and how well it bridges the slope of the mountainous site.
The fourth floor takes the form of a complete white cube with no visible windows or apertures.
For this project, the architects have created a house that looks like a pavilion, in which several floors have neatly been hidden within the simple concrete "box" volume.
Windows of varying sizes punctuate the building, giving it a sculptural appearance.
The operable windows help let cooling breezes into the home—a necessity given the area's muggy tropical climate and the urban heat-island effect.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.