115 Exterior Flat Roofline Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The facade
The vi
A Corten steel sculpture designed by the plastic artist Nivaldo Tonon.
Daring volumetric distribution creates an intriguing, sculptural form.
The cavern-like space underneath the middle volume serves as a parking area.
The middle volume is the largest and most transparent of the three volumes.
Originally designed as a single story residence the home features clean lines and an indoor-outdoor connection.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
An exterior view of the International-style home.
Architect Joaquin Castillo blends inexpensive materials, the odd splurge, and a refined modernist sensibility to create an affordable weekend house for brothers Alfredo and Guillermo Oropeza. The facade is a juxtaposition of rough-hewn local stone, smooth concrete, glass, and steel—the material palette used throughout the structure.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
“The sun rises behind the house and heats up the concrete mass during the morning, and [comes] through the front of the house in the afternoon; if need be the radiant energy warms up the house when temperatures drop in the evening,” says Thorsteinsson. Thanks to the thoughtful process, the couple was able to leave out the air-conditioning, and the house’s under-floor radiant heating system has turned out to be almost superfluous.
"We created a bosque of ironwood (Olneya tesota), one of our most cherished indigenous tree species,” Debra explains.
A concrete box.
A shell of concrete in the desert
Storey calls this house the “Eel’s Nest,” after the narrow urban properties that go by that name in Japan. Its façade was originally going to be wood, but because of local building codes and the fact the building is built along the edge of the property line, the exterior had to be fireproof. Storey covered it with stucco instead. “I wanted it to look as rough as possible,” says the architect. “Since it’s such a small house, it needed to be tough-looking.”

The workshop at ground level measures less than 200 square feet, but is set up to accommodate any kind of woodworking or welding; when not in use, the architect parks his car inside.
The only residence in Oregon designed by Wright, the Gordon House was designed in 1957 for Evelyn and Conrad Gordon, and finished in 1963 (four years after Wright’s death). Originally located adjacent to the Willamette River near Wilsonville, the home is now located within the Oregon Garden, in Silverton, Oregon. An example of Wright's Usonian vision for America, when its 2001 owners planned to tear it down, the Frank Lloyd Wright Conservancy obtained a three-month reprieve to dismantle it and move it southeast of its original location. The house opened one year later and is the only publicly accessible Frank Lloyd Wright home in the Pacific Northwest.
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
Lightroom 1.0, a photography studio, is a freestanding structure on the property. “Together, they represent an autobiography of my career,” Carpenter says.
The house uses solar panels and water tanks to function off the grid. Its waste water is recycled and used for irrigation.
The cement exterior walls were painted in a dark color to blend in with the forest. Aluminum window frames add some texture to the facade.
Located on a steep site with limited suitable building ground, the firm decided to cantilever the home over the hillside, which has the effect of helping the structure blend in with the landscape.
Project Name: Dietert Ranch
Project Name: Santa Monica Prefab
Torcuato House Pavilion - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Torcuato House Pavilion - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
“Simple rectangular  volumes with simple details” is how designer Thomas Egidi describes the house he created for architect Carlos Dell’Acqua in Malibu. “I wanted to stress its horizontality,” Dell’Acqua notes. Inside the dwelling, which is entered via a bridge that pierces the 25-foot-high main facade, the view  opens up to a panorama of mountains and sea. Ipe flooring is used for the walkway and throughout the interior.
A long, narrow deck leads to a custom fire pit by the water’s edge, a nod to the blaze that swept the property in 2013. Tanner worked with Cordwell Lane builders to complete the project in eight months.

Tasmania, Australia
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Tasmania, Australia
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
North facade - the framed box
Ramirez and his partner, Sarah Mason Williams, dine at a sequoia table by Redwood Burl next to a hulking juniper tree that they asked the architects to preserve as a centerpiece of the property.
Street Entrance
Custom river red gum sliding windows and australian cypress door.
Northern elevation; Australian Cypress, concrete, and river red gum.
The Brain is a 14,280 cubic-foot cinematic laboratory where the client, a filmmaker, can work out ideas. Physically, a garage—that neighborhood birthplace of invention—provides the conceptual model. The form is essentially a cast-in-place concrete box, intended to be a strong yet neutral background that provides complete flexibility to adapt the space at will. Inserted into the box along the north wall is a steel mezzanine. All interior structures are made using raw hot-rolled steel sheets. Photo by Marco Prozzo.
Entry door, with visual cues of a stair and platform to welcome visitors and elevate them to the living level upon entry.
The living area floats atop a deeply recessed steel-reinforced concrete block structure.

Tasmania, Australia
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
The Younger family vacation home is a semi-modular structure made of wood, steel, glass, and precast concrete. It’s surrounded by Tasman gold gravel, which acts as  a buffer zone in case of a bushfire. A building-height LED light accentuates an exterior corner.

Tasmania, Australia
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Another 1956 tract house with a flat roof designed by Krisel.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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