149 Exterior Flat Roofline House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

New addition at rear of house framing the original house and interior areas
Fir slats on the wall and ceiling run through to the outdoors, visually expanding the space.
To deal with a Malibu site’s sharp incline, architect Bruce Bolander set the steel, concrete, and glass house on caissons. A deep wraparound porch nearly doubles the home’s living space and offers the ideal perch for outdoor dining and taking in spectacular views of the surrounding canyon. The garage serves as resident Dave Keffer’s home office.
Front house night view
Moonshine is beautifully set in an isolated spot in the English countryside outside of Bath. The dramatic juxtaposition of a stone gamekeeper's cottage and a modern timber framed addition gives the home a quaint, pastoral feel while capitalizing on the dramatic view of St. Catherine's Valley.
Rooftop Patio
Using insulted metal panels that were rejected from the construction of a tennis center nearby, this sustainable home in Kansas by Studio 804 was inspired by the prefab Lustron houses that were developed in the United States after World War II.
Josie’s tepee playhouse stands on a platform, where she and her friends erect sets for their theatrical productions.
Making use of the hilltop location, each window was planned to frame interesting vistas or to find the best sight lines around adjoining buildings.
Windchime at Entry
The rear of the house looks onto a lush backyard. The rough, industrial prefabricated concrete panels by the German manufacturer Syspro are the building blocks of the home.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
Paths from the house connect to nearby hiking trails for outdoor and wildlife experiences.
Snow buries scrub oak trees in front of the home's west elevation.
The home's deck is perched over a canyon full of wildlife and rugged vegetation.
Warm cedar siding contrasts the snow capped ridge on a bright Utah winter day.
All of the glazing along the house’s 95-foot-long western elevation can be opened to the out of doors.
White brick exterior of Goddard and Mandolene’s home post renovation.
In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
Working with architect Vincent James in the late 1990s, Coen and Partners were charged with integrating the 8,000-square-foot Type Variant House outside of Minneapolis into the ever-changing, lush wooded surroundings.
One view of the Finn Lofts' southwest corner includes a cut-out rain screen.
The house in the evening, with the main living space and basement illuminated. "It gets pretty windy here," Jamie says. "I have nightmares about the roof coming off like the lid of a can."
The driveway has a permeable surface.
A basic box that’s as tall as it is wide (28 feet) and 16 feet long, this Portland, Oregon house consists of rooms stacked vertically: an unfinished basement on the bottom, a kitchen-living area and a bathroom in the middle, and a bedroom on top, with the stairwell hinged onto the front of the home. The only interior doors are those to the bathroom, basement, and root cellar, leaving the rest of the space open and unfettered. At just 704 square feet, Katherine Bovee and Matt Kirkpatrick's home is a great lesson in making the most out of every inch. Click here to see the interior.
“Initially the design had the studios completely separated from the main house with a sort of breezeway in between,” says Stern, who ultimately decided to physically connect them in a way that evokes walking through the outdoors. “The studios and breezeway are separated from the main house with pocket doors to create privacy when needed, and allow it to function as a separate guest suite for overnight visitors.”
While the home’s simple, boxy forms starkly contrast with surrounding residences, its compact shape and modest scale help it fit into the traditional neighborhood without calling attention to itself. The house was built around a large birch tree, with dwarf fountain grass and porcupine grass planted in front. A weeping blue atlas cedar provides a focal point near the front door.
The larch rainscreen covering the second floor give the house a light appearance and also provides privacy. Though it's difficult for outsiders to look in, the openings between the slats of wood let the family sneak views to the outside.

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