184 Exterior Flat Roofline Green Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

Glass walls and large windows create an airy interior that feels connected to the outside.
The home’s entrance at night.
Plantings cover the terraces and flat roof of CBC House, creating space to entertain in the main area of the garden.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
A glazed section perfectly frames country views amidst the book-lined walls of the home’s sitting room. A mobile panel allows residents to modulate light and privacy as they please.
The home is set amidst the monumentality of the Swiss Alps.
The home extends along a natural ridge.
One of the home’s larch-clad volumes appears to float above the site.
A major challenge was dealing with arcane planning requirement that dictated the need for two off street parking spaces. Our solution was to design the front entry path that served as the second “parking” space and was then finished into entry path.
The floor to ceiling glass sliding doors opens the living spaces to the surrounding waterfront and landscape
The concrete slab roof was made from precast panel forms. "The main roof is also a roof garden completely free from infrastructures such as water tanks and solar panels, which are then located at the rear of the plot, taking advantage of its sloped section," says the firm.
The firm worked to provide as much outdoor access as possible, so the living spaces spill out onto a protected veranda, and a ladder climbs up to the green roof.
The site has beautiful views of a nature reserve at the edge of a stream.
Designed by Austin, Texas–based studio Andersson-Wise Architects, the 12,500-square-foot Stone Creek Camp is sited on a sloping hill whose topography guides visitors to discover the grounds slowly: from the gatehouse to the master house, main lodge, and guesthouse. The eco-friendly family retreat features a stacked wood facade that was built from fallen trees found on the site; a sod green roof that provides insulation; and stone, wood, windows, doors, and other construction materials sourced regionally.
The horizontal concrete assembly appears to hover gently above the landscape, touching only on supporting columns. Floor-to-ceiling glass provides transparency from outside to inside.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls maintain important view corridors for the occupants.
A "green line" extends out above the home’s volume and runs along the fold of the gabled roof.
Architect Richard Hammond and his wife, Daniela, a designer, saw their move to San José as a temporary adventure. But when they found an abandoned, partially built house on a beautiful sloping site, they decided to turn it into their dream home, putting down more permanent roots in the process.
A series of open and closed volumes, the house incorporates a range of materials, including local mahogany, standing-seam metal, shingled glass, and concrete. A green roof tops one end.
The barrel-vaulted roofs that top the bedroom wing and the living areas help collect rainwater into the underground cistern and "create a new topography."
"The house portrays a dual condition reflected in the materials: brick on the outside, and concrete and wood on the inside," says architect Fernanda Canales. "The red color and the rough texture of broken brick on the outside accentuate a completely different condition than the smooth and neutral interior."
Located on a relatively flat and remote 2.5-acre plot, Casa Terreno occupies two temperate zones (forest and prairie) on a sparsely populated mountain in Valle de Bravo, Mexico.
The U-shaped plan of Music Box Residence by Scott Edwards Architecture has large volumes on both sides with a glassy two-story entry space in the middle. A long bridge, with a bamboo forest below, leads from the sidewalk to the main entry. The exterior is clad in black stained siding reminiscent of sho-sugi ban in order to pay homage to the family's Japanese ancestry.
A Haiku L Series ceiling fan and Stuv 30 Rotating Fireplace are ready for warm or cold weather.
The boathouse has a green roof and corrugated metal siding.
In order to achieve a contemporary exterior while still keeping a feeling of warmth, Martin Gomez Arquitectos chose to use dark metal, black flagstone, and lapacho wood as cladding.
"By reversing the shape of the land and the house, we wanted to think about the relationship between house and nature and notion of form," said the firm.
The home's lower level is submerged in the hillside. The three bedrooms on the upper level have access to the roof terrace.
The 2,026-square-foot house is split into two structures, with an underground garage separating the two halves.
The city and its various parts can be seen as a music score, the edifices acting as notes played by different instruments simultaneously. Gentle Genius is born in a disrupted part of the city, aiming to generate awareness of the critical current condition.
The black-stained wood siding of the Crossfield St House references London’s timber-clad houses from the 17th and 18th centuries.
On the green roof, guests enjoy stunning panoramic views, a hydromassage pool, and a lounge area.
Set on a steep slope, the building features angled geometry that mimics the mountains and terrain.
The Continuous Extension exterior is defined by coarse spray plaster, large floor-to-ceiling windows, and larch banding.
The master suite on the second level features a terrace and a lofted area.
The home's signature shiny exterior is composed of energy-efficient insulating concrete forms.
Drawing upon solar efficiency studies, the architects designed deep eaves to shelter the large expanses of glass.
The upper floor is wrapped in glass, with the exception of the solid wood front door and the cantilevering roof.
The 4,600-square-foot home is set on bucolic farmland.
The home's two volumes are distinct not only in their orientation, but also in their materiality. The lower level is wrapped in stone, while the upper level is composed of glass.
The new home is composed of two rectangular volumes stacked on top of each other.
The spa building behind the pool is topped by a green roof.
Exterior drone axonometric
Exterior within Context
Ivy plants wrap along the open grills on the top floor, and spill over from the windows of the first floor to create a vibrant green facade. The home is part of a larger project by VTN Architects called "House for Trees."
The permeable top floor allows greenery in to the home to spill out toward the neighborhood.
Stepping Park House has a park as a northern neighbor—a rarity in densely populated Ho Chi Minh City.
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.