794 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A 100-foot-long glass wall opens the view up to views of the bay.
The home's shell of timber and corten steel will develop a natural patina over time.
"Because the clients expressed a lifelong interest in Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy, the unfolding sequence with which one encounters these modern artists’ installations inspired our strategy for approaching the residence," notes the firm. "Approaching guests follow a meandering stone wall through the woods and meadow of the site, eventually leading to a crisp line of Corten steel piercing the meadow; moving toward that image ultimately reveals the main residence, and conveys the visitor to its threshold."
The home is located far from the road on the northwest corner of the property and oriented toward views of the water.
A bird's eye view of the home, which sits on five acres of bluff top.
Located in the Hampton Bays, the Peconic House is sandwiched between an old-growth forest and the waterfront.
The home “is really about place, how it sits on the site, how it responds to the sun,” reflects McKeel.
Positioned on a sloping hillside, the home is built into the land. The lower level is reserved for Marica and Brock’s “play” space, a workshop and garage, while the upper level houses the bright and airy living quarters.
The exterior is clad in a mixture of stained cedar and shou sugi ban siding.
Set on an idyllic 140 acres of land in Columbia County, New York, the Taghkanic Villa is a collection of buildings and spaces—including a main house, guest house, large shed for land maintenance equipment, vegetable garden, and a dipping pool—that offer modern takes on the traditional farm vernacular.
Located on the far end of Provincetown, Massachusetts, the Beach House boasts 2,400 square feet of prime waterfront real estate within a sculptural, timber-clad volume inspired by the landscape.
Designed to take full advantage of scenic beach views, this 3,500-square-foot residence on Miramar Beach in Montecito, California, features south-facing walls of glass that blur the line between indoors and out.
The flattop Eichler at dusk.
The home's elegant post-and-beam construction as seen from the exterior.
The home has been professionally landscaped with native drought-resistant plants.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Architect Brian White clad the new second story of his formerly dark and cramped ranch-style home with a black-stained cedar rain screen. The large opaque window lights up the stairwell and the second floor.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
The entry is tucked behind a louvered screen, creating a winding path to the front door. The screen, composed of Alaskan Yellow Cedar, shields views from the sidewalk while still allowing interior occupants to see out, and foments "a sense of elegance, mystery, and warmth," says the firm.
The two, season-specific wings of the L-shaped plan are separated by a covered breezeway.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
A massive oak tree is the focal point of the entry courtyard. The entrances to each unit are sheltered beneath the overhanging second-story balcony.
A nighttime view of the home seen from the northeast. To the right is the bedroom wing extending north. To the left is the living room wing stretching to the east.
The view of the house seen from the driveway. To the left is the workshop and wood shed connected to the carport by a trellis.
Set far back on a wooded 7.2-acre property in Bernardsville, New Jersey, the James B. Christie House takes advantage of its private location with ample glazing.
The post-and-beam construction was designed for indoor/outdoor living and has been perfectly preserved over the years, with only two owners.
The Gardiner House is an authentic midcentury gem nestled into the Hollywood Hills.
A 669-square-foot, one bedroom, one bedroom guest unit, the Trillium is a zero-net energy house with a large outdoor storage closet.
Many of the corrugated metal walls are painted black and white, in shades by Benjamin Moore.
The post-and-beam construction has a dramatic carport entrance which showcases the home's clean, midcentury lines.
A separate two-car garage is located near the entrance of the house, which has a bike rack and planters out front.
Reinforced concrete was used for the retaining walls and slabs along all grades, while wood framing with steel framing beams were used at cantilevered areas.
The board-formed concrete, steel, and teak over a rainscreen system blend the building into the site.
Surrounded by rugged beauty, the home was designed with a faceted exterior optimized for wraparound views unique in each room.
Located in Western Idaho, the Cliff House faces views of Payette Lake toward the south and west, while vast granite and dense forest flank the property to the north and east.
The exterior's many textures include stained western red cedar siding, a white oak veneer front door, and a concrete walkway.
A look at the exterior of the cabin.
This custom residence for actor Will Arnett was inspired by LivingHomes' RK2 model. About a third was built on-site, including a glass staircase tower and a guest wing (featuring a recording booth where Will can ply his trademark baritone).
To minimize water use, SCDA and Strata Landscape Architecture designed a native, drought-resistant planting plan with sensor-controlled drip irrigation. The lawn takes up less than 10% of the landscape.
Vertical planks of western red cedar provide a warm contrast against horizontal zinc siding panels.
facade materials
The home’s emphasis on light and linearity is evident even from the street, where carefully placed windows and a combination of stained cedar and Eternit cement-fiber panels create a stunning silhouette.
A collage of brightly colored, geometric volumes comprise the Ettore Sottsass–designed residence of Lesley Bailey and Adrian Olabuenaga, proprietors of jewelry and accessories company ACME Studio. Completed in 1997, this home is one of few private commissions designed by the Italian architect, who passed away in 2007.
Dawnsknoll’s exterior sidings are cement panels and Resysta wood. The house’s front gate and garage are made from recycled wood.
Spray foam insulation has been applied on all sides of the container. A small air conditioner helps cool the unit in summer.
The office has been cladded in yellow cedar to comply with the city requirement that all shipping containers be clad.
From his home in New Westminster, the commute to Randy's new office takes just 30 seconds.
RBA Studio cantilevers over its concrete foundation by seven feet and draws utilities from Randy's 1930s residence.
The front gate opens to the inner courtyard.
The front of the home features a privacy wall and a peek at the pleated roofline.
LivingHomes at Atwater Village is a part of a collection of six single-family homes located in the heart of L.A.'s Atwater Village.
The C6 is one of LivingHomes' most popular models. Coming in at 1,232 square feet, this LivingHome offers a comfortable living space for a relatively low cost.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.