544 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Exterior View
Exterior View
The exterior of the home is clad in charred wood siding, which pays homage to summertime bonfires on the beach.
Modern mountain cabin aesthetics inspired the interior design of this tiny home.
The pines to the west of the home provide protection from the wind.
The upper volume is clad in stained black cedar, while the lower volume is built with concrete.
Photovoltaic panels have been installed on the sloped, south-facing volume.
The horizontal plane that rests atop concrete load-bearing walls has been extended to protect the interior from solar gain and provide shelter to the outdoor living areas.
The architects have installed ample glazing along the south facade, particularly on the lower level, to take advantage of solar gain in the winter. The concrete floors also help retain heat.
Here is a look at the colors of the beach at dusk against the charred timber exterior.
Materials such as sand, stone, and driftwood have been inspired by the lakefront site.
This exterior deck is partially closed and is oriented to take advantage of lakeside vistas. It also allows sunlight into the study and master suite.
Inspired by Philip Johnson's Glass House, the home was developed in a collaboration between Swedish architect Iver Lofving—an architect at the Philip Johnson Architecture Studio who worked on the iconic Seagram Building—and Athos Zacharias, a moderin abstract painter who was working at the time as a studio assistant to Jackson Pollock and later to Elaine de Kooning.
Casa Gaz seen at night with a closed entrance gate.
Casa Gaz stands out from its neighbors with its facade clad in vertical timber.
Concrete walls dominate the ground floor, while the first floor is clad in Ipe. "The upper-level white walls and Ipe wood ceiling gives the same contrast, but in a more peaceful way for the sleeping quarters," Gracia notes.
"The east façade reveals these distinct parts of the house—the grounded bedroom volume to the north, the glass hallway, which offers a glimpse to otherwise secluded outdoor spaces, and the living pavilion that is lifted above the site to view the forest and pond," the team adds.
Based in the Bay Area, this firm is under Everlast Development, a licensed construction company with more than 15 years of experience in high-end, custom residential remodeling.  Their homes are typically considered to be more of a recreational vehicle (RV), and are sealed with insulation that has an r-value of 20, making them portable and comfortable in temperatures as low as 0-degrees Fahrenheit.
A 2,800-square-foot rooftop solar array covers all of the home's electricity needs.
Unfinished cypress siding was chosen for its natural resiliency and durability
A slatted wood canopy extends from one side of the cabin, providing an increased amount of filtered light.
Fortunately, the existing structure had good bones, so Edmonds + Lee was able to maintain the dwelling's original footprint, and focus on opening up the interiors.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
With 60 years of combined experience in the worlds of residential and commercial construction, I Can Build It (ICBI) and their partner company, Container Homes of Maryland, complete a range of tiny home projects as well as larger residences. Their homes often feature custom work, including carpentry and kitchen/bath design. The homes can be built on wheels or a foundation, and are carefully designed for comfortable living. The company has even been featured on "Tiny House Nation."
The entry is marked by a thin, cantilevered canopy hovering over the front porch.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
The award-winning tiny house builder ESCAPE has recently unveiled the first phase of Canoe Bay ESCAPE Village—a tiny home resort community in Northwest Wisconsin.
Outdoor Decks
Entry
Entry
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
Exterior of Pink House from the street. The entryway is recessed to enhance the spatial notion of soild and void.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
Front view of the FlatPak House in Minneapolis, Minnesota. When the architect first told his wife about his idea, she said, “It’s about time you focus on a house for me!” He continues, “It’s like the old story about the cobbler whose kids have no shoes.”
Here is a glimpse at the horizontal cedar siding over a quality rain screen.
To add more headroom to the sleeping lofts, the family opted for expanded dormers.
The family wanted a room on the main floor that could serve as an office and playroom. They also desired their home to include two sleeping lofts, rather than just one.
Generous balconies reach back into the surrounding forest at every level.
Front facade
The courtyard is just one of many open spaces that will be highly utilized—in the non-winter months anyway. Concrete worked well with developing the language of FlatPak. The second level is a wood panel that can be clad in corrugated metal or cedar—different layers that can be plugged in like covers on your cellphone.
Like the windows, the front door is also a square.
Just as the barn was extended and cantilevered over the sloped site, so too was the deck off the kitchen, which juts out toward the oak grove. “There are 125 coast live oaks on the property,” says Walker. “They’re beautiful trees, so why not exploit that?” See more ways to use oak in your home.
He worked around existing oak and eucalyptus trees for the new building, and retained the vernacular of an original barn, at right, where Frankel hosts concerts. Check out MVRDV's Balancing Barn.
The poured concrete foundation is clearly visible when viewing the back of the home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.