153 Exterior Flat Roofline Beach House Design Photos And Ideas

Aranza de Ariño and Claudio Sodi gave the architects at S-AR carte blanche to design their 850-square-foot beach retreat. The studio delivered an open structure that frames its natural surroundings.
Aranza de Ariño and Claudio Sodi gave the architects at S-AR carte blanche to design their 850-square-foot beach retreat.
Making maximum use of a tight footprint, architect Robert Sweet designed a two-story home in Hermosa Beach that provides plenty of flexible indoor/outdoor space for residents Anton and Mardi Watts and their children.
"The placement of the stacked boxes and the space between them has been treated in a sculptural way—always considering the functional needs of habitability and the beauty of the house," explains Estudio Caballero Colón.
Perched quietly on the dunes of New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula, Hut on Sleds serves as a small, sustainable beach retreat for a family of five.
In addition to the workshop, the ground level holds an outdoor shower with easy beach access, a beach equipment storage closet, and a seasonal half bath.
RES4’s modular approach provides a Brooklyn family with a beautiful weatherproof retreat on Long Island. Designed as a hybrid between a double-wide and a courtyard house, the 1,650-square-foot North Fork Bay House was prefabricated off-site as two modules. In addition to time and cost savings, prefabrication helped address the restricted building site, which has a very long and narrow footprint limited by FEMA setback regulations and zoning laws.
Rudolph used red cannonballs as weights to hold the home’s signature wood shutters in place.
The home also features a narrow, in-ground swimming pool which is illuminated at night.
The boxes are stacked at angles to frame distinct views.
The firm was inspired by the simplicity of geometric forms and an exploration of spatial complexity.
Access to the four-story home is via a gently meandering path or an elevator from the lower level to the main entrance. "One of the main challenges was the slope of the plot," says the firm. "The complexity of the geometry forced a very detailed topographic [survey]."
The floor to ceiling glass sliding doors opens the living spaces to the surrounding waterfront and landscape
McCrae House 1
McCrae House 1
McCrae House 1 & 2
Warm, natural cedar is used for the siding, railings, outdoor shower enclosure, and brise-soleil.
Elevated into the trees, the open-plan living area opens up to nature via outdoor decks on either side.
The architects strategically placed the home just north of its neighbors for greater privacy. Set on a very long and narrow site, the home enjoys direct access to Great Peconic Bay with clear views of the water.
Architect David Montalba renovated a 1970s bungalow for Janette Sosothikul in Oxnard, California, a beach town midway between Malibu and Santa Barbara.
A front view of the renovated home. The wood slats screening the bedrooms on the street-facing side are repeated indoors on the interior staircase.
“It’s a great little place—a throwback to the old days of California coastal communities,” says Montalba.
Mark had hoped to cover the cabin with genuine thatch but opted for a synthetic version. “It’s durable and fire-resistant, and if a piece blows off, you just staple on a new one,” he says.
A pared-down cabin on Eleuthera island was designed as an off- the-grid retreat for Mark and Kate Ingraham and their daughter. Envisioning “a simple box rest- ing lightly on the land,” architect Jacob Brillhart specified natural materials like Western red cedar so that the structure would fade into the landscape. Bahamian builder Cecil McCardy and his crew used machetes to clear the remote site.
Custom landscape lighting illuminates the home's architectural features at night.
"The hut is a series of simple design moves," says the firm. "The form is reminiscent of a surf lifesaving or observation tower."
The 1,600-square-foot lake home has three bedrooms and two baths, and was built for a family of three. The narrow lot has views of the water on both sides, so the firm placed the living areas on the upper floor to take advantage of this, and positioned a screened-in porch (seen on the left) to mediate between the interior and exterior.
A peek at the rooftop terrace. Here, rainwater is collected for the gravity tanks behind.
"A small volume at the rear is clad in contrasting 'flat sheet,' a cheap building material found in many traditional holiday homes," explains the firm.
Guarding against coastal erosion, the 430-square-foot retreat rests on two thick wooden sleds which allow the structure to be readily relocated when needed.
Set among fields along the south facing coast of Long Island and within a short walk to the ocean, this Hamptons residence is a quiet refuge for a growing family and offers extraordinary views of the surrounding landscape. The volume of the house is a two-story wood, steel, and glass structure; transparent walls provide delicacy to the house. Louvered screens and deep overhangs shield the interior spaces from summer sun and allow warm winter light to dip below the roofline.
Nestled at the end of a private cul-de-sac on nearly an acre of pristine waterfront property in Sagaponack, New York, this distinctive, contemporary retreat from the renowned architectural firm Bates Masi + Architects makes a dramatic modern statement. Juxtaposing elegant, Alaskan cedar siding with broad expanses of glass, the home exudes an effortless and seamless flow between its indoor and outdoor spaces.
The second-floor terrace forms a partial covering for the deck below it.
To take in views of Victoria’s coastline from all directions, Austin Maynard Architects crafted a bach-inspired beach house using a circular, corridor-free design and full-height glazing. Exposed trusses and a simple material palette keep focus on the outdoors, while rooftop solar panels and a rainwater harvesting system help the dwelling reduce site impact.
Completed in just six weeks by Australian practice Archiblox, this modest prefab home is perched atop cliffs with prime views of Avalon Beach, just a short drive away from Sydney. Oriented east to west to maximize cross ventilation, the house is clad in marine-grade Colorbond Ultra steel and Queensland blue gum to protect against the elements.
Fed up with flashy, environmentally insensitive beach homes, architect Gerald Parsonson and his wife, Kate, designed a humble hideaway nestled behind sand dunes along the New Zealand coastline. Crafted in the image of a modest Kiwi bach, their 1,670-square-foot retreat consists of a group of small buildings clad in black-stained pine weatherboards and fiber-cement sheets.
Luciano Kruk devised an economical floor plan at the clients’ request. “The house was constituted as a compact block,” said the firm, with shared living spaces on the ground floor and two bedrooms—one a private master and the other a bunk room—up top.
A glass enclosure at the front corner visually lightens up the concrete massing, while bringing in natural light filtered through the surrounding trees.
Wild bush, sand dunes, and scrub surrounds the circular home. The architects were careful to minimize the building impact on the fragile landscape.
The silvertop ash shiplap boards that clad the home will develop a patina over time.
The home's punched windows are shaded by Cor-Ten steel.
Supported by concrete columns, the home hovers above the sandy  terrain. An expansive ocean-front deck blends indoor and outdoor living spaces.
Located in a coveted, beachfront, gated community, this Malibu home is surrounded by ocean views and miles of walking trails.
Fast assembly, affordability, and energy efficiency make kit homes a desirable option for homeowners.
On the exterior of the two-story beach house, much of the original brickwork was kept, and the new addition at ground level is faced in smooth, concrete blocks. The architects wrapped the upper floor in a new "timber skin" of Silvertop ash shiplap with a Grey Mist finish, then inserted V-shaped steel supports that reference historic, Australian beach houses in the area.
The house also comes with a dock.
Wright's sketches called for an external stair off of the cantilevered section. Massaro nixed the stairs due to modern building codes.
Tongue-and-groove cedar siding clads the exterior. The windows are by Alpine.
Set on a quarter-acre pasture rented from a family friend in Maui, the tiny house operates entirely off grid with electricity, water, and sewer needs handled on-site.
Custom rosewood gates and privacy screens at the street entrance. Unsealed, these will grey naturally over time.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.