83 Exterior Flat Roofline Mid Century Design Photos And Ideas

“At night, the Smith House appears to float like a glass box in space.
The vertical part of the "T" contains the living and dining rooms, which are divided by a fireplace. This area also provides the most dramatic vantage point for the sweeping views.
Here is a look at the elegant entrance.
The 1,550-square-foot hillside home features a vertical T-shaped layout and houses dramatic city and ocean views.
This home is iconic of Sugden’s work in Utah, and is a direct expression of both the Modernist movement and the Bauhaus school.
Like all of Sugden’s work, the building frame is entirely made of A36 steel that is joined exclusively with moment-resisting welded connections, and rests on an exposed, reinforced concrete foundation.
Fortunately, the existing structure had good bones, so Edmonds + Lee was able to maintain the dwelling's original footprint, and focus on opening up the interiors.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
The atrium-style design perfectly integrates a sense of the outdoors throughout the home.
The atrium door at the front entry (on the right) is painted a light blue—the same accent color that has been used in the home's kitchen and bathroom.
"We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Craig Bassam of the house he shares with Scott Fellows. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.
Miller House Front Facade
Here's the cover image in all its glory. Van der Rohe's Farnsworth House is the essential glass house (sorry Philip J) and looks pretty spectacular in the snow. One wonders if those windows are double-paned though. Photo by Jason Schmidt.
The home appears to glow from within at night.
In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
White brick exterior of Goddard and Mandolene’s home post renovation.
The soaring two-story structure at dusk.
All the public indoor/outdoor entertaining areas and kitchen overlook stunning ocean views.
A back view of the house reveals its glass facade and perch on the hillside overlooking East Honolulu.
A midcentury property in Palm Springs, California.
The goal was to be able to squeeze a full bathroom, kitchen, living room, storage, as well as a sleeping space that would accommodate a king-sized bed into the cabin's original tiny footprint.
The Hammerman House is truly a masterpiece of California Modernism.
Gwathmey had designed many private homes for a long list of exclusive clientele who appreciated his boldly geometric modernist style.
The two-bedroom, two-bathroom house has a pool and an open air carport on a fourth-acre lot.
The longtime owner updated the landscaping in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000.
Clerestory windows add to the clean, modernist vibe.
The wraparound deck provides stellar views and is perfect for entertaining.
“It was great to work from the plans of someone who was a part of the history of architecture,” says Drapszo.
Taking an active role in the restoration of a midcentury house she and her husband bought near Chicago in 2013, Eva Kowalow honored the vision of the home’s architect and previous owner, Jack Viks, while updating the structure to fit her style and the needs of her family. The entrance gate, designed by Viks, is original.
Outside, Eva and landscape designers Rosborough Partners thinned the trees directly surrounding the home. The paint on the steel beams is Extra White by Sherwin-Williams, coated in Duration Exterior Acrylic Latex.
On the exterior, Eva chose to cover the existing yellow brick with Prodema wood paneling installed by GFS Architectural Systems, Inc
This house on La Cuesta Drive is located near Runyon Canyon Hiking Trails.
Outsite partnered with Batch on this Venice Beach home to offer a place where locals can shop, live, and work. But considering how much the address can do, not much was changed of its midcentury exterior.
The front door opens to a central atrium, a classic feature of Eichler homes.
The home features a classic post-and-beam flat-roof construction.
A wall of windows lines the rear of the home.
The facade
The vi
The outdoor spaces and roof deck are impressive and feature a living roof succulent garden.
Originally designed as a single story residence the home features clean lines and an indoor-outdoor connection.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
The Case Study homes were built between 1945 and 1966 and were commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine to create inexpensive and replicable model homes to accommodate the residential housing boom in the United States caused by the flood of returning soldiers at the end of World War II.
An exterior view of the International-style home.
Setback from the street, this extremely private one level property has sliders with outdoor access, solar panels, and mountain views from every room.
The large L-shaped estate looks out on a large pool and a luxurious outdoor entertaining area.
At nighttime, the house glows as a mid-century modern icon.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.