42 Bathroom Drop In Tubs Design Photos And Ideas

Master bathroom with views to the valley-VILLA CP
Glass elements not only allude to the ocean, but also lend a fresh look to some of the rooms. Here, Trend glass mosaic tiles brighten up the bathroom. Axor fixtures from Hansgrohe stand next to a minimalist radiator from Zehnder.
Bathroom
Taking inspiration from train cabins, the guest bed lifts to reveal a bathtub. Garlick made the mechanism using sailboat hardware. The velvet curtain is by Restoration Hardware and the tile is from Stone Tile.
The tile is by Carter.
The new master bathroom features matte-black quartz countertops, a Cube sink, and a Scala wall-mount faucet. A Hansgrohe showerhead is surrounded by bold Gelsomino glass mosaic tile.
Master Bathroom
The bathroom features a Duravit sink that was incorrectly ordered for a job by the contractor and then donated to Hale. The stools are from Ikea, the tub was salvaged, and the tiles were surplus from another project.
Replacing the old toilet with a wall-hung Duravit model continues the floating theme, which is echoed by the custom recessed magazine caddy. The room’s sole freestanding piece is a glass-sided cabinet from Restoration Hardware. The diamond-shaped tile is from the Dwell collection at Heath Ceramics.
In order to give the redesign a seamless feel, Brigham and Archuleta carried the use of wood throughout the room—including the shower. Archuleta researched types of wood that can withstand a high-moisture environment, and the most visually appealing was coastal redwood. He came across an unlikely source of reclaimed redwood: old pickling vats from a company called Trestlewood. 

Experience in working with reclaimed wood taught Archuleta that “wood that’s been exposed to liquid for long periods of time pulls in minerals that it wouldn't naturally have access to in its living state.” In this case, the iron bands and nails that held the barrels together reacted with the pickling liquid, leaving behind a rich, dark patina.
Brigham works primarily with wood and Archuleta had recently been exploring the potential of glass fiber reinforced concrete, so those disparate but complementary materials became the main focus of the project. Together, the warm wood and the clean, minimalist concrete create a “warm and serene space, reminiscent of a spa,” says Brigham.
Master Bathroom
Master Bath with dual shower heads including rain head / jet tub
A creative way of cutting costs is on display in son Nate’s bathroom, where the wall tiles are arranged in a whimsical, irregular pattern making use of slim sections of tile cut for transitions and corners. “We came up with a pattern that could incorporate random sizes so we were able to order the exact amount of tile that we needed,” Bischoff says. “It allowed us to get the most out of the tile price because there wasn’t that 20 percent that [would normally go] into the landfill.” The two-bowl sink is the Vitviken model from Ikea; it’s topped with a chrome Hansgrohe faucet and accented by Ikea’s Godmorgon medicine cabinets customized by MADE.
Pepa gets a better view of what Gorman is explaining in the girls’ bathroom from her stump stool.
Kids' Bathroom
Kids' Bathroom
Bedroom  #1 Bathroom
The master bathroom is softly lit by a skylight. The bath, by Laufen, is sunk into the floor to maintain a feeling of space.
The brass fittings are new to the project but are similar to metal that was originally used elsewhere in the project. The fittings, seen here in the children’s bathroom, will quickly acquire a dark patina.
The top floor holds the Chiavellis’ bedroom suite, with a dressing room and built-in spa. “The farmers dried their crops up here,” says Chiavelli. “We knew right away this was the spot that we wanted to have our own room.”
Bathroom

A creative way of cutting costs is on display in son Nate’s bathroom, where the wall tiles are arranged in a whimsical, irregular pattern making use of slim sections of tile cut for transitions and corners. “We came up with a pattern that could incorporate random sizes so we were able to order the exact amount of tile that we needed,” Bischoff says. “It allowed us to get the most out of the tile price because there wasn’t that 20 percent that [would normally go] into the landfill.” The two-bowl sink is the Vitviken model from Ikea; it’s topped with a chrome Hansgrohe faucet and accented by Ikea’s Godmorgon medicine cabinets customized by MADE.
The residents, who previously lived in Japan, asked that the bathroom be modeled after a Japanese-style bathhouse. Wood-effect porcelain tiles from Ariostea line the shower and tub area.
The Lais designed their house to be theirs forever. As such, they were able to make design moves that made sense for themselves but that wouldn't have high resale value, like the Japanese-style master bathroom in the middle of the second floor instead of off of the master bedroom. The traditional setup features bath stools from Muji for washing off.
The bathroom includes a sink Bornstein discovered in a secondhand store.
The focal point of the room is a glass fiber-reinforced concrete sink that weighs 460 pounds. The material is stronger then regular concrete, so the overall thickness of the sink is a mere two inches. By using GFRC, Archuleta was also able to create a more uniform surface with almost no pinholes—important both for maintaining the minimalistic appearance of the room and to avoid leaks in the areas that would be in direct contact with water. Concrete is also incorporated into the bathtub and shower bases.
The master bathroom is one of few spaces that lacks windows, but it opens onto the brilliantly daylit master bedroom.
Interior walls were repainted and flooring was repaired, but the master bathroom received the most attention in the existing house. The renovation included marble mosaic floor tiles, fixtures by Blu Bathworks, and Silestone countertops.
Master Bathroom
The bathroom's sauna-like interior includes a deep Toto bathtub—characteristic of traditional Japanese baths. The wooden hiba paneling, chosen because it is more water resistant than hinoki, is specific to the Northern Aomori region of Japan.
In the master bath, the architect managed to combine privacy and a view by adding a horizontal-line pattern to the glass wall.
"I put everything that I've always loved into this house," says Tyler—and that includes white tiles edged with gray grout in the bathroom, a design move previous clients had balked at.

A comfortable bathroom is a key source of tranquility in your home. Whether sleek and minimal or bursting with colorful tiles, a curated modern bathroom impresses residents and guests alike. Find inspiration to create your own personal oasis with these projects featuring popular counter materials like marble, quartz, and wood; flooring options like ceramic, hardwood, and concrete; and a huge variety of sink, tub, and shower options.

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