129 Living Room Carpet Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The central fireplace anchors the open-plan living space and serves as a divider between the rooms. Mahogany-framed sliding doors lead out to the deck. The living space features oak floors throughout.
A sitting room.
Large windows, a rich wood paneled ceiling, and brick make up this cozy living room.
The dining room sits just off the living room.
The open living plan features a cedar-paneled tongue-and-groove ceiling anchored by a brick fireplace.
The home does an excellent job of bringing the outdoors in.
The floor plan has not been altered over the years. The kitchen overlooks a sitting room and the atrium beyond.
Walls of glass fill the home with natural light.
The tongue-and-groove ceiling has not been painted, and globe pendant lighting abounds.
The signature great room is one of the high points of the light-filled property.
The home's furnishings and decor reflect the couple's personal style, with a blend of midcentury modern and Scandinavian-inspired pieces.
Within, the curving interiors are spread loosely across five levels.
The large expanses of glass frame views that were perfectly planned. The seating areas are furnished with Scandia lounge chairs that were designed by Hans Brattrud in the 1950s and are now being produced by Fjordfiesta.
The original double sided fireplace anchors the main living room.
A well preserved example of post-and-beam construction, the home's shell is largely untouched.
The kids' room is outfitted with a cheerful orange Case Study daybed from Modernica and a selection of vintage maps and artwork.
A highly curated collection of artwork adorns the vibrant lobby, which is richly textured with dark woods, lush jewel-toned velvets, brass, and leather. A work by Jesse Mockrin hangs above the hearth.
The living room features a wood-burning fireplace, as well as a tongue-and-groove ceiling that has been painted white.
A Muuto couch in the living room.
The 1946 Womb Chair by Eero Saarinen by Knoll was reupholstered in Knoll Boucle Orange.
The living area’s Chicklet sofa by Ray Wilkes is covered in a Knoll tweed.
Artist Christopher Florentino says his respect for Gene Leedy drove his update of the architect’s 1963 Ellison Residence in central Florida: “Being original is important to me. I don’t want Gene Leedy to come here and be like, ‘Damn, you killed my vision.’” In the living room, George Nelson’s Saucer Bubble pendant hovers over Eames classics, like an LCW chair, a Molded Fiberglass armchair, and a Molded Plywood coffee table. Christopher found the lounge, an Eames replica, in a dumpster and couldn’t let it go to waste. A Warhol print hangs from the sandstone block wall; the Ekko mobile is by Matthew Richards.
Primary colors and bold art dominate the home's decor. "The yellow and green Warhol flowers —that's my favorite Warhol. My last name means flowers in Italian. So I just l love flowers,
Luise Stauss, a former photo editor at The New York Times Magazine,  sits in the living room of the downtown Brooklyn apartment she shares with her husband, Nicholas Blechman, the creative director of The New Yorker. The roughly 1,000-square-foot space feels larger than it is, thanks to high ceilings and bay windows. Twin 1962 Bastiano sofas by Tobia Scarpa are joined by a Cité chair by Jean Prouvé and a wood chair acquired from the New York Historical Society. The floor lamp is by David Weeks Studio.
Jones' original Lido design featured a massive angled skylight that bathed the front patio in natural light. While the skylight is now covered up, the outline can still be seen.
The fireplace is open on three sides.
Expansive walls of glass and sliding doors that lead to the large exterior patio create a strong sense of indoor/outdoor living.
"We’ve developed a great working relationship where we understand and respect what each brings to a project. Bear understands the architectural intent and interprets it skillfully and successfully. This not only enhances the finished building, it ensures a seamless process along the way," says Bornas.
A lavish, velvet-upholstered red sofa in the living room.
The residence also features a basement with an additional living room.
Sutherland opened the second story and converted it into a loft, which matches the ample seating below.
The architects have added cement cladding with aluminum-framed windows above and besides an existing brick wall to create a framework with a stable base and a lightweight upper section.
This view shows the space from another angle. The door at the bottom of the staircase leads to the laundry area. The door to the right of the staircase goes to a modern wine cellar with a sleek mounted wine rack from Stact.
Silver has also inserted a home office that is located just off of the den.
"I prefer to think of it as a lower level because it no longer has the feel of a basement," explains Silver. A large picture window lets in lots of natural light and frames an atrium filled with succulents.
An alternate view of the living room.
A look at the open living plan. Note the fireplace is set in the center of the space against a brick dividing wall.
The exterior walls above grade have been completely glazed with the original bronze tinted glass, and are secured directly to the structure by neoprene zipper gaskets.
In lieu of a checkerboard effect, Kovel kept his carpet squares all vibrantly verdant. With the bamboo cabinets and countertops the whole space has a pastoral feel. “I wanted it to be like the Bradys’ backyard,” he says.
A sliding glass Western Window Systems door dissolves the boundary between indoor and outdoor.
The loft is a private oasis for daydreaming.
The loft, visually and physically, is the most secluded area of the home with its maze-like feel.
"We have tried to create several zones in the house, so that even if you are in the same room, it is possible to do things independently from others. To be alone together," says the studio’s cofounder Tor O. Austigard.
Architects Tim Ratliff and Tam Landells tripled the footprint of the four-room house and increased the square footage to almost 2,000. Blue doors that were part of the original rear wall connect the “snug,” or sitting room, to the new space. The chair was Natasha’s step-granddad’s; the 1960s pendant was found on eBay.
Here is the same space from an alternate view.
A look at the sitting room on the second level with a separate niche for an office.
Ray sits at the central hearth on the north end of the comfortable sunken living area. From this perspective, you can see how the interior spaces flow into one another, passing one half-level up into the breakfast nook and kitchen and out from there onto the overgrown hillside. The various built-in furnishings have all been there since the house's construction.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.