696 Kitchen Wood Counters Design Photos And Ideas

“I wanted to change the kitchen,” Lyndsay says. “The cabinetry was too dark, so we wanted to lighten it up. At first, it was an orange wood—and we ended up painting it white to achieve this.”
“Design choices, such as heavy bar stools in the kitchen, were made to ensure the boat could function well docked or at sea,” Lyndsay says.
"We give every client a questionnaire," Kevin says. "The first question asks what they need in their home. No compromise. The second question asks what they want in their home. And the third question asks what would blow their mind. At the end of the day, I’m looking to fit all of those things into their tiny home."
A short hall connects the kitchen to the bathroom and holds integrated shelving, a wardrobe, and an electrical box. The open stair treads leading up to the sleeping loft save on space and keep sight lines open.
Douglas fir paneling and ceiling beams punctuate the crisp white space, complementing Baltic birch plywood cabinetry and white oak countertops in the kitchen.
Connoisseurs of living tiny, Heather and Kevin Fritz started their own design-build business to offer truly custom solutions.
A Cove 5 metal fireplace from Charnwood warms up the 215-square-foot cabin.
Custom cabinetry, countertops, and a dining table were crafted from salvaged wood.
Reclaimed wood from the original shed was used on the floors and ceiling in the common area.
The kitchen is outfitted with two solid French walnut counters, a refrigerator, a gas stove with an oven and four burners, a sink, and plenty of cabinetry that's painted a mint green tone.
The dining area displays a solid French walnut table that extends and can accommodate up to four people.
“Drinking water comes from a 20-liter bottle, and can be delivered to the tap with a foot-operated pump, so no electricity is required,” Bene says. The bottle can sustain two people for three days.
The boat’s cabin is split into two distinct areas—the kitchen and the dining area/bedroom.
With a brick backsplash, it is important to make sure that it is carefully cleaned and sealed with a sealant designed for its specific location. There is a charm with exposed brick that, if that is the look you are going for, you will want to ensure that the brick is in good condition and can withstand being exposed.
Standard kitchen features include a countertop and sink, although premium options are available for an additional cost. The adjacent bathroom is ready to go with a standard toilet, vanity, and shower.
Steel open shelves allow the couple to create meaningful vignettes. "It has allowed us to curate these precious pieces, whether from a local ceramicist or other handmade items," notes Lauren. A cowboy painting by Mark Maggiori brings a touch of nostalgia to the space and nods to her childhood in rural Montana.
The new kitchen is a compact eight feet wide—and much more efficient. The IKEA cabinets have been modified and upgraded with hardware, attachments, and fixtures. A Smeg refrigerator replaces a corner cabinet and complements a European-scale cooktop and small oven.
"The galley-style kitchen on the south boundary has a slim footprint compared to the rest of the house, and allows for north-facing windows almost measuring 16 feet in height," says Naughtin. "The windows can be opened to draw warm air up and out of the space."
A neutral color scheme and wood elements give the trailer a cozy, rustic feel.
The interior features durable, lightweight vinyl plank flooring, and the walls are painted Benjamin Moore Cloud White.
The banquette, countertops, floating shelves, niches, and bedframe are made from reclaimed pine.
A large metal staircase near the kitchen folds up and provides access to the loft-like sleeping area.
There, a kitchen and dining area bleed into indoor and outdoor living spaces that have unobstructed views of the city skyline.
The micro home movement paints a rosy picture of financial freedom, simplicity, and self-determination—but going small comes with its own set of challenges.
Nick Dignard and Marie-Catherine P. Émond built this 256-square-foot cabin, an A-Frame structure enveloped by two extended wings, to celebrate a love of outdoor sports. Located in Québec’s Lac-Beauport, the living, dining, and kitchen areas are filled with natural light so that the cabin feels as if it’s actually outside.
Pots, pans, cutlery, and shelves are hung on a pegboard wall in the kitchen, offering a clever way to utilize space that would be otherwise wasted.
Road-Haus features thoughtfully crafted details throughout, such as the leather pulls on the kitchen cabinetry.
The cozy living space features a fireplace with a mantel that doubles as a shelf or coffee table. There is the option of either an electric fireplace or a more expensive gas fireplace.
"By utilizing more windows, our homes bring the outdoors in, providing lots of natural light," says Mackay.
Get the whole family involved in the kitchen, whether it be teaching young ones a tried-and-true recipe or exploring a new dish together.
Get the whole family involved in the kitchen, whether it be teaching young ones a tried-and-true recipe or exploring a new dish together.
Artist Cori Creed stands in the kitchen of the vacation home in rural British Columbia that she and her husband, Craig Cameron, built with their friend and architect, Kevin Vallely. Cori made the ceramic dinnerware and pendants, while Craig built the kitchen island and installed the plywood ceiling with the help of his stepfather.
Hilary and her husband, Jimmy, opted for a functional, restrained material palette. In the dining room, Rejuvenation pendants hang above a table by Hedge House and chairs from Hay.
Rather than wasting precious square-footage on a utility room, the mechanics for the cabin (an on-demand water heat and a two-stage water filter) are housed in two of the kitchenette’s wall cabinets. For cooking, there’s a two-burner induction stove and full-size sink. Most of the cooking is done outside on the grill.
There is no overhead lighting here, but that’s just fine by Szczerbicki, who prefers to avoid “blasting one massive level of light.” Working closely with The Lighting Guild, he went for a more layered approach. Above the cabinetry, LED lights point up to illuminate the rafter, and a custom, linear pendant hangs above the island. “Every piece of lighting was designed with a specific task in mind,” says Szczerbicki. “As it gets darker, you slowly turn on key lights in key locations so the light level gradually grows.”
Szczerbicki crafted the countertops from hardwood timber, a naturally long-lasting material.
Rather than covering the ceiling completely with a sheet or board, Szczerbicki tucked the insulation above the rafters and sealed it in so that the ceiling’s structure was still visible. Painted in white, it becomes a sculptural element that highlights the volume of the space.
Exposed brick from the original structure remains as an “echo of the house that was here before,” says Szczerbicki.
On the opposite side of the tree house, a small kitchenette comes complete with a sink, an induction hot plate, and a small fridge underneath. Other additions include fresh flowers from local florist Stilk & Stæsj, as well as soap from the Norwegian brand Fitjar Islands.
The kitchen cabinetry, counters, and walls are covered with pale birch panels that lend lightness and texture.
The maple farmhouse table doubles as a kitchen island. The custom sink can be used as a perch for the cutting board, and a small tabletop garden provides herbs for cooking.
An assortment of vintage glassware fills the open shelves, as well as ceramics from Don Corleon picked up on a trip to Italy.
The quirky tiled kitchen holds much of its original charm and is Natalie’s favorite room. The rug is the Schumacher Charlap Hyman & Herrero Caiman Alligator rug from Chairish.
In the kitchen, simple farmhouse cabinetry was given a gray-green faux finish to complement the mahogany butcher-block countertops. “The client had started a renovation of the kitchen that he didn't like at all, but he didn't want to pay for new cabinets,” says architect Michael Poris. “So, we worked with the cabinets he had already installed and painted them.”
The open-plan kitchen-and-dining space features a Douglas fir ceiling and ceiling beams and polished concrete floors.
The customized home features a kitchen with plenty of storage—including cabinets, drawers and cubbies beneath the staircase. “Cabinets beneath the stairs leading to the master loft hold our refrigerator, microwave, clothing, shoes, and board games,” Amy says. “We can fit a surprising amount of things because the stairs are so deep.”
A scullery sits behind the kitchen.
The kitchen island features a top made from concrete and rimu, a native New Zealand timber. As rimu is no longer harvested, the piece was pulled from a swamp and is potentially around 1,000 years old. The split between the concrete and timber reflects the split between the flooring materials. “The faceted form of the island ties into our concept and links to the fractured forms on the exterior of the house,” says Craig.
A kitchenette includes a brass backsplash, stainless-steel sink, and black timber cabinetry where a fridge is tucked away.
WC Ferrell Cabinetry built the kitchen’s custom cabinets, which are finished with Sugatsune SN Series pulls and a coat of Benjamin Moore’s Swiss Coffee. The board and batten in the kitchen is mimicked in the exterior siding.
The kitchen countertops are made of oiled soapstone, and the backsplash features Heath Ceramics tiles. The island is a Carrara marble slab fitted onto an industrial base from Big Daddy's Antiques.
A small kitchen island sits opposite a rammed earth fireplace. “This home is a very delicate balance of materials and form,” says architect Tono Mirai. “My design concept is not to add anything extra, and I aim to construct earth walls in a very sophisticated and contemporary way.”
Two friends spent three years reviving this 16th-century Basque church near Bilbao, Spain. Abandoned since the late 1970s, the church was in need of serious repair. The roof had caved in and vegetation had thoroughly invaded the structure. Built in the mid-16th century, with some add-ons in the form of an 18th-century bell tower and sacristy, the church had obvious archaeological and historical value.
A subway-tile backsplash, Tasmanian Oak plywood counters and white cabinetry maintains a light, fresh aesthetic in the kitchen. "I wanted a natural look," says Ashlee.
The office space—which had been the former workspace of the client’s father—was left as is.
The former painting studio is now a multipurpose kitchen/dining/living/office space. Woodworking accounted for a major portion of the renovation budget—many of the furnishings were custom made using either pine or birch plywood (as seen in the countertop and office table).
The Perezes drink home brewed beer at the kitchen table, which folds down from the wall; the table's underside serves as a chalkboard when folded up.
A wood-framed chalkboard folds down from a wall in the kitchen and provides more counter space and a dining area. The open wood shelving was crafted from a beloved table that did not fit in the tiny home.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.