625 Kitchen Wood Counters Design Photos And Ideas

An industrial-style metal sconce, ceramic tableware, and wood countertops lend a farmhouse aesthetic to the kitchen.
Joel crafted open shelves made of oak for the large kitchen, where Emma likes to cook and bake with Isla and Ivy.
Interior Designer Stephanie Dyer in the completed project.
Dyer Studio custom-designed the island with a black-stained white oak wood base and a walnut and soapstone counter that curves at both ends.
Dyer was inspired by all of the original curved details throughout the home, and wove subtle references into the kitchen’s design, including the scalloped detail in the stone counter and backsplash, the curving walls of the stove alcove, and at the coved ceilings.
Removing the dropped ceilings had a dramatic effect on the perceived size of the room. “I think the ceiling height alone changed how that space felt,” says Dyer.
The team added a bank of windows above the sink to flood the room with light. The ceiling pendants are from Allied Maker and the stool is the Cherner Counter Stool from Design Within Reach.
The color of the BlueStar range references the dining room.
Per the clients’ request, the kitchen skews to a predominantly white color palette, with the bespoke island providing contrast.
“For the ceiling dome above the cooking area, the exaggerated style and pattern add whimsy to the space and conceal the required equipment and piping,” explains the firm.
In the kitchen, designer Polina Kopteva used Tikkurila N435 blue paint.
Kerf cabinetry, Heath Ceramics tile, and a BlueStar range complement stainless steel countertops and a porcelain sink in the kitchen.
In an apartment of only about 350 square feet, Madrid–based architectural firm elii has designed a functional layout with a bright palette that emphasizes light and views to the streetscape outside. The light green cabinetry keeps the apartment feeling bright, while the wood gives texture and a natural feeling to the space.
The orange custom cabinets in the kitchen were specially manufactured by Factory Tool.
The most recent renovation utilizes reasonably low-cost materials, such as pine, oak, and Carrara marble, to create a simple and cohesive palette.
In the kitchen, oak joinery and a minimal fireplace sit within a neutral, low-cost pine plywood wall.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
Walnut counters and open shelving complement dark blue-painted cabinetry and copper drawer pulls in the kitchen, where aluminum panels from Muraluxe give the impression of a tile backsplash.
Ryan Tuttle’s airy tiny home in the San Francisco Bay Area has distinct work areas and a surprising amount of storage space.
The kitchen features oak woodwork, black fixtures and fittings, and black hexagonal tiles that mimic the lines of the local landscape and represent the “basalt columns and moodiness of Iceland”.
The Norm Architects' SURFACE kitchen for Reform is available in three different options: smoked oak, natural oak, and metal.
"Natural materials are patient and adaptable, they speak of time and of transience. They don’t require much care or maintenance and are more likely to patinate beautifully."
The house also references many Japanese design qualities, like materials, craftsmanship, and the home's overall aesthetic.
The surface of the cabinet doors are made from saw cut veneer, which Bjerre-Poulsen says gives the design a very tactile element. "You can see and feel the groves from the saw on the surface."
"This house had something I couldn’t really describe," he shares. "There was a certain old-world atmosphere with its abandoned beauty that we both thought was extremely poetic and alluring."
The cabinetry is meant to feel like a freestanding piece of furniture, whether or not it is placed against the wall or in the center of the room.
The handles of Bjerre-Poulsen’s kitchen are bronzed tombac, a material that has been discontinued; however, Reform now offers handles in brass for a similar look.
"We wanted to create a kitchen that would develop and become prettier with time. Something that was raw, tactile, and natural. Our kitchen reflects this thought by using materials from nature to carry the design. In Scandinavia, we have a tradition of inviting nature inside, blurring the boundaries between what is inside and outside," says Bjerre-Poulsen.
Bjerre-Poulsen's personal goals were to create a space that was highly functional as well as exceedingly beautiful.
Jonas Bjerre-Polsen at home in his custom-designed Surface kitchen from Norm Architects for Reform.
Mariah included as many modular elements as possible in the kitchen. "I didn't want a lot of built-ins that would make the space look and feel heavy," she says.
A ceiling cut-out connects the lower-level to an upstairs library/hang-out space, and also fashions a light well lined in Heath Ceramics tile.
The new kitchen is defined by a 14-foot island and bank of windows overlooking the backyard. The counters are stainless steel and maple butcher block. The ceiling sconces are Cedar & Moss.
A rope ladder accesses the loft-style bedroom in the Ada model.
The interior of Ada, Norske Mikrohus's smaller model, is customizable and can be appointed with a wood-burning stove.
Norske Mikrohus built cabinetry and drawers below the kitchen counters, omitting upper cabinetry in an effort to create spaciousness for the interior.
Vilde features plenty of windows so as to flood the interior with sunlight and connect the home to the natural landscape.
In the kitchen, an oak counter warms white lacquered cabinetry and a marble backsplash. "The kitchen was one of the trickiest parts of the flat to design," Petillault says. "[It was located] in the center of the floor plan, one room away from the windows, [so] we decided to blend it into the living room."
The floors, cabinet face frames, upper wall panels, and the tops of the bathroom and shower are made from a recycled and re-milled factory maple and beech blend from Longleaf Lumber in Berwick, Maine. The couple kept two of the original cage doors: one at the front, and the other at the back of the bus.
“The details in some of the woodwork gets into the realm of cabinetmaking—which, in retrospect, might have been taking things a bit far, but it was well worth the effort,” Jack says.
The original sconces and pendant light fixtures were kept, giving a nod to the Airstream’s heyday. New engineered wood flooring, IKEA cabinetry, and walnut veneer countertops were installed.
New wood floors were laid in a herringbone configuration in the kitchen, and the butcher block counters also have that pattern.
In the kitchen, Rossi pulled down the drywall to expose the unique framing at the peaked ceiling. "When we opened it up, it had that beautiful curved detail," says Rossi. "That's super rare." The team added glass there to emphasize the detail.
The window units over the counter were also salvaged finds.
"The drawer pulls are leather straps that I stained," Shaffer says. "We didn’t want any metal hardware in the kitchen since it’s reasonably small and we were afraid of bumping into it. And we just loved the look of leather drawer pulls!"
"We have a surprising amount of cabinetry for a kitchen of this size and we utilize all of it," Shaffer says.
"Our house is so white and bright and greenery makes it feel cozier," Shaffer says. "Plants are a great way to improve air quality and bring the outdoors inside. I work at a small plant shop so it's difficult not to come home with a new plant every week. Last time I counted, there were over forty plants in this little place."
White-painted tongue-and-groove pine walls and a ceiling contrast with dark laminate floors, creating a bright and warm aesthetic for Katherine and Shelby's tiny home in Portland.
The Cashios relocated the rear bathroom to the middle of the space, and installed electrical appliances instead of gas appliances. “In most RVs, the cooktop, oven, fridge, and furnace all have the option of using propane. The reason we chose electric was for peace of mind and safety. We did not feel comfortable having propane appliances with the kids. Even with having a 50-amp plug and using a microwave, we never had any issues with running multiple appliances simultaneously,” says Colleen.
Carbon bar stools by Bertjan Pot from Moooi rest under the kitchen island.
The ceiling is unfinished plywood covered by a metal screen that diffuses light from LED strips.
The interior of the house is lined in pine. Anchoring the dining area are an antique Norwegian farm table and chairs. The appliances are by Gaggenau.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.