218 Exterior Shingles Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
Fortunately, the existing structure had good bones, so Edmonds + Lee was able to maintain the dwelling's original footprint, and focus on opening up the interiors.
To evoke the feel of a tiny nature cabin, two massive sliding doors can be used to divide the common areas so that each section can be isolated from the rest of the house.
All windows and doors have been custom-designed and fitted with aluminum framing.
Here is the lovely home at dusk.
The cedar shingles—common to local buildings—are scaled up to the size of the boards to cover the roof and sidewalls.
Each structure has an independent mechanical system so it can be shut down when not in use.
As with connected farms, the limited material palette unifies the various spaces.
The separate volumes are unified in their external appearance.
From the courtyard, views extend straight through the home to the other side of the structure.
To instill the desired sense of comfort and peace, it was important that the design blend with the setting and local building traditions.
Speaking to his original design, architect Saul Zaik says, “We were really just building boxes with a bunch of windows but experimenting with how you integrated indoor and outdoor spaces.” The house has seven different openings to the exterior, allowing different courtyard or patio settings for a range of outdoor activities, including seating for a gathering on the street-facing side. The Milfords hired Lilyvilla Gardens for the landscaping around the house, including variegated bluestone steps with thyme joints.
Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.
The glazing faces the lake, providing privacy from the road.
The first-floor cantilevers out and is perched like a platform, serving as a great viewpoint for observing the surrounding forest scenery.
Rather than create a typical two-story home, the architects have designed a multi-layered space with a series of platforms.
Erecting a modern cabin where a tool shed once stood became a family exercise for architect Jim Cutler and his daughter, Hannah, who worked with him on the design and build.
It shouldn't be surprising that Hawaii, the state most vulnerable to climate change, is the first to try and mitigate the crucial impact of the rising sea levels.
The roofline of the addition has a double pitch; a tall, slim window punctuates the side. High sand content in the mortar gives it a yellowish tint that contrasts with the bricks.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half.
A sweeping, arc roof that slopes steeply on one side.
The house is set within an expansive meadow.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
Viewed from the swimming pool, the new scheme largely obscures the original house—appearing as a new-build, modern house of a composition reminiscent of the mid-twentieth-century Case Study Houses.
YUN Architecture carefully restored the exterior of the house with new windows, dormers, and wood frames.
Flat sections of the roof are topped with photovoltaic panels.
ts asymmetric single-hip roof captures a generous interior space, and a single operable triangular window at its leeward tip creates gentle airflow, supplementing the deliberately designed cross-breezes that negate the need for air conditioning.
The home features a long, slender volume that shields the rest of the residence from the noise and movement on the adjacent street.
The gabled roof ridge is parallel to the hill.
Gridded steel frame windows were added throughout the home to provide natural daylight to a city dwelling, unique for a London Residence of this type.
The roof was built with prefabricated wood elements.
The home is equipped with solar water heating.
The expansive property contains an extensive forest and trail system.
The home is naturally integrated into its bucolic setting.
The northern façade of the main house is set at an angle to the barn
The design of the 3890-square-foot main residence and its adjacent barn have been executed with the highest degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail, drawing from traditional influences and the vernacular of the rural northeast.
The design of the 3890-square-foot main residence and its adjacent barn have been executed with the highest degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail, drawing from traditional influences and the vernacular of the rural northeast.
Vestigial stone walls that remain throughout the property, almost echoing the home's poetic use of stone.
A perpendicular wing houses the garage. The house has no air conditioning, relying on lake breezes and cross-ventilation for cooling. Each bedroom has a screened door that opens to the deck and an adjustable transom above the hallway door to encourage the circulation of air.
Vince and Adrienne Murphy’s rural retreat is clad in gray shingles and gray-stained pine. “They wanted the cottage to meld into the woods and be visually quiet,” says architect Kelly Doran, who worked with Portico Timber Frames to build the 2,500-square-foot home.
An
The five-stall horse barn has been recently updated.
A-Frame Entrance and Facade
The gabled roof on Enough House puts it in conversation with the adjacent Troop barn and Cheboque schoolhouse, but its Cor-Ten steel exterior makes it a unique addition to Shobac.
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
A private gate fronts the entrance to Red Oak Manor.
The familiarity and warmth of the burned finish juxtapose the more contemporary fritted glass that wraps around the corner of the building.
The Case Study homes were built between 1945 and 1966 and were commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine to create inexpensive and replicable model homes to accommodate the residential housing boom in the United States caused by the flood of returning soldiers at the end of World War II.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.