109 Exterior Shingles Roof Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

3767 Barrington Drive features a classic Eichler profile and an inviting bright orange front door.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.
A look at the lovely nature-filled backyard.
Every year Marlboro College, which is located in rural Vermont, hosts the Marlboro Music Festival in which 80 of the most prominent classical musicians join together and work to hone their craft. For seven weeks, they work, live, and rehearse together and also host select public performances. Since its inception in 1951, the program has steadily welcomed more people to participate, outgrowing its accommodations. Enter architects Joan Soranno and John Cook of HGA who developed five site-specific cabins that tread lightly on the land and respect the festival's roots. Soranno and Cook created deceptively simple-looking structures that update the regional vernacular. 

"In Marlboro, you get a different way of not only looking at the world, but also looking at life," stated Mitsuko Uchida, the festival's current artistic director, in a release. "If you spend weeks together, day in and day out, eating meals together, chatting and sitting around, you begin to get the basic outline of what it means to be a musician. Ultimately Marlboro is about the concept of time. We have time to rehearse and time simply to think."
With one side of the house closed off, views are directed through the glazed south and west facades to the grassy clearing beyond. "We planted tens of thousands of blue bells and lots of rhododendrons," Oostenbruggen says of the green space. "The setting developed over time."
Building atop the foundation of a previous greenhouse was a cost-cutting measure; it allowed the project to be considered a renovation and thereby qualify for a temporary tax reduction. Its traditional, gabled form also pays homage to the original structure.
The exterior of The Great Barn.
The expansive property from above.
The garage door was replaced with a new entry to the building, featuring a custom steel canopy over the front door. The door is painted Benjamin Moore Flamingo's Dream to better contrast with the black-stained, tight-knot vertical cedar siding.
The architects worked with the natural, six-foot slope of the site and built the Granny Pad into the hill to gain the needed interior height. The volume on the right is the original garage footprint, which now houses a kitchen and sitting room. The added volume on the left hosts the bedroom, as well as a bathroom beneath the loft space.
The architects expanded the building to a total of 571 square feet. The rear entry, shown here, accesses a loft space that is currently used for storage. In the future, the loft might become an office or additional sleeping quarters, depending on the homeowners' needs.
The new homes complement the existing residential scale in this downtown Orlando neighborhood.
The exterior of the Aspire House is built of concrete blocks with a Portland cement plaster (stucco) finish.
The well-preserved midcentury home sits on a half-acre lot near the Knollwood Country Club in Granada Hills. The lot features a gorgeous outdoor space that includes a sprawling lawn, a covered patio, and a swimming pool and spa.
The outdoor space has been landscaped with synthetic turf, as well as drought-tolerant plants.
Located in Sierra Madre, California, an existing ranch home with clean architectural geometry, was transformed into a contemporary home with an expanded open floor plan, improved circulation and access, and carefully placed clerestory windows. On the exterior, revised garage orientation eliminates excessive driveway paving and reestablishes the front yard as usable space.
A new 50-years cedar shake roof with copper flashing was installed just last year.
The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.
Since the council wouldn't allow off-street parking or a dedicated crossover, the architects created a "hidden" sliding side gate (seen open in this image) to provide vehicle access if needed.
A look at the exterior of the cabin.
Set on a half-acre lot, this updated 1963 midcentury home is located in the heart of La Cañada Flintridge in the Los Angeles area.
The 31-foot cabin includes a four-foot spire.
The roof insulation is rigid, waterproof material that Witzling placed on the outside in order to leave the roof framing exposed on the inside. The metal roof has a layer of chicken wire, with moss harvested from the property stuffed into it to create a weathered-looking green roof.
In summer, the living area is surrounded by grass that covers the terrain. Yet, once winter comes, this same area appears to be nestled within a blanket of snow.
The home has warm interiors throughout and boasts a minimalist, cabin-like aesthetic.
The classic post-and-beam construction is highlighted on the exterior.
Beautifully renovated, the home has excellent curb appeal with low maintenance landscaping.
The traditional facade does little to hint at the apartment's modern aesthetic.
A look at the contemporary facade post renovation. The new standing steel roof and siding of one of the wings references the cathedral spire in the village below.
"Upon arrival, you enter straight off Abbott Kinney into a calm room where members check in," Sutherland says. "The interior is simple, elegant, and inviting."
Exterior view of master bedroom and master bath
Exterior view of main entry
A perpendicular wing houses the garage. The house has no air conditioning, relying on lake breezes and cross-ventilation for cooling. Each bedroom has a screened door that opens to the deck and an adjustable transom above the hallway door to encourage the circulation of air.
The white board-and-batten facade takes cues from the surrounding stables and is surrounded by billowing grass and birch trees.
With its courtyard and walled garden, the abandoned structure was once part of a larger Irish estate that included an early 19th-century home.
The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
Here is the lovely home at dusk.
The cedar shingles—common to local buildings—are scaled up to the size of the boards to cover the roof and sidewalls.
Each structure has an independent mechanical system so it can be shut down when not in use.
As with connected farms, the limited material palette unifies the various spaces.
The separate volumes are unified in their external appearance.
From the courtyard, views extend straight through the home to the other side of the structure.
To instill the desired sense of comfort and peace, it was important that the design blend with the setting and local building traditions.
The first-floor cantilevers out and is perched like a platform, serving as a great viewpoint for observing the surrounding forest scenery.
Rather than create a typical two-story home, the architects have designed a multi-layered space with a series of platforms.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
The gabled roof ridge is parallel to the hill.
The roof was built with prefabricated wood elements.
The home is equipped with solar water heating.
The expansive property contains an extensive forest and trail system.
The home is naturally integrated into its bucolic setting.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.