85 Exterior Shingles Roof Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The traditional facade does little to hint at the apartment's modern aesthetic.
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
A look at the contemporary facade post renovation. The new standing steel roof and siding of one of the wings references the cathedral spire in the village below.
"Upon arrival, you enter straight off Abbott Kinney into a calm room where members check in," Sutherland says. "The interior is simple, elegant, and inviting."
Exterior view of master bedroom and master bath
Exterior view of main entry
A perpendicular wing houses the garage. The house has no air conditioning, relying on lake breezes and cross-ventilation for cooling. Each bedroom has a screened door that opens to the deck and an adjustable transom above the hallway door to encourage the circulation of air.
The white board-and-batten facade takes cues from the surrounding stables and is surrounded by billowing grass and birch trees.
With its courtyard and walled garden, the abandoned structure was once part of a larger Irish estate that included an early 19th-century home.
The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
All windows and doors have been custom-designed and fitted with aluminum framing.
Here is the lovely home at dusk.
The cedar shingles—common to local buildings—are scaled up to the size of the boards to cover the roof and sidewalls.
Each structure has an independent mechanical system so it can be shut down when not in use.
As with connected farms, the limited material palette unifies the various spaces.
The separate volumes are unified in their external appearance.
From the courtyard, views extend straight through the home to the other side of the structure.
To instill the desired sense of comfort and peace, it was important that the design blend with the setting and local building traditions.
The glazing faces the lake, providing privacy from the road.
The first-floor cantilevers out and is perched like a platform, serving as a great viewpoint for observing the surrounding forest scenery.
Rather than create a typical two-story home, the architects have designed a multi-layered space with a series of platforms.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
The gabled roof ridge is parallel to the hill.
The roof was built with prefabricated wood elements.
The home is equipped with solar water heating.
The expansive property contains an extensive forest and trail system.
The home is naturally integrated into its bucolic setting.
The northern façade of the main house is set at an angle to the barn
The design of the 3890-square-foot main residence and its adjacent barn have been executed with the highest degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail, drawing from traditional influences and the vernacular of the rural northeast.
The design of the 3890-square-foot main residence and its adjacent barn have been executed with the highest degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail, drawing from traditional influences and the vernacular of the rural northeast.
Vestigial stone walls that remain throughout the property, almost echoing the home's poetic use of stone.
The gabled roof on Enough House puts it in conversation with the adjacent Troop barn and Cheboque schoolhouse, but its Cor-Ten steel exterior makes it a unique addition to Shobac.
A private gate fronts the entrance to Red Oak Manor.
The familiarity and warmth of the burned finish juxtapose the more contemporary fritted glass that wraps around the corner of the building.
The house’s materials are also influenced by Bavarian-alpine traditions — mainly larchwood in form of tongue-and-groove boards for the façade and as shingles on the roof.

Photo by Sebastian Schels
“The stable/garage was built with two intersecting gable roof forms," Schaer says, which didn't match up with the inteiror spaces within. “In order to provide a unified, singular main space, we dropped a flat ceiling at the entrance and linked it up with the main gable visible from the street.”
This renovation was designed for a young family by Glasgow-based architect Andrew McAvoy of Assembly Architecture. McAvoy followed the original U-shape of the former residence by building two new energy-efficient houses, the first of which combines the original granite building with a new extension to provide an open-plan living area and three bedrooms.
The brick exterior of the main house.
A wood trellis offers coverage and marks the entry to this 700-square-foot cottage ADU.
© Vojteck Ketz courtesy of Marta Nowicka & Co.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
bank of double-hung windows in old garage
front entry door
Wynants grew up sailing, and he created the piece to suggest “a moment of togetherness...the way one might gather at the back of the boat, to talk and drink.” A side view of the house captures a glimpse of what he calls “the monolith.”
“If you want to respect the old, the contrast should be brutal. I want to be very clear what is old and what is new.” —Dirk Wynants
The owner of this modern, two-bedroom holiday home in Germany’s Black Forest is a carpenter and joiner, so it’s no surprize that wood is the star the design. Most of the wood for the core structure and interior finishings of the house were sourced from the nearby beech and pine forest.
The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
The 1912 Craftsman bungalow appears unchanged from the street, part of Cheng and Snyder’s strategy to maintain the neighborhood’s existing architectural character and appease local preservationists. A dark-gray finish from Glidden custom matches the home’s original color and contrasts with the bright interiors.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.