75 Exterior Shingles Roof Material Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

The exterior terrace, water channel, deck, and window wall of Matt and Jon Andersen-Miller's renovated midcentury home.
The material palette consists of concrete, bleached flooring, pine plywood, and lots of matte black and white.
This stunning forest retreat in England uses prefabricated panels to minimize site impact, shorten construction time, and protect against weather.
Built for $148,500, Casa Montaña was manufactured in a Madrid factory before being assembled in a mountainous, coastal region in Northwestern Spain.
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named "Ufogel," which is a melding of the acronym UFO and "vogel," meaning bird in German.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.
A wooden home nestled amongst a cluster of Japanese larch trees offers a perfect sanctuary from nearby Tokyo. Chubu, Japan. By Koji Tsutsui & Associates from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Every year Marlboro College, which is located in rural Vermont, hosts the Marlboro Music Festival in which 80 of the most prominent classical musicians join together and work to hone their craft. For seven weeks, they work, live, and rehearse together and also host select public performances. Since its inception in 1951, the program has steadily welcomed more people to participate, outgrowing its accommodations. Enter architects Joan Soranno and John Cook of HGA who developed five site-specific cabins that tread lightly on the land and respect the festival's roots. Soranno and Cook created deceptively simple-looking structures that update the regional vernacular. 

"In Marlboro, you get a different way of not only looking at the world, but also looking at life," stated Mitsuko Uchida, the festival's current artistic director, in a release. "If you spend weeks together, day in and day out, eating meals together, chatting and sitting around, you begin to get the basic outline of what it means to be a musician. Ultimately Marlboro is about the concept of time. We have time to rehearse and time simply to think."
With one side of the house closed off, views are directed through the glazed south and west facades to the grassy clearing beyond. "We planted tens of thousands of blue bells and lots of rhododendrons," Oostenbruggen says of the green space. "The setting developed over time."
Subtle features incorporated into the design, including an elevated terrace and jetty, help the home float above the island.
Building atop the foundation of a previous greenhouse was a cost-cutting measure; it allowed the project to be considered a renovation and thereby qualify for a temporary tax reduction. Its traditional, gabled form also pays homage to the original structure.
The house may appear conventional at a glance, but a closer look shows how Oostenbruggen has pushed the boundaries of the traditional gabled typology. It has an asymmetrical roof, with slate shingles that extend down the eastern side to close it off completely.
Gently sloping roofs reach towards the water to the west, and the mountains to the east, reacting to the scenery adjacent to it.
The home fully embraces the natural setting, reaching out and embracing the natural wonders.
The two, season-specific wings of the L-shaped plan are separated by a covered breezeway.
A look at the exterior of the cabin.
The 31-foot cabin includes a four-foot spire.
Set on an 80-square-foot irregular pentagonal base, and built with 100-percent recycled materials, this cabin is 17 feet long, 11 feet tall, and seven feet wide at its widest point. It has a small, 30-square-foot loft.
Witzling's life partner, model and actress Sara Underwood, explores Cabin 4.
"I used the same roofing concept on this cabin as I did with the second, covering it in metal, chicken wire and moss," says Witzling.
The roof insulation is rigid, waterproof material that Witzling placed on the outside in order to leave the roof framing exposed on the inside. The metal roof has a layer of chicken wire, with moss harvested from the property stuffed into it to create a weathered-looking green roof.
This cabin has a 100-square-foot lower level and a 70-square-foot loft. The cabin has a shed roof that rises as high as 22 feet.
Cabin designer and builder Jacob Witzling found inspiration in his architect father and childhood fairy tales.
Witzling, a second-grade teacher, makes most of his cabins for friends and family.
Jason Witzling first fell in love with cabin life when he was 16 years old.
In summer, the living area is surrounded by grass that covers the terrain. Yet, once winter comes, this same area appears to be nestled within a blanket of snow.
The home has warm interiors throughout and boasts a minimalist, cabin-like aesthetic.
After: As part of the redesign, the exterior of the cabin was painted black.
To evoke the feel of a tiny nature cabin, two massive sliding doors can be used to divide the common areas so that each section can be isolated from the rest of the house.
Erecting a modern cabin where a tool shed once stood became a family exercise for architect Jim Cutler and his daughter, Hannah, who worked with him on the design and build.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
A-Frame Entrance and Facade
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
The house’s materials are also influenced by Bavarian-alpine traditions — mainly larchwood in form of tongue-and-groove boards for the façade and as shingles on the roof.

Photo by Sebastian Schels
A-Frame Haus in Herber City, Utah.
Grant yourself the ultimate escape to the Grand Canyon State with this stunning 3-bedroom, 3.5-bathroom Flagstaff vacation rental cabin, which sleeps 10 guests comfortably. Chock-full of amenities and situated in a private scenic landscape.
Airbnb's fourth
The Jack Sparrow by Outlandish Holidays is located at Falmouth Bay, perhaps explaining the etymology of its name. Bring your own rum.
Enjoy peace, quiet, and beautiful views in Cazadero. Your own little triangle situated in the midst of the mighty redwoods (and only 45 minutes away from San Francisco). Light a fire, grab a book, and snuggle up in that inviting nook of a bedroom. For each rental, $50 is donated to Raphael House, a San Francisco organization whose goal is to help at-risk families achieve stable housing and financial independence.
Van Beek’s extra space is home to her office. She works on a Tense table by Piergiorgio and Michele Cazzaniga and Flow chairs by Jean Marie Massaud, both for MDF Italia.
Architect Paolo Caravello of Helsinki-based practice Void created this prism-shaped house near a lake in Sysmä, Finland, with a glass-topped pyramidal roof that transformed the top level of the house into a fully glazed observatory where its owners can look out to stunning views of the nature outdoors.
The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.