304 Dining Room Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Kitchen table, Danish design from the 70s.
A Wintercheck Factory Light sits atop a credenze by Wüd Furniture.
A steel fireplace lies between the dining space and open kitchen.
They installed walnut cabinetry and vertical boards made of clear western cedar with a simple oil finish.
The concrete walls, floors, and ceilings are raw and exposed, creating a modern, industrial-inspired canvas.
“With a crackling fire that heats the hot tub, solar panels, cisterns, Murphy bed, shower and compost toilet, this off-grid structure is virtually maintenance-free, and should look and function the same 100 years from now,” says GreenSpur founder Mark Turner.
The kitchen was sunk down a few steps to better define it from the rest of the living spaces, while built-in, Douglas Fir cabinetry maximizes and streamlines storage. The custom Douglas Fir table is by ZZ Contracting.
The dining space. The Joules midcentury modern chandelier was ordered from Etsy.
A former factory for Alexander Thomson & Sons Pattern Makers—a company that made wooden forms which were then cast in metal for propellers—this old building now has a new second floor and an excavated cellar, which has increased its floor space from 3,500 square feet to a whooping 8,500 square feet.
The cooking/dining space is the heart of the house, and is open to the elements.
A view from the outside highlights the home's timber frame.
A skylight was added over the dining table to further increase the amount of natural lighting. A bridge between new and old was created by using the timber from a beam that was removed where the kitchen opens to the dining area.
Cowan and Rummy wanted to keep as much of the cross-laminated timber exposed as possible. The team treated the timber with an oil that protects it from UV light and everyday dirt.
Almost all of the cottage's structural elements and internal divisions are made from cross-laminated timber. The only exception is a large wooden beam that runs the length of the apex. The home's windows and doors are by Velfac.
Standing within the conservatory, a glass floor allows one to see through to the wine cellar below, which is accessible via a seamlessly integrated trap door.
The dining room connects to the kitchen.
The wine cellar can be seen through the glass section of the floor.
In warm summer months, the automated glass façade opens up the conservatory, creating an outside patio that draws and circulates natural breezes throughout the house.
When the glass partitions are open, the passive heat from the conservatory is then released into the adjoining living spaces.
For the dining nook, Woodline Design created a custom table and banquette featuring cushions wrapped in Great Outdoors Shale fabric. The chairs are the Harp 349 by Roda. The "Fresh Crabs" sign adds a beachy, folk art feel.
The triangulated floor plan centers around a single, double-height space, and features an open-plan kitchen, living, and dining area on the ground level.
Built-in buffets are a standout feature of the dining room.
The sun-drenched dining nook.
A look at the dining area.
Horner replaced the closed storage with custom, open shelving that now connects to the entry, increasing natural light and sight lines throughout the house.
The teak dining table is by IB Koford-Larsen for G-Plan and the chairs are by Victor Bramwell Wilkins for G-Plan.
In the dining area sits Finn Juhl 109 chairs, a bespoke table, as well as a chandelier from Flos. There is also a Le Corbusier painting on the wall.
Expansive oak-framed pivot doors frame views of the rear garden, and also form a functional extension to the kitchen for dining, socializing, and play.
At the heart of the extension is a new kitchen and dining area.
The family dogs, Lola and Nina, hunt for scraps under a dining table that Regan made. The sliding door is by Milgard.
Keeping the region’s temperate climate in mind, the architects have inserted sliding doors and operable windows throughout the home to enable ventilation and decrease the need for air conditioning.
Generous glazing mimics the experience of dining outdoors.
The different levels act as a topographic map to guide one through the common areas.
The layout includes an interesting interplay of levels.
A staircase connects the dining area and kitchen on the ground floor to the bedroom on the upper level.
A pullout dining table is concealed within one of the white kitchen panels.
"Our design fulfilled the fundamental concern to create a connection to place, capture site and distant views, while providing humble protection from the elements," the architects note.
Stone and concrete combine to create a stark, clean aesthetic that beautifully complements and contrasts the rugged landscape.
Inside the home, a simple, neutral color scheme harmonizes with warm natural oak, walnut wood, and dramatic black steel details.
POOL / GOURMET AREA
The shutter-like doors allow the owner to control the amount of light and heat entering the house during diferent times of the year.
Detailing for the open shelves next to dining area allows for the interplay of light and shadow.
The 111 House is designed to be open, bright and modern. With an open floor plan it's great for relaxing, socializing or using as a home base as you explore Portland, Oregon.
A gray table, mint-green pendant lamp, and blue dining chairs are located in the dining area.
The dinning area
The vegan pizza and ice cream bar features a reclaimed wood counter, dark green Muuto Nerd stools, and Clé tile on the stair risers.
The four-sided fireplace composed of travertine and steel is a focal point for the living and dining areas.
The kitchen bookends an open-plan layout that also includes a dining area and living room. Full-height windows help create a sense of spaciousness and open the living areas to the backyard.
Rather than treating the concrete walls, Morrison hung a massive painting by her brother to give the dining room depth.
By saving money on her dining table, which is a piece of walnut countertop from IKEA, Morrison was able to budget for splurges like a bespoke, pink velvet sofa from Anthropologie. The artwork is by her brother, who also happens to be her roommate.

The modern dining room is where the universal ritual of breaking bread brings us together. The projects below showcase elegant configurations and designs that encompass chairs and tables, bars and stools, lighting, flooring, and fireplaces.