251 Dining Room Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Meals can be taken al fresco or in the dining room. Locally sourced ceramics and wood pieces are found throughout the home.
For Tea Bar, Swanson chose lighting from local outfit Schoolhouse Electric, including the Isaac Pendent.
The communal table was designed by Bright Designlab and fabricated by Reed LaPlant.
Above the bar, a large photo of Keith Richards floating in a swimming pool is juxtaposed against the pale colors and caramel leather scheme, conjuring a fun, rock-and-roll vibe.
Handmade leather Fernando chairs by Jayson Home surround a live-edge custom walnut table by Ben Riddering in the dining area.
Double-glazed windows open the home up to the permaculture garden outside and northern sunlight. The kitchen is visible from nearly every room in the home.
In the dining room next to the study is a deep window seat inserted on the north side of the home that overlooks the outdoor deck.
Indoor/outdoor living was a priority in the redesign, and the interior was reconfigured so that views of the backyard and the majestic gum tree can be immediately seen as soon as the front door is opened.
Recycled timbers are used throughout the home from the curved bench to the joinery in the kitchen. The kitchen also connects to a cold-store walk-in pantry that’s cooled with an in-slab ventilation pipe funneling cool under-house air.
The new kitchen-living area is spanned by a 25-foot steel beam.
In the kitchen/dining area, the range hood and cooktop are by Fisher & Paykel; the Navy chairs are by Emeco.
The courtyard’s board-formed concrete retaining wall extends indoors and has niches for growing herbs.
Three levels intermix within the small footprint of the home, creating a loft-like feeling.
The communal area enjoys a close connection to the outdoors through a Duratherm lift-roll door. Beneath artworks by Christopher Flach, Cherner armchairs are paired with a Tulip table from Knoll.
Dining room into Atrium
An overview of the first-floor living space. Despite the dark color palette, the home is still able to find plenty of light with the full-height sliding doors.
Perforated black panels became a recurring theme throughout the home. For instance, here they are employed on the walls of the kitchen.
The full-height sliding glass doors have been added to mediate the threshold between the garden and house.
Interior view toward breakfast area
Entry courtyard to the right and dinning room in the front flanked by covered glass patio.
Dining room with a covered patio and fabric curtain(open position) for privacy and harsh south sun.
A chandelier by Lindsey Adelman hangs overhead. The floor-to-ceiling windows throughout are by Fleetwood Windows.
For the B&B, the architects have retained the sectional proportions of the existing buildings.
A custom California Closet (right) partitions the entry and the kitchen, providing the family with additional storage space.
The house has floors of burnished concrete, providing thermal mass in the cooler months. The cement retains heat from the sun during the day and then slowly releases it back into the atmosphere to warm the interiors in the evening.
"As with a tree, we tried to create organic architecture that could be formed by a hierarchical combination of different parts, such as plants, pleats as openings, and concrete boxes," explains Hirata.
For ventilation, many of the valley-facing windows, measuring 10 ½ feet tall, feature a section at the top or bottom that opens. Navy 111 chairs, part of Emeco’s Coca-Cola edition, sit at the heads of a Restoration Hardware table; WAC track lights provide illumination. The floors are made of poured-in-place concrete.
The home references Singapore's lush outdoors with an abundance of natural light, greenery, and timber.
In the open plan kitchen, dining room, and living room, the materials palette was kept very simple and restrained, with a burnished concrete floor, kitchen island composed of unfinished concrete block, and plywood cabinets. A pantry sheathed in vertical planks of contrasting wood anchors the open space.
On the ground level, the kitchen is reached by stepping down toward the back of the home, ultimately leading out to a rear yard.
The main entrance to the house is located off the street through a vestibule that leads into the main living area, which includes the living, kitchen, and dining rooms.
A former factory for Alexander Thomson & Sons Pattern Makers—a company that made wooden forms which were then cast in metal for propellers—this old building now has a new second floor and an excavated cellar, which has increased its floor space from 3,500 square feet to a whooping 8,500 square feet.
A fire pit and small courtyard lie directly adjacent to the dining space.
Mainly open in plan, a two-sided fireplace with an open flute quietly divides the spaces on the main floor.
Brick was also used in the interior to lend a sense of warmth.
The open-plan living area on the ground floor of the new building is fitted with large windows that frame tranquil views of the lake.
Operable full-height glazing opens the dining room up on both sides.
"We did not simply copy traditional elements for Hopper House, but used them as input to analyze, arrange, and create the program for the new house," says Hung.
Hung Dao, founder of AHL, designed the patios, thresholds, inner yards, and roofs with proportions that echo those of traditional Northern Vietnamese dwellings, but updated them to improve functionality.
Nakada works from an Alvar Aalto table in the living and dining area, adjacent to the kitchen. He saved on some elements, such as the plywood cabinetry, and splurged on others, such as the Finn Juhl chairs and Vilhelm Lauritzen lamp. A skylight beneath the angled roof allows in a sliver of constantly changing light.
The spacious dining area overlooks the open living room and the surrounding greenery.
A dining table fits into a nook on the side of the kitchen referencing the mess area on the yachts on which the owner works. Above the table is a sleeping platform accessed by a long ladder also adding a ship-like feel. <span style=
The wall of windows is original, while the floor received new concrete. Horner also specified a new stove and hood, as well as a new backsplash in large, textured field tile from The Surface Store in Portland.
The fireproofing material that the architects used to cover the steel girders give them the textural appearance of roughened concrete.
Within the open plan living-dining-kitchen space, they created a second ceiling in the form of three brick arcs that extend from one girder to the next, with each gentle arc rising over one of the functional zones.
The apartment’s floor plan consists of two parallel spaces, so the architects designated one section for the common areas, and the other for the two bedrooms, dressing room, and bathroom.
Passageways were carefully planned to present intriguing interior perspectives.
The view from the kitchen is as lively as it is light, taking in the dining area, tiny courtyard garden, and the separate office building backed by the jumble of old buildings to the rear. The rustic dining chairs are by Börge Mogensen from Karl Andersson & Söner.
The ground floor consists of two zones—a northern wing where the open-plan kitchen, dining room, and living area are located, as well as a western wing, which houses the four bedrooms.
This 7,072-square-feet, two-story house consists of 80 tsubos, which were re-organized to accommodate modern living.
In traditional Japanese architecture, spaces are divided into "tsubos," a Japanese unit of floor area that’s the equivalent to approximately 35.58 square feet.

The modern dining room is where the universal ritual of breaking bread brings us together. The projects below showcase elegant configurations and designs that encompass chairs and tables, bars and stools, lighting, flooring, and fireplaces.