66 Dining Room Concrete Floors Shelves Design Photos And Ideas

Sarah Butler and Mel Elias’s Siberian husky, Rooney, reclines in the renovated dining room of their Los Angeles home. The raised floor provides easy access to mechanical systems, something the house lacked as originally built.
During the 2019 renovation, the building’s floors were refinished with Ardex. "In the process, two layers of color were added, which brought so much depth," says Ali.
The chairs in the Izquierdo family’s dining room were designed by Cristián’s father, who is also an architect.
A small dining area is located behind the living area. A plaster wall separates the dining and living space from the kitchen. The decision was made to create dividing "panels" rather than full walls to maintain a sense of openness throughout the home and to allow for the layering of the couple’s collection of objects.
Where they could reuse original fittings and fixtures, they did, painting Bakelite handles and repurposing industrial, warehouse-style pendants found on-site. “We used whatever we could, and didn’t throw things out. Even the front door that was being thrown out by the neighbor next door (who was also renovating), Rose saved.” says Szczerbicki.
A flourishing garden grows inside this glass-roofed Victorian home in Melbourne. The skylight creates a sunny space to dine while warm wood tones accentuate this nature-inspired abode.
The living and dining rooms have custom built-in cabinetry by Alula Woodworks.
The house is largely furnished with pieces already owned by the couple, including the Eames Wire Chair DKR with Eiffel base used around the dining table. “The furniture all works together to create an eclectic mix,” says designer Jamie Chioco.
Responsive sliding shade awnings shield the interior from too much sun. In seconds, the shades can be remotely closed to provide almost 100% protection from UV rays.
A garden is integrated into a green bench seat, optimizing space in the dining area while drawing the outdoors in.
Hudson-Smith builds furniture to stay connected to the pleasure of creating something tangible, including this dining table.
“We did a lot of things for us that some clients are hesitant to do, like shou sugi ban. Our idea is that the house and materials will weather over time. They will change, but that’s part of the beauty of it,” says Maria. Here, the double wall lamps are by DCW Editions. Real Good Chairs in copper line by Blu Dot surround the wooden table by Ethnicraft.
Located on a wooded property some 80 miles north of New York City, the Pond House is the weekend hangout for Kyle Page, founder of Brooklyn-based architecture firm Sundial Studios and his family. Perched atop a concrete plinth, it features weathered steel cladding and blackened cedar siding. Glass doors and a covered porch stepping down to the pond add another dash of indoor/outdoor synergy, while the interiors are awash in natural materials like sugar maple and fallen ash.
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Inside, a grand central hall retains much of the original barn-like interior. The original redwood paneling lines the double-height space, which also includes a spiral staircase leading to a loft.
In the dining area, Zuiver side chairs pull up to a vintage wood table that was previously used in an art school in Amsterdam. The knitted pendants were crafted by resident Marjon Helder.
In the dining area, a custom birch bookcase is inset into a partial wall of brick that was salvaged from the previous house that stood on the lot.
Much of the furniture— including the nine-foot dining table created from a single slab of a fallen Guanacaste tree—was custom made by local millworker HDM. The Eames Molded chairs are from Herman Miller, and the pendant light from IKEA.
Expansive doors open the the kitchen up to the forest on two sides.
Resting gently on slender beams and posts, the original tongue-and-groove ceiling embodies the purest expression of form and function.
Wright crafted the dining table and chairs out of Philippine mahogany and and fabric-covered, foam cushions. All of the furniture designed by Wright in the home is also included in the sale.
The home has three different roof levels. Ceilings are composed of modular concrete blocks and the red concrete is scored to resemble tiles throughout.
To provide privacy without putting up light-obstructing walls, the architects installed curtains that can be pulled along curved tracks in the bedrooms and bathrooms.
Enhanced by views of the landscape, the flexible dining room table doubles as a workspace.
Objects, from a skateboard to tableware to books, give the dining room a curated boutique hotel lobby feel. The spider chandelier is another highlight.
Massaro hired Connecticut craftsmen to create the Wrightian furnishings, doors, and windows.
The walls studded with locally sourced granite rocks throughout the home are meant to be in the likeness of Wright's "desert masonry" style but have garnered criticism from purists who say the rocks should sit flush. Massaro says that was impossible due to building codes and insulation requirements.
Double-glazed windows open the home up to the permaculture garden outside and northern sunlight. The kitchen is visible from nearly every room in the home.
The dining room.
Large openings create the feeling of being outdoors, while remaining protected inside.
The dining area, which is just off the kitchen, features a built-in banquette.
The kitchen was sunk down a few steps to better define it from the rest of the living spaces, while built-in, Douglas Fir cabinetry maximizes and streamlines storage. The custom Douglas Fir table is by ZZ Contracting.
The wine cellar can be seen through the glass section of the floor.
When the glass partitions are open, the passive heat from the conservatory is then released into the adjoining living spaces.
Horner replaced the closed storage with custom, open shelving that now connects to the entry, increasing natural light and sight lines throughout the house.
Detailing for the open shelves next to dining area allows for the interplay of light and shadow.
The vegan pizza and ice cream bar features a reclaimed wood counter, dark green Muuto Nerd stools, and Clé tile on the stair risers.
Indoor/outdoor living was a priority in the redesign, and the interior was reconfigured so that views of the backyard and the majestic gum tree can be immediately seen as soon as the front door is opened.
Recycled timbers are used throughout the home from the curved bench to the joinery in the kitchen. The kitchen also connects to a cold-store walk-in pantry that’s cooled with an in-slab ventilation pipe funneling cool under-house air.
In the kitchen/dining area, the range hood and cooktop are by Fisher & Paykel; the Navy chairs are by Emeco.
The home references Singapore's lush outdoors with an abundance of natural light, greenery, and timber.
Now, the remodeled staircase features pine paneling and is painted white.
The built-in bookshelf was salvaged in the renovation, painted white, and now serves as a backdrop to the dining room area.
Ample natural light enters via the sliding hardwood screens, keeping the interiors bright and airy.
A narrow threshold evokes the warren-like feel of the original interiors.
The kitchen island is made from oxidized steel with a honed black marble benchtop. Cabinetry in blackbutt, an Australian hardwood known for its fire resistance, contrasts with the dark interiors.
The location for the new restaurant, which opened in February 2010, was a barn on the ranch that had been used as a plant nursery. "It wasn't an incredibly old barn," Johanson says. "It was built around the 1970s, but it was built with a very agricultural look." To stay true to its form, Johanson and her colleagues Mark Wilson, Catharine Tarver, and Bridie McSweeney decided to leave as much of the structure intact as possible, playing up the post-and-beam system and revealing the shape of the roof on the interior.
The dining table is original to the house.  A glass top now sits on top to preserve the surface from further wear and tear.   Very rare, H.W. Klein #250 dining chairs manufactured by Bramin complement the table.
The dining room is meant to be a flexible space for eating or dancing. “One of the most important things for me,” explains Grunbaum, “is how a house feels. It has to be a place where you don’t want to leave.” The Cyclone table is by Isamu Noguchi for Knoll and the pendant lamp is by Lightoiler.