216 Dining Room Concrete Floors Table Design Photos And Ideas

A chandelier by Lindsey Adelman hangs overhead. The floor-to-ceiling windows throughout are by Fleetwood Windows.
Handmade leather Fernando chairs by Jayson Home surround a live-edge custom walnut table in the dining area.
For the B&B, the architects have retained the sectional proportions of the existing buildings.
The house has floors of burnished concrete, providing thermal mass in the cooler months. The cement retains heat from the sun during the day and then slowly releases it back into the atmosphere to warm the interiors in the evening.
"As with a tree, we tried to create organic architecture that could be formed by a hierarchical combination of different parts, such as plants, pleats as openings, and concrete boxes," explains Hirata.
For ventilation, many of the valley-facing windows, measuring 10 ½ feet tall, feature a section at the top or bottom that opens. Navy 111 chairs, part of Emeco’s Coca-Cola edition, sit at the heads of a Restoration Hardware table; WAC track lights provide illumination. The floors are made of poured-in-place concrete.
The home references Singapore's lush outdoors with an abundance of natural light, greenery, and timber.
In the open plan kitchen, dining room, and living room, the materials palette was kept very simple and restrained, with a burnished concrete floor, kitchen island composed of unfinished concrete block, and plywood cabinets. A pantry sheathed in vertical planks of contrasting wood anchors the open space.
On the ground level, the kitchen is reached by stepping down toward the back of the home, ultimately leading out to a rear yard.
The main entrance to the house is located off the street through a vestibule that leads into the main living area, which includes the living, kitchen, and dining rooms.
A former factory for Alexander Thomson & Sons Pattern Makers—a company that made wooden forms which were then cast in metal for propellers—this old building now has a new second floor and an excavated cellar, which has increased its floor space from 3,500 square feet to a whooping 8,500 square feet.
A fire pit and small courtyard lie directly adjacent to the dining space.
Mainly open in plan, a two-sided fireplace with an open flute quietly divides the spaces on the main floor.
Brick was also used in the interior to lend a sense of warmth.
The open-plan living area on the ground floor of the new building is fitted with large windows that frame tranquil views of the lake.
Operable full-height glazing opens the dining room up on both sides.
"We did not simply copy traditional elements for Hopper House, but used them as input to analyze, arrange, and create the program for the new house," says Hung.
Hung Dao, founder of AHL, designed the patios, thresholds, inner yards, and roofs with proportions that echo those of traditional Northern Vietnamese dwellings, but updated them to improve functionality.
Nakada works from an Alvar Aalto table in the living and dining area, adjacent to the kitchen. He saved on some elements, such as the plywood cabinetry, and splurged on others, such as the Finn Juhl chairs and Vilhelm Lauritzen lamp. A skylight beneath the angled roof allows in a sliver of constantly changing light.
The spacious dining area overlooks the open living room and the surrounding greenery.
A dining table fits into a nook on the side of the kitchen referencing the mess area on the yachts on which the owner works. Above the table is a sleeping platform accessed by a long ladder also adding a ship-like feel. <span style=
The wall of windows is original, while the floor received new concrete. Horner also specified a new stove and hood, as well as a new backsplash in large, textured field tile from The Surface Store in Portland.
The fireproofing material that the architects used to cover the steel girders give them the textural appearance of roughened concrete.
Within the open plan living-dining-kitchen space, they created a second ceiling in the form of three brick arcs that extend from one girder to the next, with each gentle arc rising over one of the functional zones.
The apartment’s floor plan consists of two parallel spaces, so the architects designated one section for the common areas, and the other for the two bedrooms, dressing room, and bathroom.
Passageways were carefully planned to present intriguing interior perspectives.
The view from the kitchen is as lively as it is light, taking in the dining area, tiny courtyard garden, and the separate office building backed by the jumble of old buildings to the rear. The rustic dining chairs are by Börge Mogensen from Karl Andersson & Söner.
The ground floor consists of two zones—a northern wing where the open-plan kitchen, dining room, and living area are located, as well as a western wing, which houses the four bedrooms.
This 7,072-square-feet, two-story house consists of 80 tsubos, which were re-organized to accommodate modern living.
In traditional Japanese architecture, spaces are divided into "tsubos," a Japanese unit of floor area that’s the equivalent to approximately 35.58 square feet.
Now, the remodeled staircase features pine paneling and is painted white.
The built-in bookshelf was salvaged in the renovation, painted white, and now serves as a backdrop to the dining room area.
“The hope has been to combine archaic and modern elements in a way that would enhance the beauty of each by virtue of its contrast with the other.” —Tom Givone
The concrete wall mimics the slope of the hill outside as a reference to early Maori structures that were dug into the land. The simple kitchen has strandboard cabinetry and an MDF island that conceals a fireplace at one end. The ceramic works on the built-in seat at right are by Raewyn Atkinson and Robyn Lewis.
The dining area features a Snaregade Table by Norm Architects for Menu.
There used to be walls; now Barbara Hill's bed offers views not just of Houston, but also a French farm table surrounded by a sextet of black and white Harry Bertoia chairs for Knoll.
The dining table, made from a single piece of teak, is a little over 13 feet long and was custom made for the space. It can seat up to 24.
Filled with natural light and air-purifying plants, the two-bedroom abode boasts clean and contemporary character.
The dining area connects to an expansive viewing terrace.
A view from the kitchen. The use of white on the walls and ceilings combined with the glazing provide a great sense of space throughout.
Inside, white paint lightens up the middle of the building. A vintage Danish dining set and Cloud pendants by Frank Gehry for Vitra define the dining area.
Hans J. Wegner Wishbone Chairs surround the large dining table on axis with the grand, exterior windows.
The extensive glazing provides a strong sense of the surrounding nature.
Each line is in communication with every other line: ceiling lines align with glazing patterns, while in the dining room the windows open together, a reference to the idea of a “machine for living.”
In the kitchen, a built-in timber breakfast booth is the perfect spot to enjoy the dappled morning sunlight.
A sliding door conceals an office/guestroom, laundry, pantry, and bathroom.
The open kitchen features a Richlite island countertop; the faucet is by Chicago Faucets. The draperies are from Restoration Hardware.
A Peter Ivy pendant hangs over the dining table and benches, also by Taku. At one end is a collection of candlesticks, prototypes for Tortoise that will be manufactured in Hokkaido.  The simple wood treads on the open-riser staircase complement the unfinished ceiling beams.
Sliders open to a deck and beyond to a 1960s Airstream once owned by sculptor Alma Allen in Joshua Tree. The couple use it for guests.
Rich’s wife, Andrea Hotere, is the daughter of New Zealand artist Ralph Hotere. A piece from his 1982 “Mungo” series hangs above a Hawke dining table by Simon James. The chairs are by Charles and Ray Eames for Vitra.
The kitchen/dining room is lined in knotty cedar planks. A pair of Danish modern chairs face  a cowhide rug—a family heirloom.
The couple relax in their open-plan kitchen with their twelve-year-old lab, Uma.
The family sits around, and under in the case of four-year-old Kaz’ma, the sunken table for a snack. Makiko made the covers of the mats her mother sent from Japan by hand. The black lamp is from Ikea.

The modern dining room is where the universal ritual of breaking bread brings us together. The projects below showcase elegant configurations and designs that encompass chairs and tables, bars and stools, lighting, flooring, and fireplaces.