467 Living Room Console Tables Design Photos And Ideas

An imposing, matte black fireplace is the focal point of the living room. Wood is stored within the structure, which frees up floor space for abundant guest seating.
The main entry flows into the living room, which now accesses the outdoor terrace via the door to the left.
"Lighting was orchestrated to move with the time of day, so that as the sun sets, the outside would be felt," says Peace.
For outdoor enthusiasts Bob and Pam Norton, the town of Big Sky, Montana, was a natural choice for the location of their second home. Having purchased a remote lot with views of Lone Peak, Pioneer Mountain, and Cedar Mountain, they envisioned a private, year-round retreat that integrated with the terrain. “We wanted to live in the view,” says Pam. “We wanted the outdoors to come in.”
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.
The couch is a vintage Milo Baughman, along side the Bessarabian rug, also vintage.
A playful mixture of antiques and mid-century furnishings adds personality to the white-box interior of a cottage.
The guest house, offering an additional 500 square feet of living space, features a large, open area that doubles as both a living room and bedroom.
A new wood-panel wall is a focal point in the open layout. The original white oak floors were also refinished.
The interior is enlivened with yellow-painted doors and brightly colored geometric sconces that echo the home’s block siding.
A glass wall on the rear facade ties the compact home to the lush landscape and frames views of mountains, trees, and a lake.
The 2,000-square-foot events pavilion includes bathrooms, lounges, and a catering kitchen for food prep.
The insertion of an attic makes the most of the apartment’s tall ceilings as well as provides ample space for the family.
The exposed beams lend an industrial character to the home while emphasizing the linearity of the plan.
The most important aspect of a successful neutral palette? "Texture, texture, texture!," Pickens says.
Floor-to-ceiling glass runs along the entire front facade, providing expansive views of lush forests and the Mediterranean Sea in the distance. Polished concrete and natural wood dominate the minimalist aesthetic.
A tired midcentury in Eagle Rock with a chalky-green facade was transformed into a warm, contemporary home for a couple and their two daughters. The original single-level house had three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a small kitchen, a concrete deck in the backyard, and an above-ground swimming pool beside the guest house. "The first thing we did was put in white oak hardwood floors throughout the house, then add the Fleetwood sliding doors off of the living room. Eventually, we added a bedroom, extended the master bedroom and added an ensuite bathroom, enclosed the washer/dryer area, which expanded the kitchen, built a wood deck, wood fences, and then remodeled the guest house. No room was untouched by the time we were finished," says Matt, a woodworker and designer who is also the founder of L.A. handcrafted furniture brand Monroe Workshop.
Douglas fir floors and cedar wall and ceiling panelling create a warm atmosphere in the living room.
The kitchen looks out onto a large dining area and family room. Built-in bookcases flank one side of the space, while the opposite end is capped by expansive windows looking out onto the patio and garden.
The couple took their time cherry-picking furnishings, decor, and art.
Designed by Studio B Architecture + Interiors, this modern farmhouse in Aspen allows a couple’s art collection to shine with understated finishes and materials. Views and natural light were maximized via large spans of glass to instill a sense of airiness while the same wood used throughout the home added warmth. The minimalist interiors provide a muted canvas for their artifacts collected from travels to Africa and Indonesia, and art which includes 8-foot wooden sculptures, baskets from around the world, and Native American pieces including from R.C. Gorman.
The bucolic compound consists of two parcels of land with four houses—a main house and three guest houses—and a total of 12 bedrooms and 12 bathrooms in all.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls invite warm natural light into the 1,664-square-foot interior.
The 1952 dwelling that Greg Hoffman and his wife, Kirsten Brady, bought in Portland, Oregon, had many virtues. It had history (the first owner was an inventor who made stereoscopic devices), it had a strong architectural pedigree (it was designed by respected local architect Roscoe Hemenway), and above all, it had views. But, of course, it also had its flaws: the ceilings were low, the interior was chopped into a warren of rooms, and the windows weren’t exactly abundant. "We wanted open plans, more transparency, less tiny rooms," says Greg, the VP of global brand innovation at Nike. With the aid of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson—the 50-year-old architecture firm that is best known for the Fifth Avenue Apple store in New York City—the couple embarked on a project to enrich the landscaping, simplify the layout, and add a new top floor, all while amplifying the view with more glass. After a major renovation, the midcentury home with some of the best views in Portland, Oregon, took on a drastically new look.
Living Room
The palette and furnishings are inspired by nature and the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi. "We wanted people to feel relaxed right when they walked in, so we kept the interiors noble and focused on texture and subtleties in design," says Elaine. The living room features the Neva sofa by Sixpenny, a 19th-century Naga coffee table from India, and leather side chair from Restoration Hardware.
Italian designer Renzo Mongiardino revamped the 269-year-old property in the 1980s, enhancing the home's neoclassical and Middle Eastern design detailing.
Thirteen windows in the apartment help maximize the fantastic views. The seating—including a sectional from West Elm and daybed from BoConcept—is now complemented by a fireplace specified by the firm.
Built in 1955, the Koerner House was designed by renowned architect E. Stewart Williams, whose distinct midcentury modern style significantly shaped the Coachella Valley’s architectural landscape. Interiors feature Williams’ iconic architectural details, including natural teak wood paneling; built-in cabinetry, credenzas, and vanities; wood ceilings; slump stone walls and fireplace; clerestory windows; board-and-batten redwood siding; and original fixtures. The kitchen has been updated and renovated with modern appliances and stone countertops, but retains its original cabinetry.
Melding Gavankar's own artwork with sentimental keepsake items, the gallery wall is meant to be "autobiographical," says Cheng.
Janina Gavankar's playful personality is captured through such elements as a duo of swings and a Star Wars helmet, balanced by an imaginative, hand-painted mural.
The living room's modern, midcentury-inspired furniture comes courtesy of Rove Concepts.
Once the structure was completed, the walls and ceilings were insulated with wood (Gutex Cubierta), which the team implemented as a more natural and breathable alternative to a thermal bridge.
The guesthouse is intentionally pushed back in the homeowners’ backyard to create a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
The main living room has a SixPenny couch; Amazon Home goods including a console table and pillows; art by Julia Kostreva and Tucson-based Trevor Mock; custom bar by Fire on the Mesa; custom coffee table by Tucson woodworker Sam Okerlund; saguaro print by local photographer Emily Tartaglia; rugs by Pampa and Soukie Modern; Serena & Lily woven light fixtures; bar stools, woven coffee table, and hanging chair; Barnaby Lane lounge chairs; and pillows by Collective Sol, Spark Modern, Pampa, and Amazon Home.
Throughout the home, large picture windows frame views of the greenery outside, including glimpses of a 150-year-old oak tree the couple worked hard to save.
French doors by Jeld-Wen open the living room to the terrace and the landscape beyond. The mint-green shelving unit is original to Jon's grandparents' house, which originally stood on the property. "It holds much sentimental value," he says.
Front entry and living area.
Living room with hallway view to master bedroom.
The ideal cabin feature: a fireplace.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
The outside is brought in with double-height NLT (nail-laminated timber) ceilings and automated clerestory windows.
Oversized windows in the living area allow plenty of natural light to illuminate the home. Here, the plush sofa can also convert to a bed, allowing comfortable accommodations for overnight guests.
Living Room
Living Room
Nestled in a corner of the home, a quiet sitting area offers an idyllic place to rest and relax.
Having recently been treated to a thoughtful renovation, the reimagined 1961 midcentury offers residents and guests sophisticated balance, as well as a distinct modern allure.
PARLOR FLOOR - LIVING ROOM (DOORS CLOSED)
Photo © Ashok Sinha
IKEA's simple and modular designs can be personalized to suit your space.
An overview of the living room.
A gabled roof home in Werkhoven, a Dutch village in the province of Utrecht, takes the form of a modern barn with a twist—split down the middle from the peak, half of the exterior is floor-to-ceiling glass to take advantage of the views. "The transition from inside to outside, and vice versa, is always important in our designs," says architect Ruud Visser.
Via Media Residence by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Leonid Furmansky
Manhattan Daybed by Guy Rogers.
The living area—or “dance floor,” as the Womersley family called it—has an expansive feel, thanks to high ceilings and full-length windows.
The open floor plan, which blends dining and living spaces, is ideal for family or friendly gatherings. The 20-foot ceilings give the home a loft-like feel.
From the third floor, you can see 280-degree views.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.