100 Living Room Concrete Floors Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The studio also created the sliding wooden doors that open into the master bedroom.
Two sculptural wooden chairs face a wood-burning stove.
The living area boasts nearly 10-foot-high ceilings that impart a feeling of airiness and spaciousness. Discreet, built-in storage in the floor at the top of the steps prevents clutter from accumulating.
In the family room, "short ribbon windows were replaced with a wall of glass" for indoor/outdoor flow.
A new double-height fireplace column is the focal point of the new living room and underscores the room's graceful proportions.
Library
Fire Place
Room 1, located on the 2nd floor,  blends industrial detailing with exposed brick walls, polished concrete floors, rich textile finishes, and a custom walnut bed.
Like the other buildings onsite, John Hix designed Casa Solaris to take advantage of the natural forces here in Vieques; wind, sun and rain. By creating open spaces, where basically the fourth wall is missing, John created a space that takes advantage of the trade winds that flow through the Vieques hills. By placing the open wall towards the trade winds (to the East), the room is constantly cooled, leaving no need for air conditioning. Photo by Michael Grimm.
Low-impact materials were also used for the interior design, which is comprised primarily of concrete, glass, stone, wood, and steel. A palette of mostly light and neutral shades puts the attention on the views.
Living room with the fireplace
Interiors of Villa D.
The original built in sofa remains in the Living Room.  Ten foot windows draw nature inside while Maharam and Knoll textiles decorate the furnishings.
Living and dining spaces wrap around the full-height fireplace.  Original light fixtures remain and have been outfitted with LED lights.
The living room.
Entering the house.
In this remote holiday rental home in New Zealand, guests can warm themselves by the asymmetrically shaped fireplace while looking out to views of a gorgeous, deserted by.
The dining, kitchen, and living areas flow along one long gallery-like wing of the main house, creating an easy space to entertain in.
In the main house, large windows allow the forest to enter the living space, an effect opposite from its exterior presence.
Nolan and her buisness partner, Patrick Kennedy, strove for a practical structure that reads as a vacation house. They opted for prototypical materials, like cinder blocks for a privacy screen, to hit that note. “It has an association with old beach houses and public buildings at the shore,” Nolan says. After trying different self-supporting configurations, they chose a zigzag pattern. The wall shields the courtyard from wind and doubles as a step for gutter maintenance. During parties, the family likes to place candles into the recesses. “That wall’s got a little bit of poetry, but it’s also doing a few jobs as well.
living room with tall french doors
Meg Home | Olson Kundig
Meg Home | Olson Kundig
Meg Home | Olson Kundig
The main house features Africal mahogany woodwork custom-built to Wright’s specifications.
Large windows wrap around the homes' exterior and the home features six wood-burning fireplaces.
The living room includes a table from Normann Copenhagen, chairs by Annansilmät-Aitta, and Alvar Aalto’s A810 lamp for Artek, all on a poured concrete floor.
The sunken family room is enlivened by Alvarez-Calderón’s addition of fabrics from Designers Guild and glossy paint.
Furnished with vintage Eames chairs, a second-hand sofa, and pendants and tables designed by Nathalie, the space is kept purposefully casual. She painstakingly mixed and tested the paint for the mustard-yellow walls herself—15 times—to match the hue of a Kvadrat textile.
The couple often use the terrace for enjoying an espresso or aperitivo. Parentesi lights by Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzù for Flos hang next to one of the two entrances to the balcony.
Combining a prefab steel super-structure with concrete walls and insulated metal panels, Anthrazit House in Santa Barbara was designed by architects Pamela and Hector Magnus and built in collaboration with EcoSteel.“This wasn’t a traditional Santa Barbara site with large acreage,” Hector says. “It was small and steep.” Expansive windows on the second floor face a park.
Living room-VILLA CP
Credit: http://www.csphoto.net
Ivy Bertoia chair by the architect
Artwork and curated items by the architect
Living Room
Living Room
Interiors
The living room features a 250-square-foot configuration of Patricia Urquiola’s Tufty-Time sofa for B&B Italia. Overhead, as in the rest of the main living spaces, flush- mounted LED strips provide further demarcation of zones.
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Cupertino, California
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Great Room with steel-clad fireplace, concrete floors and wood beams
The listening area features a sound system by Chuck Knowledge that was tuned to every space and material in the home. A one of a kind collaboration between Chuck, the owners, and construction team delivers phenomenal sounds that includes made to order woofers built into the custom sectional sofa by Kroll.  Absorbant panels by Owens Corning on the ceiling assist in the tuning as well as preventing sound transmission to and from the rest of the home. 12 foot high Fleetwood doors open to the deck, spa, and conversation pit spaces.
The most dramatic engineering challenge came to the cantilevered corner for an unobstructed view on the northeast corner of the space. The posts hold 3 stories and a roof above, and are made of 6" diameter tube steel. This allows the Fleetwood doors to close to a corner and provides clean views of Downtown San Francisco and the East Bay Hills.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.

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