55 Living Room Concrete Floors Ceiling Lighting Lamps Design Photos And Ideas

An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
The rumpus room on the lowest level opens out to the pool deck and features a Boyd floor lamp from Australian brand Jardan, and a Nebula Nine sofa by Diesel Creative Team for Moroso.
The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.
The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The basement living room is smaller and more private, offering a dark space for watching movies as a family. Like the first-floor living room, the television is concealed by a timber screen. The artwork is by Columbian-born, Melbourne-based painter Julian Clavijo.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The living room sits at the rear of the house, connected to the garden. "Even though it's a very small house, we wanted the living room to be very generous," says the couple. "This room is the life of the house."
The library/study space opens to the sunken courtyard on one side, and offers views through the living room to the water on the other side. “This transparency within the dwelling’s core provides an interconnectivity between these contrasting edges, allowing the clients to experience an ever-changing quality of lights and atmosphere,” says architect Fraser Mudge.
Timber has been used for both internal and external cladding, joinery, furniture, and door handles throughout the home. The entry nook features built-in display storage with brass detailing, which is echoed in the kitchen counter.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
The den offers a second living area and features a sofa from Cassina and a classic Womb chair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. The artwork is by local photographer Ashley Garmon.
The living room has a glazed corner and a window that looks into the entrance courtyard. The Shaya table lamps are by Canadian brand Neuvo.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
The glazed wall separating the apartment from the street was required, since the code otherwise requires the street front to be occupied by businesses.
The rear facade has been divided into two, with a fully glazed wall that floods the living space with natural light.
A semi-private sitting room in the entrance block offers a cozier space to relax in compared to the expansive main living room.
A large, open living room seamlessly flows from the kitchen.
Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
The impressive living room has polished concrete floors which are contrasted with a white ash plywood ceiling.
In the living room, a large built-in sectional with integrated storage frees up floor space and can accommodate more people than freestanding furniture, which would chop up the interior.
The exterior materials are carried inside to a slatted entryway that conceals a utility unit and closet.
The family room across from the open bedroom features a Nelson Bubble Globe pendant, IKEA Alseda floor stools, and an heirloom tapestry wall hanging.
On the home’s lower level, an open bedroom area includes a Sierra chair by Croft House and a Nelson Bubble Cigar pendant by George Nelson for Herman Miller.
A multi-use podium runs the length of the wall under the windows and facilitates impromptu performances for the creative family that lives here.
The former gallery was enclosed in order to create space for two guest bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs. An elevated walkway stretches over the former nave and leads to a master suite opposite, separated from the other bedrooms for privacy.
Originally built in 1949 by Richard Neutra, Alexander Ban, and Josef Van Der Kar, the Millard Kaufman Residence is located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
The living room fully opens and extends to the terrace, allowing for indoor/outdoor living.
The brick used in construction of the social structure were taken from a deconstructed factory once belonging to the homeowners.
The interior of the social side of the home was made to feel like a communal pavilion, with all of the activities grouped in one fluid space and clerestory windows invoking an open-air aspect.
cozy by the fire
Inside, the angled sweep of the roofline and clerestory windows let in lots of desert light.
Perched on a small hilltop, the Sondern-Adler House exhibits the tenets of Usonian design.
Located in Portola Valley, California, this renovation of a William Wurster Ranch house began with a study of the home’s history. Inspired by original photos of the 1950s home, the renovation refreshed its significant architectural past without detracting from its Wurster essence.
The Living room
Interior view East
Room 1, located on the 2nd floor,  blends industrial detailing with exposed brick walls, polished concrete floors, rich textile finishes, and a custom walnut bed.
Low-impact materials were also used for the interior design, which is comprised primarily of concrete, glass, stone, wood, and steel. A palette of mostly light and neutral shades puts the attention on the views.
The Rod XL sofa by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani joins custom nesting tables, also designed by Di Stefano and Bongiorni and fabricated by Motta, in the refreshed living room.
The living area at one of the apartments
When entering the house, one could easily perceive its fluidity at the first glance.
The ceiling is a composite of several curved surfaces, the seams of which implicitly implying the activities underneath.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.