91 Living Room Concrete Floors Ceiling Lighting Rug Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Designer Ralph Germann inserted a partially glazed box into a 19th-century barn to form the main living space of Christine Bonvin’s home in Switzerland. Soft light enters through original arrow-loop windows.
The living space features glazed walls that look out over the garage and through the warehouse-style space toward the library. The couple’s collection of objets d’art are displayed on built-in shelves throughout the home, such as this one that wraps around a fireplace.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The family is very creative—the artwork throughout the home was created by the client’s children, and his wife is a designer who selected and placed all the interior furnishings. The interior walls were left white to act as a gallery for the owners’ extensive art collection. In order to give the spaces warmth and coziness, the ceiling was clad in Atlantic white cedar from reSAWN Timber Co.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.
The living room features a sofa by Medley Home, a rug by Dash & Albert from Annie Selke, Akari Paper Lanterns by Noguchi, and an Aluminum Group Management chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller.
Custom pendants by GRT hang from above in the open kitchen and work area.
The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The basement living room is smaller and more private, offering a dark space for watching movies as a family. Like the first-floor living room, the television is concealed by a timber screen. The artwork is by Columbian-born, Melbourne-based painter Julian Clavijo.
The sitting room on the ground floor features a Mangas Space Plait modular sofa by Patricia Urquiola for Spanish brand Gan, from Hub Furniture in Melbourne. “The materials had to essentially take a back seat to the view and the internal soft furnishings, which is where all the vibrancy and color would come from, along with the occupants and what they would bring to the table,” says architect Tony Vella. “A clear undertaking from our client was to avoid painted, rendered, tiled, or applied finishes at all costs—which was not an easy task!”
A sliding timber door elegantly conceals both the television and storage in the first-floor living room.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The artwork in the first-floor living room is by contemporary figurative artist Kathrin Longhurst. Colorful pieces, such as the artwork and furniture, bring a sense of vibrancy into the otherwise minimal home.
The living room on the first floor is the main family gathering space. “It is the collection zone for togetherness, and offers an abundance of natural light and extended views out to the bay and beyond,” says architect Tony Vella.
“There is something inherently playful about sitting on a deep window ledge with a book,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “Throughout the home, the juxtaposition of public versus private spaces and exposure versus protection is explored in different ways. In the lounge retreat, the large corner window abuts the hidden front entry door, and the stepped-down room means this bench seat is at the same level as the front entry decking. The external wall cladding wraps into the room, blurring the line between the inside and the outside and creating a delightful nook that is almost in the garden. It also provides an opportunity for engagement with neighbors and passers-by—a connection, a wave, a glimpse.”
Poughkeepsie’s joys include Walkway Over the Hudson, the world’s longest elevated pedestrian bridge connecting the city to Highland on the west bank, as well as a booming craft-beer scene. This contemporary cottage is just the place to settle in to revel in it all. Scandinavian design simplicity juxtaposes more homey touches like plants and a wall shelf filled with colorful games and books. Roomy tables, found both indoors and out, invite plenty of farm-fresh meals upon returning from Wappinger Creek and a stroll through the landscaped gardens.
The library/study space opens to the sunken courtyard on one side, and offers views through the living room to the water on the other side. “This transparency within the dwelling’s core provides an interconnectivity between these contrasting edges, allowing the clients to experience an ever-changing quality of lights and atmosphere,” says architect Fraser Mudge.
A Cheminees Philippe fireplace adds a rustic touch to the living space.
A three-seater Ella sofa and footrest in Vega Anthracit by Sofacompany anchor the living room. The steel coffee table is by Lim and the rug is from Coral & Hive. The shelving and cabinets are custom from Holz Cabinetry. The lamp is from Vamp and the lampshade is from Skinny laMinx. The chairs are from Chair Crazy and the television is from Samsung.
The event center is illuminated by large skylights overhead. The space opens to an outdoor deck. The design is a mix of store-bought and vintage with kilim rugs and woven baskets hung as wall art "to add a cozy factor and texture to the concrete and wood space," says Morgan.
Jimmy Brower and Damien Merino are a creative couple with an entrepreneurial mindset—and they created a sun-soaked sanctuary on the Oakland/Emeryville border that’s characterized by lush plant life, quiet nooks, and handmade art and decor.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
A Metro modular sofa from Room & Board offers a comfy place to perch. A Hase Collection Tula 8191 wood stove by HearthStone strikes a balance between refined and rustic.
What was once a poorly planned floor plan has transformed into open, brightly lit living spaces at the hub of the home.
Linda Hutchins and John Montague hired Works Partnership Architecture to turn a former Portland, Oregon, warehouse and auto repair shop into a versatile live/work space.
The main entrance of the house leads into the open living space, which hosts the living room, dining area, and kitchen.
Encircled by expansive windows, the living area embraces crisp breezes and warm natural light.
The home's main living space consists of a classic open floor plan, with beautiful exposed-beam ceilings.
Originally built in 1949 by Richard Neutra, Alexander Ban, and Josef Van Der Kar, the Millard Kaufman Residence is located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
Blue, yellow, and pink accents enliven the living area, where guests relax on the *Gus Modern sectional sofa.
As with most Usonian homes, the living room features high ceilings. The living room also opens to an outdoor terrace.
All of the lights are equipped with dimming mechanisms, and they emit a honey-hued glow to create a sense of warmth.
The corner of the living area is wrapped in glass.
The curved Jardan Valley sofa in green brings geometric interest to the living room.
The living room fully opens and extends to the terrace, allowing for indoor/outdoor living.
The open-plan living space is bright, white, and airy.
In addition to a wet bar and laundry room, the downstairs has a large, open space—once known as the children's living room—with a wood-burning fireplace and direct access to the grounds and pool.
White walls and concrete floors are accented by greenery and lush lounge settings.
Another cozy reading nook takes advantage of natural light.
A full-height wall of glass brings additional natural light into the open-plan living area. The step down creates a cozy divide in the space.
A wood-burning fireplace and custom wood built-ins adorn the ground-floor living space. Large openings on both sides make the interior space feel like it is part of the outdoors.
Large openings and minimal interiors make the tropical garden and pool area a focal point. The home offers outdoor living at its finest.
Perched on a small hilltop, the Sondern-Adler House exhibits the tenets of Usonian design.
A few steps lead up to the dining room area.
The elegant space is anchored by a brick, wood-burning fireplace.
The floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the stone terrace and provide a strong connection with the outdoors.
Clerestory windows line the top edge of the room.
In the family room, "short ribbon windows were replaced with a wall of glass" for indoor/outdoor flow.
By removing walls, inserting new windows, and utilizing a lighter color palette, this historic home has been treated to a modern new look.
Retractable walls allow the interior to fluidly merge with its natural surroundings. Per the architects: "While trying to always maintain the relationship between built and wild, the indoors opens completely to allow the breeze and the red sunset light to inundate the space."
The elegant, modernist-inspired living space boasts vintage Barcelona chairs and a Cassina sectional. The French doors lead out to the courtyard.
A three-dimensional bronze work of art by Denver–based Yoshitomo Saito hangs above the fireplace. From afar, it appears to be inspired by the surrounding bird sanctuary; however, up close, it resembles leaves. The wood-paneled ceiling and the wood columns are both original features.
The influence of the beach is echoed in the living room's sandy, stucco masonry. A wall of windows brings a sense of the outside in.
The lower level features a bonus family room with a wall of built-in media cabinetry.
Located in Portola Valley, California, this renovation of a William Wurster Ranch house began with a study of the home’s history. Inspired by original photos of the 1950s home, the renovation refreshed its significant architectural past without detracting from its Wurster essence.
Extensive glazing and a strong wood-burning fireplace define the living room.
Simple wood and brick contrast the industrial character of the concrete and steel, while also serving as sound dampeners.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.