26 Living Room Concrete Floors Ceiling Lighting Wall Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

A bespoke joinery unit separates the living and kitchen/dining areas, creating two distinct spaces that offer increased privacy when a number of people are using the home.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The main living area is open and fluid. The polished concrete floors have radiant heating.
The living space has two expansive glass openings, which were placed to intentionally frame exterior views.
The cabins are holdovers from when the site used to be a KOA; Geremia Design renewed the interiors.
Rockwell Group designed a flexible second-floor lobby with a co-working space and meeting rooms with transformable furniture, allowing them to double as lounges. “In a typical hotel, you can’t use a meeting room or other daytime spaces at night, and nightclubs sit empty during the day,” says Mitchell Hochberg, president of Lightstone Group. “We don’t have the option of doing that here.” Images of classical sculptures, warped by digital glitches, are in keeping with the tongue-in-cheek mood; miniature sculptures on the shelves cheekily take selfies or don leopard-print Speedos.
Originally built in 1949 by Richard Neutra, Alexander Ban, and Josef Van Der Kar, the Millard Kaufman Residence is located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
All of the lights are equipped with dimming mechanisms, and they emit a honey-hued glow to create a sense of warmth.
The brick used in construction of the social structure were taken from a deconstructed factory once belonging to the homeowners.
The interior of the social side of the home was made to feel like a communal pavilion, with all of the activities grouped in one fluid space and clerestory windows invoking an open-air aspect.
Interior House
Radiant floor heating, a high-efficiency boiler, a heat recovery ventilator, and a convection wood stove work to conserve energy.
The floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the stone terrace and provide a strong connection with the outdoors.
Clerestory windows line the top edge of the room.
In the family room, "short ribbon windows were replaced with a wall of glass" for indoor/outdoor flow.
Living Room, Sofa designed by the Architects
The dining, kitchen, and living areas flow along one long gallery-like wing of the main house, creating an easy space to entertain in.
In the main house, large windows allow the forest to enter the living space, an effect opposite from its exterior presence.
The couple often use the terrace for enjoying an espresso or aperitivo. Parentesi lights by Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzù for Flos hang next to one of the two entrances to the balcony.
The living area at one of the apartments
When entering the house, one could easily perceive its fluidity at the first glance.
The ceiling is a composite of several curved surfaces, the seams of which implicitly implying the activities underneath.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.