394 Living Room Concrete Floors Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

“We wanted to tie the living room together with a freestanding midcentury-style fireplace, which was a design collaboration between our team and Malm Fireplaces” says designer Taylor Bode. “When all of the bi-fold doors are open, you can sit in a circle around the fireplace both indoors and outdoors. It’s an integral part of the design that brings warmth and light to the corner of the house.”
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The living room has a long, built-in couch with a custom midcentury-inspired fireplace. Polished concrete floors in the interior contrast with the outdoor timber decking.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
The den offers a second living area and features a sofa from Cassina and a classic Womb chair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. The artwork is by local photographer Ashley Garmon.
The living room has a glazed corner and a window that looks into the entrance courtyard. The Shaya table lamps are by Canadian brand Neuvo.
The home has large warehouse windows that flood the space with light, ideal for their array of plants and also providing an airy palette for their art collection. On either side of a Samsung Frame TV are Riso prints by Jeffrey Cheung. Just below is an assortment of ceramics including a piece by Tyler’s sister. A Case Study Modernica Planter adds a touch of greenery.
The outer courts are used for bedrooms and studies. Each has its own view of the garden.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
The glazed wall separating the apartment from the street was required, since the code otherwise requires the street front to be occupied by businesses.
In contrast to the building’s gray concrete exterior, the residence interiors feature bright pops of color from pastel blues to vibrant yellows.
An imposing, matte black fireplace is the focal point of the living room. Wood is stored within the structure, which frees up floor space for abundant guest seating.
The common areas are furnished with cozy, lived-in furniture.
The Oostwouders wanted a home that was low-maintenance yet sophisticated. The interior is filled with materials that match the contemporary Hill Country aesthetic of the exterior.
"Lighting was orchestrated to move with the time of day, so that as the sun sets, the outside would be felt," says Peace.
Anodized aluminum-and-glass sliding doors are all that separate guests from the peaceful environs.
The artwork on the outdoor deck is by Cape Town sculptor and blacksmith Conrad Hicks. The artist also made the front entrance gates.
A look at the open living area of the prefab house in Canelones, Uruguay, designed by MAPA. The roof is made of precast concrete slabs more commonly used to build bridges.
Minimalist yet cozy, this cluster-style home in a Norwegian forest offers plenty of nooks to get comfortable in.
The stone fireplace and concrete floors add to the earthy feel of the home. The living room features a sectional by Focus One Home.
The mirrored "vault" not only reflects natural light into the interior, but also conceals an air conditioning unit, which needed a ventilated space to properly work. The lower part of the vault can be opened like a trapdoor for access.
Natural light floods the studio through a large window and is reflected into the mezzanine level via the mirrored "vault."
A porthole from the kitchen to the entrance—which makes reference to the seaside location—allows guests to be seen and welcomed as they arrive.
The 2,000-square-foot events pavilion includes bathrooms, lounges, and a catering kitchen for food prep.
The rear facade has been divided into two, with a fully glazed wall that floods the living space with natural light.
The mezzanine above the laundry will eventually be used as a study. The orange joinery beneath it functions as part of the entertainment unit and as storage for wine glasses.
Functional spaces—such as bathrooms—are contained in smaller blocks within the main spaces of the home.
The regularly spaced structural columns impose order on the irregular footprint and, along with the trees on site, helped to define the floor plan.
The open-plan living and dining room look out to the forest and pool through operative glass panels. The kitchen is partially concealed behind cabinetry at the far end of this space.
A semi-private sitting room in the entrance block offers a cozier space to relax in compared to the expansive main living room.
BoConcept couches anchor a Restoration Hardware coffee table and a Crate and Barrel carpet in the living area. The gray pouf is by CB2, and the artwork is by Senechal.
The skylight measures 18 feet by nine feet, and was divided into seven panels. "Their objective was to see the sky everywhere," Maydan adds.
The house’s small size and compact footprint necessitated some clever spatial arrangements—like the hidden kitchen—to make the space feel bigger.
The home’s interior is minimal and streamlined, with classic modern furnishings and polished concrete floors.
A large, open living room seamlessly flows from the kitchen.
Jimmy Brower and Damien Merino are a creative couple with an entrepreneurial mindset—and they created a sun-soaked sanctuary on the Oakland/Emeryville border that’s characterized by lush plant life, quiet nooks, and handmade art and decor.
Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
The living room and kitchen.
The apartment is accessed via an old freight elevator. The cabinetry around the elevator entrance—including a massive bookshelf and storage space—is black, contrasting with the white brick walls and the white oak joinery.
The structural slab on the ground floor has simply been polished as a cost effective, practical, and durable flooring solution, especially to the sand and salt.
The house uses natural cross-ventilation across both levels and vertically through the void. Banks of glass louvres throughout enable this cross ventilation and provide a constant connection with the environment.
The living room features a Cheminee Philippe wood-burning fireplace, which has a large heating capacity. By placing it below the void, it is able to heat both the downstairs and common areas upstairs.
A bespoke timber joinery unit serves as a semi-partition between the kitchen and the living space, giving a sense of separation without disconnection. Dramatic patterns of light and shadow from the sculptural skylight play over the space.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
A bespoke timber joinery unit separates the bedroom from the living space. It has been designed so that it can be easily reconfigured if the need arises for another bedroom in part of the living space.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
The den sits on the far end of the living area, and it has the only TV in the house—a family rule so that they spend time together. The space can also be a guest room for relatives visiting from Brazil. There are two bedrooms and a master suite on the second level.
When glass dominates a home, the result is a borderless residence that syncs with its environs, creating a stunning, new visual and psychological sense of space. See how these glass homes use the versatile material to create ambiance and connect with the outdoors.
Drawing light into the interior was the main priority. Large north-facing openings and skylights ensure natural light is in abundance.
The angled joinery reflects light down the hallway and offers functional storage. It also naturally directs people from the living area toward the kitchen.
Each room in the home has views to one of two courtyards or the roof garden. A window seat in the living room embraces the transition between interior and exterior.
The carpeting was removed to reveal the concrete slab underneath, which was finished with epoxy paint. “That room just beckoned to be an entertainer’s paradise,” says Wei.
Wei covered the bar in plywood cut in diagonal strips, alternating four different stains to create color variation. The coffered ceiling received Azurite in Beige/Gold from the Albany Misuto Wallpaper Collection.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.