77 Living Room Concrete Floors Ceiling Lighting Bench Design Photos And Ideas

A low-slung, built-in bench runs along the expanse of glass in the sauna building, offering visitors a place to sit and ponder nature.
Interior designer Heidi Lachapelle chose unfussy furnishings with clean lines. “Nothing should feel decorative or unnecessary,” she says. “We looked for things that would age beautifully to speak to the wabi-sabi concept.” The oak daybed is by Bautier, the indoor/outdoor rug is by Dash & Albert, and the trapezoidal cushions on the concrete bench nod to similar ones that the wife saw at Georgia O’Keefe’s home and studio. The Scandinavian-inspired fireplace throws heat from two sides.
“There is something inherently playful about sitting on a deep window ledge with a book,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “Throughout the home, the juxtaposition of public versus private spaces and exposure versus protection is explored in different ways. In the lounge retreat, the large corner window abuts the hidden front entry door, and the stepped-down room means this bench seat is at the same level as the front entry decking. The external wall cladding wraps into the room, blurring the line between the inside and the outside and creating a delightful nook that is almost in the garden. It also provides an opportunity for engagement with neighbors and passers-by—a connection, a wave, a glimpse.”
The living, kitchen, and outdoor porch areas in the primary residence are situated to enjoy sunset. The living room opens directly to the screened outdoor dining porch and a timber deck that overlooks the surrounding hills.
Poughkeepsie’s joys include Walkway Over the Hudson, the world’s longest elevated pedestrian bridge connecting the city to Highland on the west bank, as well as a booming craft-beer scene. This contemporary cottage is just the place to settle in to revel in it all. Scandinavian design simplicity juxtaposes more homey touches like plants and a wall shelf filled with colorful games and books. Roomy tables, found both indoors and out, invite plenty of farm-fresh meals upon returning from Wappinger Creek and a stroll through the landscaped gardens.
The living space steps up from the kitchen-and-dining area and features a plywood floor, ceiling and walls.
Inside, workaday concrete floors contrast with the home's clean lines and soft touches.
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The living room has a long, built-in couch with a custom midcentury-inspired fireplace. Polished concrete floors in the interior contrast with the outdoor timber decking.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
Minimalist yet cozy, this cluster-style home in a Norwegian forest offers plenty of nooks to get comfortable in.
The 2,000-square-foot events pavilion includes bathrooms, lounges, and a catering kitchen for food prep.
The mezzanine above the laundry will eventually be used as a study. The orange joinery beneath it functions as part of the entertainment unit and as storage for wine glasses.
Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
The angled joinery reflects light down the hallway and offers functional storage. It also naturally directs people from the living area toward the kitchen.
Each room in the home has views to one of two courtyards or the roof garden. A window seat in the living room embraces the transition between interior and exterior.
A cushioned window seat with storage beneath it runs the entire length of the living room.
In defiance of its oversized neighbors, this sustainable 753-square-foot home in Perth, by architecture firm Whispering Smith, maximizes its small footprint through built-in furniture and textures of concrete, reclaimed brick, tile, and white metal. Devoid of walls and doors, the streamlined spaces flow into one another, and connect to the ample rear courtyard.
Glass walls give the feeling of being outdoors while relaxing inside the house.
“Instead of using a typical frame system, we created frameless windows by burying aluminum channels into the floors and walls,” says Richard. “It kept our glazing budget much lower than normal.” The sofas feature custom upholstery by Inverse Project and HDM.
In the living room, a large built-in sectional with integrated storage frees up floor space and can accommodate more people than freestanding furniture, which would chop up the interior.
“The podium, which brings you on eye-level with the monumental arched windows, functions both as a lounge place, a stage, a huge cupboard, and a very long working desk,” says Eklund and ter Beek.
A multi-use podium runs the length of the wall under the windows and facilitates impromptu performances for the creative family that lives here.
"The wood structure has a depth that creates a play of shadows through the day and a calm atmosphere resembling the feeling of sitting under a tree," says the firm.
Short staircases lead to sequestered nooks made for contemplation and getting work done. "The concrete floors and stairs dissolve the division of inside and outside," says Atelier Oslo. "The interior becomes part of the landscape, and walking in and around the cabin gives a unique experience, where the different qualities from the site become part of the architecture."
The vaulted ceiling gives the living room a sense of drama and spaciousness. The built-in redwood couch runs the length of the room.
Built in 1953 for Samuel and Dorothy Eppstein, the ranch-style home is an exemplary representation of Prairie School-style architecture and Usonian thinking. Constructed by the original homeowners, the midcentury residence displays a history of care and thoughtfulness in every detail. The home has been completely renovated and furnished, staying true to the original era of the home and preserving the handiwork, craft, and brilliance of the original. The massive undertaking was led by husband-and-wife team Tony Hillebrandt and Marika Broere after careful research and conversations with previous residents. The result is a beautiful restoration which respects the history of the home.
Encircled by expansive windows, the living area embraces crisp breezes and warm natural light.
The home's main living space consists of a classic open floor plan, with beautiful exposed-beam ceilings.
The corner of the living area is wrapped in glass.
Other custom Wright furnishings designed for the home and built for the first time include the upholstered ottomans and two coffee tables.
The team cleaned and restored all of the interior brickwork and replaced faulty insulated glass.
The living room fully opens and extends to the terrace, allowing for indoor/outdoor living.
This space was originally outfitted by acclaimed Parisian industrial designer Raymond Loewy, the mind behind the 1955 Coca-Cola contour bottle, the 1959 TWA twin globes logo, the 1963 Studebaker Avanti, and the 1962 Air Force One livery.
Another cozy reading nook takes advantage of natural light.
cozy by the fire
Living and dining spaces wrap around the full-height fireplace.  Original light fixtures remain and have been outfitted with LED lights.
Interior House
A full-height wall of glass brings additional natural light into the open-plan living area. The step down creates a cozy divide in the space.
A few steps lead up to the dining room area.
The elegant space is anchored by a brick, wood-burning fireplace.
Living Room and Kitchen
Living Room, Sofa designed by the Architects
From the apartment entrance
Ample storage is provided in the kitchen area and the steps leading up to the bed.
The two yellow hanging pendants contrast with the light green and hint at the punches of yellow also found in the bathroom.
Sunlight enters the apartment from the east and west.
Located in Portola Valley, California, this renovation of a William Wurster Ranch house began with a study of the home’s history. Inspired by original photos of the 1950s home, the renovation refreshed its significant architectural past without detracting from its Wurster essence.
Rich, barn-like wooden beams punctuate the sleek, airy interiors, adding texture and character. Pops of color from the bright pink sofas, combined with the hand-knotted rugs, add a sense of luxury to the polished concrete floors.
LIVING ROOM
Interior looking into back space
Living Room
The residence was designed by Baltimore-based architecture firm Ziger/Snead and built by Blackhorse Construction. Its living room features chairs by A. Rudin and a daybed and sofa by Bright Chair.
The living room.
Living Room

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.