47 Living Room Concrete Floors Ceiling Lighting Storage Design Photos And Ideas

Designer Ralph Germann inserted a partially glazed box into a 19th-century barn to form the main living space of Christine Bonvin’s home in Switzerland. Soft light enters through original arrow-loop windows.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
This innovative residential addition by Best Practice Architecture was built to give an aging family member a safe, well-designed, and private dwelling. In addition to meeting the immediate needs of the family, the space also needed to accommodate future use as a rental unit, studio, or office. Converting an existing garage was the perfect solution. Carefully placed windows and skylights provide lots of daylight, while exposed rafters create a loft-like atmosphere. A short walk through the entryway reveals the bedroom, bathroom, and laundry room. A lofted space above the bathroom can be used as storage, an office, or sleeping quarters. It also opens to a private back deck. All of these details come together to create an inviting, open-concept accommodation, making the relatively small footprint of this granny pad feel much larger than it really is.
Inside, workaday concrete floors contrast with the home's clean lines and soft touches.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
The mezzanine above the laundry will eventually be used as a study. The orange joinery beneath it functions as part of the entertainment unit and as storage for wine glasses.
The structural slab on the ground floor has simply been polished as a cost effective, practical, and durable flooring solution, especially to the sand and salt.
A bespoke timber joinery unit serves as a semi-partition between the kitchen and the living space, giving a sense of separation without disconnection. Dramatic patterns of light and shadow from the sculptural skylight play over the space.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
The angled joinery reflects light down the hallway and offers functional storage. It also naturally directs people from the living area toward the kitchen.
The carpeting was removed to reveal the concrete slab underneath, which was finished with epoxy paint. “That room just beckoned to be an entertainer’s paradise,” says Wei.
A cushioned window seat with storage beneath it runs the entire length of the living room.
In the living room, a large built-in sectional with integrated storage frees up floor space and can accommodate more people than freestanding furniture, which would chop up the interior.
The exterior materials are carried inside to a slatted entryway that conceals a utility unit and closet.
“The podium, which brings you on eye-level with the monumental arched windows, functions both as a lounge place, a stage, a huge cupboard, and a very long working desk,” says Eklund and ter Beek.
A multi-use podium runs the length of the wall under the windows and facilitates impromptu performances for the creative family that lives here.
Short staircases lead to sequestered nooks made for contemplation and getting work done. "The concrete floors and stairs dissolve the division of inside and outside," says Atelier Oslo. "The interior becomes part of the landscape, and walking in and around the cabin gives a unique experience, where the different qualities from the site become part of the architecture."
The former gallery was enclosed in order to create space for two guest bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs. An elevated walkway stretches over the former nave and leads to a master suite opposite, separated from the other bedrooms for privacy.
“Sharing roots with local Michiana pole barns, this economical structure of glue-laminated Douglas fir bents, braces, and decking is held above runoff and snow by galvanized steel stirrups,” says Wheeler Kearns Architects. The boat-like, wooden ceiling in Bohan Kemp is a truly unique feature, directing air flow and adding charm to the space.
Even the living area opens to the outdoors.
Inside, the angled sweep of the roofline and clerestory windows let in lots of desert light.
Radiant floor heating, a high-efficiency boiler, a heat recovery ventilator, and a convection wood stove work to conserve energy.
Large windows provide natural light while showcasing the spectacular landscape that surrounds the property.
The floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the stone terrace and provide a strong connection with the outdoors.
Clerestory windows line the top edge of the room.
Retractable walls allow the interior to fluidly merge with its natural surroundings. Per the architects: "While trying to always maintain the relationship between built and wild, the indoors opens completely to allow the breeze and the red sunset light to inundate the space."
The cedar-clad interior provides protection from the sun and orients views towards the ocean.
Ample storage is provided in the kitchen area and the steps leading up to the bed.
The two yellow hanging pendants contrast with the light green and hint at the punches of yellow also found in the bathroom.
The living lounge opens to a small balcony.
The lower level also features has a board-formed concrete fireplace.
The Living room
A cozy corner of the living room has access to a south-facing outdoor area where the family enjoys dinner on warm summer days.
The Rod XL sofa by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani joins custom nesting tables, also designed by Di Stefano and Bongiorni and fabricated by Motta, in the refreshed living room.
Combining a prefab steel super-structure with concrete walls and insulated metal panels, Anthrazit House in Santa Barbara was designed by architects Pamela and Hector Magnus and built in collaboration with EcoSteel.“This wasn’t a traditional Santa Barbara site with large acreage,” Hector says. “It was small and steep.” Expansive windows on the second floor face a park.
The coffee table, red Memorex video ball TV, and red Mercer candlestick phone are all thrift store finds. The ceiling fan from Modern Fan Company is contemporary, but matches the retro aesthetic.
The living area at one of the apartments

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.