1907 Kitchen Wood Cabinets Design Photos And Ideas

In the kitchen, a bank of copper-fronted cabinetry joins the pink marble backsplash. The island is set atop a curving pink base that gives it some lightness.
A picture window and wooden windowsill are among the considerate touches in the galley kitchen.
The view back into the kitchen frames the inset wood shelves, and allows one component of the work triangle, the stove, to stay tucked out of sight.
The space's neutral palette was intentional, since Amy thought that it would naturally connect with the outdoors. "By keeping things neutral, our space always feels peaceful," he says.
Amy worked with Josh Tomlinson of Tomlinson Woodworks to craft the island, which is as much of a showpiece as it is for storage. He also did the cabinetry.
Dyer inserted new wood inlay in the kitchen floors.
Custom cabinetry was added to meet Hixton's kitchen needs. "We measured all her jars, the plates, everything," says Dyer. The color palette was largely guided by a client-provided velvet pillow and Jackson's signature red-glazed pottery.
Jackson is a potter and he is responsible for the bespoke backsplash tiles. Dyer worked closely with him on the module and layout, and coordinating to get the tiles to match their perfect shade of green: Sherwin-Williams' 'Rosemary'.
This space at the end is where the kitchen nook had been.
The renovation made only minor changes to the kitchen's original footprint changes were minimal. However, the entire ceiling was vaulted and skylights were added for additional natural light. "This was a reaction to the neighbors building an ADU right up to their property line,
Tembo stools by Note Designs Studio add cheer to the serene kitchen.
The stove was kept in place in order to retain the position of the gas and venting. The designer dropped the sill on the right-side window to the floor. Sleek black cabinetry is topped with Essastone Concrete Pezzato weathered stone on the perimeter, and custom terrazzo on the island.
“We don’t need the full ‘breakfast bar’ that is a feature of so many modern kitchens, as we make a point of eating together as a family at the table for meals,” say the clients. “The stools under the cantilevered bench are usually used while chopping vegetables with a glass of wine in hand.”
Bright red laminate shelves hold the family’s coffee supplies in a delightful reveal.
A wall of custom blackbutt cabinetry conceals the fridge and lots of storage.
Extending the open shelves across the window in the kitchen maximized the area for storage, creating a visually appealing way to display the couple's collection of ceramic tableware.
West stands near the kitchen's Dutch door, which opens to the porch.
Whitney created a bright and airy feeling for the kitchen by switching out the stainless-steel appliances for bright white ones. Sunlight pours in from the skylight and reflects off of the glossy finish of the cream-colored counters that replaced the original black speckled countertops. "I was craving bright countertops, but I also wanted something with a slight, sandy texture as an homage to the nearby beach," says Whitney. "I also liked the idea of a mildly reflective surface to help enhance the light that spills in from the skylight over the dining counter."
"The kitchen, dining room, and other public areas are awash in daylight," says the design firm. "Those public areas are made open, and help to facilitate physical and spiritual interaction among family members."
“One night when we sat and had a dinner, I said I would design this neon for his kitchen because it would be perfect,” Schwalgien says, “and then he agreed to it.”
Interior Designer Stephanie Dyer in the completed project.
Dyer Studio custom-designed the island with a black-stained white oak wood base and a walnut and soapstone counter that curves at both ends.
Dyer was inspired by all of the original curved details throughout the home, and wove subtle references into the kitchen’s design, including the scalloped detail in the stone counter and backsplash, the curving walls of the stove alcove, and at the coved ceilings.
Removing the dropped ceilings had a dramatic effect on the perceived size of the room. “I think the ceiling height alone changed how that space felt,” says Dyer.
The team added a bank of windows above the sink to flood the room with light. The ceiling pendants are from Allied Maker and the stool is the Cherner Counter Stool from Design Within Reach.
The color of the BlueStar range references the dining room.
Per the clients’ request, the kitchen skews to a predominantly white color palette, with the bespoke island providing contrast.
“For the ceiling dome above the cooking area, the exaggerated style and pattern add whimsy to the space and conceal the required equipment and piping,” explains the firm.
A tiled niche sports cutting boards from the local Steelwood Design.
An integrated bench with a slat wall makes for a natural seat at the top of the stairs.
Now, the kitchen is seamlessly integrated into the floor plan and with the exterior via the large sliding doors. "It's really at the center of the pinwheel of circulation," says Cuddington. Construction-grade fir plywood cabinetry with cut-out handles is topped with a Caesarstone counter. The stools are from Hay.
The stairs lead to the first-floor kitchen and living space. As in the rest of the home, the material palette is intentionally simple and elegant. It includes engineered timber Proparq flooring by Unico, custom joinery crafted from stained oak veneer, and a marble countertop.
All of the home’s interior walls were finished in plaster.
Kerf cabinetry, Heath Ceramics tile, and a BlueStar range complement stainless steel countertops and a porcelain sink in the kitchen.
Large sliders by LaCantina Doors bring ample light into the kitchen, which features a blackened steel pendant by the architects and De Haro counter stools by Fyrn. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">Concreteworks countertops, a Wolf range, Kallista sink, and Boffi faucet also fill the space.</span>
Dumas kept a relatively simple palette when it came to the interior. Floor-to-ceiling cabinetry in the kitchen acts as an effective noise barrier.
The new kitchen/dining room is entirely open and provides views of the garden.
The newly squared-off bay window now has a built-in bench. The teak cabinet pulls are custom. A Sub-Zero refrigerator is concealed behind teak panels, and a built-in coffee maker sits beside an inset counter.
The kitchen is outfitted with custom teak cabinetry and a black soapstone counter that extends up the backsplash and waterfalls to the floor. Dramatic built-in shelves accentuate the high ceilings.
Located on the ground level, the kitchen and main living space are open to the elements. Large sliding doors pocket into the wall cavity, providing a seamless connection to the coast. Skylights allow natural light to filter into the space while providing glimpses to the green roof above. A horizontal window provides a snapshot to the rugged, mountainous terrain. The linear kitchen leads along a circulation spine, which connects to the more private areas.
Previously, a small bathroom was located off the kitchen space. By relocating the bathroom elsewhere in the home, this freed up space for a large walk-in pantry where all the food and clutter could hide, and even the fridge.
Since Andrea is a food photographer with a passion for cooking, the architects made the kitchen the most important room in the house. The kitchen has direct access to the garden, where Andrea grows herbs and vegetables.
The homeowners love the flow of the kitchen, dining room, living room, and butler’s pantry—so much so that they've already had more parties since moving in than they did in 26 years at their prior residence.
The strand board floor is coated with a super-durable multilayer paint system. Its bright yellow hue ties together the new communal spaces, and it gave rise to the project’s name—The Yolk House.
The double-duty kitchen island is a simple offshoot that contrasts with the industrial countertops.
Clay Anderson of Olson Kundig and Alex Almerico of NBBJ give their 505-square-foot home in Capitol Hill a serious upgrade on a strict budget. Adding built-in plywood bookshelves to the living room side of the kitchen island was a logical way to add storage and display space. Anderson also built a coffee table to match, using a remnant piece of blackened steel from his office, building a plywood box, and adding caster wheels. The pendant lights are simple matte black metal pipes that the couple ordered off Etsy from Greece. They also chose a Brizo matte black faucet to continue the "pipe look."
Since the home is something of a pied-à-terre for the clients, its design is geared more toward short-term stays than full-time living. That means spaces like the kitchen are set up for entertaining. Notice the curve on the cabinetry, counter, and backsplash, which is Calacatta Macchia Vecchia marble. All of the appliances are from Fisher & Paykel, and the wall sconce is a Gabriel Scott single Welles pendant in smoked glass and brushed brass.
What was once a closed-off kitchen has been transformed into an efficient cooking and dining space complete with simple wood cabinets, sleek fixtures, and black accents. A mirrored backsplash reflects light, making this open space feel even larger.
What was once a small dining area has been opened up into a bright kitchen, living, and dining space.
The handmade-look white brick tiles on the kitchen backsplash echo the brickwork used on the outdoor fireplace. They help to provide visual continuity from the exterior to the interior.
The kitchen is at the heart of the home, and the layout is arranged so that the views can be appreciated when preparing a meal. Warm timber shelves and furniture contrast with the dark kitchen joinery to create a balanced interior palette.
The most recent renovation utilizes reasonably low-cost materials, such as pine, oak, and Carrara marble, to create a simple and cohesive palette.
In the kitchen, oak joinery and a minimal fireplace sit within a neutral, low-cost pine plywood wall.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
The state-of-the-art kitchen features teak cabinetry, a large island, and all-new appliances.
"Make sure everyone in your home knows where each item goes and you'll be surprised at how big of a difference it makes," Mindell says. This philosophy applies to kids, too, who Mindell says should be as autonomous as possible in the kitchen.
Wine cellar
Plywood and brass joinery
Made-in-Québec Cambrian granite graces the countertops, a good-looking yet durable choice. The large freestanding pantry cleverly incorporates the refrigerator.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.