299 Kitchen Wood Cabinets Marble Counters Design Photos And Ideas

A laundry and powder room are hidden behind artful wood paneling.
The kitchen was previously located in a dark hallway at the back of the house, but now it’s the core of the home.
Vermont Danby Marble along the countertops features blue veining that nods to the home's waterfront location. Sliding glass doors open the dining area to the surrounding outdoor space.
In the kitchen, bar stools by Atelier Arking line a marble-topped island.
The kitchen and wet bar open out into the living area. Timber joinery adds warmth to the interior and contrasts with more industrial materials, such as the steel and concrete.
Photo: Willem-Dirk du Toit
The quartzite island in the kitchen is a grounding presence beneath the void and a focal point between the dining room and living room. The living room features a Gentry sofa by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso.
The kitchen sits at the center of the home beneath the void. Beneath the stair, sliding pocket doors conceal a pantry and kitchen appliances (such as the toaster and kettle).
The stone island bench in the kitchen is a Montenegro Quartzite from Artedomus. “Its monolithic quality really grounds the space under the towering void above,” says architect Bronwyn Litera.
The architects created built-in storage to show off Frank and Amy’s extensive LEGO collection. A glimpse of the couple’s collection can be seen on the left.
Architect Eric Olsen imagined a space that employs contrasting colors, textures, and shapes to create a warm and inviting interior. One of many such details includes a custom light fixture above the island, which he designed in collaboration with Buzzell Studios.
The cabinetry in the kitchen is rift-sawn, dark-stained white oak that complements the ceilings and contrasts with the white walls. The dark-pigmented concrete floors were intentionally left untreated in order to convey a sense of time. “As the home ages, the floor ‘records’ the construction process, foot traffic, wine spilled at birthday parties, drips of olive oil from anniversary dinners, watermarks from relaxing showers, and so on,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Every action will be subtly set in stone before it’s quickly cleaned up or swept away. Over the years, a patina of life will build up, adding depth and beauty to the interior.”
The all-electric kitchen features oak cabinetry and a marble countertop.
Birch plywood with a white wash forms the cabinetry in the kitchen and the island is topped with marble. Perimeter counters are Corian. The faucet is Astra Walker and the cabinet handles are Made Measure.
The kitchen is anchored by a deep window seat with views of the harbor. “My favorite place in the house is the built-in deep daybed off the kitchen, from where I like to look out onto the water with a book in hand,” says Fox. “Having the view of the water and getting cozy in that spot is perfect.”
The light in the kitchen is Supernova by Delta. “We explored the historical idea of how traditional native dwellings had a fire at the centre of the house around which everything gathers,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “The idea of an ‘oculus’ came from this and we thought it would be fun to play off that and provide this oculus-like light that is effectively the centre point of gathering within the home.”
The large kitchen is a space for the family to gather, with a stone-look porcelain benchtop and splashback from Stone Tile. “The clients wanted the stone in the kitchen to feel natural rather than dramatic,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “It's large format porcelain, though, as I don’t think they would have been able to handle the level of patina that would have developed on a natural stone when cooking with children!”
A Kohler Whitehaven sink was used for the "main
This area is made for coffee, wine, and other beverage needs, complete with drawers for equipment. A Danby Silhouette Beverage center sets the scene.
Marble covers the backsplash, and new upper cabinets inset with fluted glass were added.
The stainless-steel elements, including the counter and cabinets, were also kept in place for their industrial character. The island was reworked and topped with marble.
The architects reused much of the existing walnut cabinetry, giving it an ebonized finish for contrast.
The spotted gum joinery in the kitchen dissolves into the sliding screen that divides the library/study from the living area. Brass details, such as the handles and the seat of the stool, add warmth to the material palette.
The kitchen counters are Pietra Gray marble, which complements the refinement of the spotted gum timber joinery.
An open shelf displays the couple’s glassware collection.
Now, the kitchen has walnut cabinetry with inset doors painted a creamy white. The counter is marble, and the backsplash is the Classic Field tile in chartreuse from Heath Ceramics. The floors are new linoleum.
A local blacksmith fabricated metal elements for the doors, shelves, and light fittings throughout the house.
The dining table and chairs in the kitchen were handcrafted by the homeowner from timber harvested on-site.
A gray marble counter adds texture and visual interest to this kitchen designed by Jesse Vickers.
Angelica Becerril prepares food at the kitchen island; the Carrara marble countertop is one of the few luxury materials used in the house.
The front and back doors are only 12 feet apart from one another, separated by the living space at the heart of the home. The open floor plan allows the living space, den, dining room, and kitchen to flow into each other, while the way the volumes are positioned makes each space feel distinct—this works well for entertaining both large and small groups.
A full-length skylight above the floating steel shelf in the kitchen allows light to stream across the Venetian plaster wall and bounce off the high-gloss white shelf. “It creates an ever-changing and ethereal experience,” says designer Jamie Chioco. The ceramic dishes and plates displayed on the shelf are from Kinn Home.
The kitchen countertops and backsplash are Carrara marble slabs, while the cabinetry is crafted from vertical-grain white oak, which adds warmth while contributing to the brightness of the interior palette.
The island bar in the kitchen features white Arcilla Field tiles by Ann Sacks that match the turquoise tiles used in the guest bathroom. The lights above the bench are classic VL45 Radiohus pendants, which were originally designed in the 1940s by Danish architect Vilhelm Lauritzen for Louis Poulsen for the construction of the Radiohuset building in Copenhagen.
The kitchen opens up to a covered courtyard, which features a fireplace that transforms the semi-outdoor space into a cozy living area year round. This courtyard connects to the covered deck, from which the bedrooms can be accessed.
Terrazzo flooring replaced the existing porcelain tile floor. "The terrazzo floor is about coming up with this lovely texture that wasn’t just polished concrete," explains Carter.
The kitchen island was handcrafted with 30-millimeter Tasmanian Oak half-round dowels. "The [curved form] became a real feature of the house which was mimicked in details such as the timber island and doorway threshold," explains Peake. The countertop is Carrara marble from Avant Stone.
"We always like to do floor-to-ceiling curtains: we feel it's softer and more intentional," says Peake. The light above the island is a Span Linear Pendant from Living Edge.
In the kitchen, a bank of copper-fronted cabinetry joins the pink marble backsplash. The island is set atop a curving pink base that gives it some lightness.
Extending the open shelves across the window in the kitchen maximized the area for storage, creating a visually appealing way to display the couple's collection of ceramic tableware.
“For me, it was very important to use materials which last and age with grace,” Schalgien says of the Verde Guatemala countertops.
“One night when we sat and had a dinner, I said I would design this neon for his kitchen because it would be perfect,” Schwalgien says, “and then he agreed to it.”
Interior Designer Stephanie Dyer in the completed project.
Dyer Studio custom-designed the island with a black-stained white oak wood base and a walnut and soapstone counter that curves at both ends.
Dyer was inspired by all of the original curved details throughout the home, and wove subtle references into the kitchen’s design, including the scalloped detail in the stone counter and backsplash, the curving walls of the stove alcove, and at the coved ceilings.
Removing the dropped ceilings had a dramatic effect on the perceived size of the room. “I think the ceiling height alone changed how that space felt,” says Dyer.
The team added a bank of windows above the sink to flood the room with light. The ceiling pendants are from Allied Maker and the stool is the Cherner Counter Stool from Design Within Reach.
The color of the BlueStar range references the dining room.
Per the clients’ request, the kitchen skews to a predominantly white color palette, with the bespoke island providing contrast.
The stairs lead to the first-floor kitchen and living space. As in the rest of the home, the material palette is intentionally simple and elegant. It includes engineered timber Proparq flooring by Unico, custom joinery crafted from stained oak veneer, and a marble countertop.
Since the home is something of a pied-à-terre for the clients, its design is geared more toward short-term stays than full-time living. That means spaces like the kitchen are set up for entertaining. Notice the curve on the cabinetry, counter, and backsplash, which is Calacatta Macchia Vecchia marble. All of the appliances are from Fisher & Paykel, and the wall sconce is a Gabriel Scott single Welles pendant in smoked glass and brushed brass.
The large barbecue anchors the quincho, a designated space to cook and host guests.
The kitchen’s marble counter was the only thing brought in from Santiago—all other materials were sourced locally.
As the home’s concept was developed, the dining and kitchen volume was configured first. "The idea is that it can work independently from the rest of the house; it has associated bathrooms and independent access," says Sánchez.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.