464 Kitchen Wood Cabinets Drop In Sinks Design Photos And Ideas

Recycled veneer coats the cabinetry, custom plant holders bring the outside in, and stainless steel provides a modern touch without seeming stark.
The Corian countertop in the kitchen and the bespoke timber kitchen cabinets and breakfast bench were the most expensive parts of the build-out.
A picture window and wooden windowsill are among the considerate touches in the galley kitchen.
Amy worked with Josh Tomlinson of Tomlinson Woodworks to craft the island, which is as much of a showpiece as it is for storage. He also did the cabinetry.
Extending the open shelves across the window in the kitchen maximized the area for storage, creating a visually appealing way to display the couple's collection of ceramic tableware.
Kerf cabinetry, Heath Ceramics tile, and a BlueStar range complement stainless steel countertops and a porcelain sink in the kitchen.
Dumas kept a relatively simple palette when it came to the interior. Floor-to-ceiling cabinetry in the kitchen acts as an effective noise barrier.
The new kitchen/dining room is entirely open and provides views of the garden.
Located on the ground level, the kitchen and main living space are open to the elements. Large sliding doors pocket into the wall cavity, providing a seamless connection to the coast. Skylights allow natural light to filter into the space while providing glimpses to the green roof above. A horizontal window provides a snapshot to the rugged, mountainous terrain. The linear kitchen leads along a circulation spine, which connects to the more private areas.
The homeowners love the flow of the kitchen, dining room, living room, and butler’s pantry—so much so that they've already had more parties since moving in than they did in 26 years at their prior residence.
The double-duty kitchen island is a simple offshoot that contrasts with the industrial countertops.
The handmade-look white brick tiles on the kitchen backsplash echo the brickwork used on the outdoor fireplace. They help to provide visual continuity from the exterior to the interior.
The kitchen is at the heart of the home, and the layout is arranged so that the views can be appreciated when preparing a meal. Warm timber shelves and furniture contrast with the dark kitchen joinery to create a balanced interior palette.
The most recent renovation utilizes reasonably low-cost materials, such as pine, oak, and Carrara marble, to create a simple and cohesive palette.
In the kitchen, oak joinery and a minimal fireplace sit within a neutral, low-cost pine plywood wall.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
"Make sure everyone in your home knows where each item goes and you'll be surprised at how big of a difference it makes," Mindell says. This philosophy applies to kids, too, who Mindell says should be as autonomous as possible in the kitchen.
Wine cellar
Cork flooring knits the main living spaces together.
Simple leather pulls adorn the cabinet faces, while open shelves put everyday items within easy reach.
A warm palette of birch plywood with olive green linoleum outfits the kitchen.
The kitchen features oak woodwork, black fixtures and fittings, and black hexagonal tiles that mimic the lines of the local landscape and represent the “basalt columns and moodiness of Iceland”.
The couple outfitted the kitchen with stainless steel counters and cabinetry and shelving made from Douglas fir sawmill offcuts.
An elongated kitchen window ties the interior to the outdoor deck and bar area and the landscape beyond.
The entry of the home leads to a fully open-plan living/dining/kitchen space with full width sliding doors that open to the garden. This part of the home was completed by the owners prior to adding the extension.
The kitchen cabinets are partly finished in Formica laminate in a royal dark blue color that contrasts with the white ceramic backsplash tiles, the oak laminate cabinets, and the Victorian ash timber floor. The countertop is crafted from Stone Ambassador Beton engineered stone, which echoes the burnished concrete floor in the meals alcove.
The dairy’s northern facade sits toward the rear the residence, where the dining room, kitchen, and casual meals area are located. An original window, now with acoustic glazing, connects the music studio located within the dairy with the casual meals area.
Custom steel shelving suspended above the kitchen island brings an industrial aesthetic to the interior that compliments the facade of the dairy, which is symbolic of an industrious era.
Custom cabinetry in the kitchen is built from white oak and topped with Caesarstone counters. The floors are engineered hardwood.
The entire interior—including bespoke joinery and furniture—is crafted from timber.
The antler chandeliers above the kitchen table are from local lighting store Milton Lighting.
A graphic black lighting feature hangs above the kitchen bench, which conceals storage space behind oak doors.
“Removing the wall afforded a larger kitchen footprint, and made the space more inviting,” Hope-Kennedy says.
Dark wood floors were used throughout the ground level to unite the kitchen, living, and dining areas.
The flooring is oversized slabs of slate from Brazil, while the millwork is all teak. The owners were big sailors and the teak is a nod to them as it's used in boat construction and decking. "It worked really well with the neutral palette," Krulle says.
The floors, cabinet face frames, upper wall panels, and the tops of the bathroom and shower are made from a recycled and re-milled factory maple and beech blend from Longleaf Lumber in Berwick, Maine. The couple kept two of the original cage doors: one at the front, and the other at the back of the bus.
This 720-square-foot apartment in Barcelona was renovated and opened up by Nook Architects. Key to the design are the original barrel-vaulted ceilings, which are mimicked in the mixed-use gallery in the front. What was once a central hallway dividing multiple rooms—typical of older apartments—became a new common space that flows into the gallery. Materials were also limited exclusively to those already present in the space—namely, wood, ceramic, and marble. A canopy of original terra-cotta tiles line the barrel-vaulted ceilings, and a minimal aesthetic ties it all together.
The kitchen countertops are black quartz, offering a strong visual contrast to the plywood. “Leïla and Xavier enjoy having friends over to sit at the kitchen island, which is the center of the space,” says architect Catherine Milanese.
The kitchen area features plywood cabinetry and counters and metal shelving.
The kitchen overlooks stunning views and features a Solna faucet by Brizo, Urbanedge sinks by Julien, a Lumen dishwasher by Miele, a Gaggenau cooktop, honed Balsatina countertops, and custom mixed-grain teak cabinetry.
The kitchen showcases seamless maple cabinetry and soapstone counters, elements that pair well to create a simple, cozy atmosphere.
In the kitchen, a picture window frames a view of the older brick structure. The original structure’s mint-green window frames inspired the new design.
The kitchen has a simple design and utilizes low-cost materials so that the client could fabricate it using a limited selection of tools.
The yellow stair is echoed by a matching yellow backsplash in the kitchen.
The kitchen retains its original plan, but it’s been updated with new counters, cabinets, appliances, and lighting. A new wood counter, sink, cantilevered shelf, and cabinets were added opposite the original kitchen counter to create a convenient space for food and drink prep.
The steps to the kitchen were designed by Netsch to the proportions of the Parthenon, necessitating half steps in between. Will and Mark regularly entertain large groups, and removable cushions provide miscellaneous seating for guests.
The original home had very few handrails along the open edges of each floor. As part of the renovation, SOM added simple handrails that would not compete with the architecture. On stairs without railings, cushions offer a gentle resistance to people standing near the edge.
Bailey integrated red and yellow accents throughout the cabin in a nod to its ’70s origins. Paprika-colored Heath tile bedecks the backsplash. The matte-black, enamel cast iron pan is by Crane Cookware.
"They wanted a very friendly, functional, and warm kitchen," Maydan says. Meital adds, "We cook a lot and have a lot of friends. We are French people!" Sub-Zero, Wolf, and Bosch appliances mix with a Restoration Hardware dining table and BoConcept chairs.
"It doesn’t feel like a garage because Ramiro cut away the boxiness, but we could still roll a car in here," says Jorge. The refrigerator is by Haier; the range is by KitchenAid.
The kitchen area is full of charm, starting with the original painted brick wall and continuing with cabinets made from reclaimed Iroko wood. The uneven application of paint mimics the aged wood.
Here, an industrial material palette—with a concrete brick backsplash and counter foundation, and zinc-plated pan-decking ceilings—complement the development’s edgy facade.
Vibrant blue cabinets brighten up this kitchen and serve as a bold contrast to the exposed brick. The stainless-steel countertop wraps slightly up the wall, and creates a trough for storing items.
Brick, paired with concrete and wood, creates an organic warmth throughout this Spanish home.
A third-floor kitchen looks out over a balcony garden and city views. Bar stools by Pick Up line the centralized island.
Artist Cori Creed stands in the kitchen of the vacation home in rural British Columbia that she and her husband, Craig Cameron, built with their friend and architect, Kevin Vallely. Cori made the ceramic dinnerware and pendants, while Craig built the kitchen island and installed the plywood ceiling with the help of his stepfather.
"The owner loves walnut and wanted something really warm and inviting that didn't feel rustic," Becky says. "She has a modern edge to her."
The renovation by architect Paul McKean opened up the kitchen to the rest of the living room, without losing the original furnace, which is part of the home’s rustic-meets-modern charm.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.