684 Kitchen Wood Cabinets Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The service corridor emphasizes axial circulation and austerity of materials, with concrete countertops and wood cabinetry.
In the kitchen, a bank of copper-fronted cabinetry joins the pink marble backsplash. The island is set atop a curving pink base that gives it some lightness.
The view back into the kitchen frames the inset wood shelves, and allows one component of the work triangle, the stove, to stay tucked out of sight.
Tembo stools by Note Designs Studio add cheer to the serene kitchen.
The stove was kept in place in order to retain the position of the gas and venting. The designer dropped the sill on the right-side window to the floor. Sleek black cabinetry is topped with Essastone Concrete Pezzato weathered stone on the perimeter, and custom terrazzo on the island.
“We don’t need the full ‘breakfast bar’ that is a feature of so many modern kitchens, as we make a point of eating together as a family at the table for meals,” say the clients. “The stools under the cantilevered bench are usually used while chopping vegetables with a glass of wine in hand.”
Bright red laminate shelves hold the family’s coffee supplies in a delightful reveal.
A wall of custom blackbutt cabinetry conceals the fridge and lots of storage.
West stands near the kitchen's Dutch door, which opens to the porch.
“One night when we sat and had a dinner, I said I would design this neon for his kitchen because it would be perfect,” Schwalgien says, “and then he agreed to it.”
Interior Designer Stephanie Dyer in the completed project.
Dyer Studio custom-designed the island with a black-stained white oak wood base and a walnut and soapstone counter that curves at both ends.
Dyer was inspired by all of the original curved details throughout the home, and wove subtle references into the kitchen’s design, including the scalloped detail in the stone counter and backsplash, the curving walls of the stove alcove, and at the coved ceilings.
Removing the dropped ceilings had a dramatic effect on the perceived size of the room. “I think the ceiling height alone changed how that space felt,” says Dyer.
The team added a bank of windows above the sink to flood the room with light. The ceiling pendants are from Allied Maker and the stool is the Cherner Counter Stool from Design Within Reach.
Per the clients’ request, the kitchen skews to a predominantly white color palette, with the bespoke island providing contrast.
“For the ceiling dome above the cooking area, the exaggerated style and pattern add whimsy to the space and conceal the required equipment and piping,” explains the firm.
Large sliders by LaCantina Doors bring ample light into the kitchen, which features a blackened steel pendant by the architects and De Haro counter stools by Fyrn. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">Concreteworks countertops, a Wolf range, Kallista sink, and Boffi faucet also fill the space.</span>
Dumas kept a relatively simple palette when it came to the interior. Floor-to-ceiling cabinetry in the kitchen acts as an effective noise barrier.
The new kitchen/dining room is entirely open and provides views of the garden.
The newly squared-off bay window now has a built-in bench. The teak cabinet pulls are custom. A Sub-Zero refrigerator is concealed behind teak panels, and a built-in coffee maker sits beside an inset counter.
The kitchen is outfitted with custom teak cabinetry and a black soapstone counter that extends up the backsplash and waterfalls to the floor. Dramatic built-in shelves accentuate the high ceilings.
Since Andrea is a food photographer with a passion for cooking, the architects made the kitchen the most important room in the house. The kitchen has direct access to the garden, where Andrea grows herbs and vegetables.
The homeowners love the flow of the kitchen, dining room, living room, and butler’s pantry—so much so that they've already had more parties since moving in than they did in 26 years at their prior residence.
The strand board floor is coated with a super-durable multilayer paint system. Its bright yellow hue ties together the new communal spaces, and it gave rise to the project’s name—The Yolk House.
Clay Anderson of Olson Kundig and Alex Almerico of NBBJ give their 505-square-foot home in Capitol Hill a serious upgrade on a strict budget. Adding built-in plywood bookshelves to the living room side of the kitchen island was a logical way to add storage and display space. Anderson also built a coffee table to match, using a remnant piece of blackened steel from his office, building a plywood box, and adding caster wheels. The pendant lights are simple matte black metal pipes that the couple ordered off Etsy from Greece. They also chose a Brizo matte black faucet to continue the "pipe look."
What was once a closed-off kitchen has been transformed into an efficient cooking and dining space complete with simple wood cabinets, sleek fixtures, and black accents. A mirrored backsplash reflects light, making this open space feel even larger.
What was once a small dining area has been opened up into a bright kitchen, living, and dining space.
The kitchen is at the heart of the home, and the layout is arranged so that the views can be appreciated when preparing a meal. Warm timber shelves and furniture contrast with the dark kitchen joinery to create a balanced interior palette.
The state-of-the-art kitchen features teak cabinetry, a large island, and all-new appliances.
Wine cellar
Eliminating the wall separating the kitchen from the dining room was a challenge, forcing Dupont Blouin to reconsider mechanical and electrical logistics.
The large barbecue anchors the quincho, a designated space to cook and host guests.
The kitchen’s marble counter was the only thing brought in from Santiago—all other materials were sourced locally.
As the home’s concept was developed, the dining and kitchen volume was configured first. "The idea is that it can work independently from the rest of the house; it has associated bathrooms and independent access," says Sánchez.
All of the integrated storage units and cabinetry are made of affordable maple veneer panels.
The house also references many Japanese design qualities, like materials, craftsmanship, and the home's overall aesthetic.
"We wanted to create a kitchen that would develop and become prettier with time. Something that was raw, tactile, and natural. Our kitchen reflects this thought by using materials from nature to carry the design. In Scandinavia, we have a tradition of inviting nature inside, blurring the boundaries between what is inside and outside," says Bjerre-Poulsen.
There are now two options for seating—at the end of the island or in the nook beyond.
Marble counters, custom white oak cabinetry, and terrazzo tile flooring from Ann Sacks brighten up the kitchen. "Their light tones were the right balance of Southern California modernism with the warmer, highly crafted wood carpentry that the Puget Sound region is known for," says Wittman.
The streamlined Henrybuilt kitchen features a hidden range hood and pops of color that reference the home’s red-tinted glass.
Floor-to-ceiling sliding doors open the kitchen to one of the home's two patios.
The entire interior—including bespoke joinery and furniture—is crafted from timber.
The antler chandeliers above the kitchen table are from local lighting store Milton Lighting.
"The kitchen is basic by most typical house’s standards. It’s everything that we need and nothing that we don’t," says Hudson-Smith.
Inspired by the textured brick in the adjacent properties in the neighborhood, a Victorian terrace house in Northeast England is updated with an addition that mirrors the surrounding architecture. Using the same local, handmade brick already in the home, Studio Ben Allen set out to convert the rear of the house into an airy work, dining, and storage space that fused seamlessly with the existing home. However, the addition also received a distinguishing characteristic—an arched, load-bearing roof.
This 720-square-foot apartment in Barcelona was renovated and opened up by Nook Architects. Key to the design are the original barrel-vaulted ceilings, which are mimicked in the mixed-use gallery in the front. What was once a central hallway dividing multiple rooms—typical of older apartments—became a new common space that flows into the gallery. Materials were also limited exclusively to those already present in the space—namely, wood, ceramic, and marble. A canopy of original terra-cotta tiles line the barrel-vaulted ceilings, and a minimal aesthetic ties it all together.
The kitchen countertops are black quartz, offering a strong visual contrast to the plywood. “Leïla and Xavier enjoy having friends over to sit at the kitchen island, which is the center of the space,” says architect Catherine Milanese.
In the kitchen, Ben removed a peninsula counter unit with upper cabinets, which previously separated the kitchen and dining rooms and impeded flow. Ceiling soffits were removed as well to open up the space.
Beautiful yet practical materials define the home—such as the Indian ink–washed plywood used for the kitchen cabinetry. Purchasing secondhand furnishings from eBay also helped keep costs low and add personality to the home.
The brick pictured is original to the home. “We wanted to connect our new extension against the retained rear wall of our house as a feature and acknowledgement of the original building,” says Richard. “The doorway/opening is actually the original doorway into our side alleyway and garden—we just removed the doors and tidied up slightly.”
The sink wall faces south, and the architects sought to bring in natural light while filtering the view to the driveway. Their solution was to create a "living screen" with solid walnut shelves, suspended with blackened-steel frames, that showcase glassware and plants while allowing space for a solar roll shade. Custom, laser-cut steel glass racks are mounted under the lowest shelf.
The counters and backsplash are Imperial white marble, and the hood vent received a custom metal surround.
The expansive new kitchen has a generous sliding glass door to the yard and cabinetry is outfitted in plain-sawn walnut. "The wood is close in tone to the existing mahogany woodwork, but it has a more expressive grain," says Chadbourne. "We used it at all new cabinetry in flat, flush panels. The walnut’s grain character is the design element rather than the cabinetry construction details."
In the kitchen, there is a hidden pantry, appliance storage shelves, and a food prep area. A slide-away glass backsplash reveals additional cooking gadgets behind.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.