281 Kitchen Wood Cabinets Wood Counters Design Photos And Ideas

A Cove 5 metal fireplace from Charnwood warms up the 215-square-foot cabin.
Custom cabinetry, countertops, and a dining table were crafted from salvaged wood.
Reclaimed wood from the original shed was used on the floors and ceiling in the common area.
“Drinking water comes from a 20-liter bottle, and can be delivered to the tap with a foot-operated pump, so no electricity is required,” Bene says. The bottle can sustain two people for three days.
The boat’s cabin is split into two distinct areas—the kitchen and the dining area/bedroom.
Steel open shelves allow the couple to create meaningful vignettes. "It has allowed us to curate these precious pieces, whether from a local ceramicist or other handmade items," notes Lauren. A cowboy painting by Mark Maggiori brings a touch of nostalgia to the space and nods to her childhood in rural Montana.
The new kitchen is a compact eight feet wide—and much more efficient. The IKEA cabinets have been modified and upgraded with hardware, attachments, and fixtures. A Smeg refrigerator replaces a corner cabinet and complements a European-scale cooktop and small oven.
A neutral color scheme and wood elements give the trailer a cozy, rustic feel.
The interior features durable, lightweight vinyl plank flooring, and the walls are painted Benjamin Moore Cloud White.
The banquette, countertops, floating shelves, niches, and bedframe are made from reclaimed pine.
A large metal staircase near the kitchen folds up and provides access to the loft-like sleeping area.
Nick Dignard and Marie-Catherine P. Émond built this 256-square-foot cabin, an A-Frame structure enveloped by two extended wings, to celebrate a love of outdoor sports. Located in Québec’s Lac-Beauport, the living, dining, and kitchen areas are filled with natural light so that the cabin feels as if it’s actually outside.
Pots, pans, cutlery, and shelves are hung on a pegboard wall in the kitchen, offering a clever way to utilize space that would be otherwise wasted.
Road-Haus features thoughtfully crafted details throughout, such as the leather pulls on the kitchen cabinetry.
The cozy living space features a fireplace with a mantel that doubles as a shelf or coffee table. There is the option of either an electric fireplace or a more expensive gas fireplace.
"By utilizing more windows, our homes bring the outdoors in, providing lots of natural light," says Mackay.
Get the whole family involved in the kitchen, whether it be teaching young ones a tried-and-true recipe or exploring a new dish together.
Artist Cori Creed stands in the kitchen of the vacation home in rural British Columbia that she and her husband, Craig Cameron, built with their friend and architect, Kevin Vallely. Cori made the ceramic dinnerware and pendants, while Craig built the kitchen island and installed the plywood ceiling with the help of his stepfather.
Rather than wasting precious square-footage on a utility room, the mechanics for the cabin (an on-demand water heat and a two-stage water filter) are housed in two of the kitchenette’s wall cabinets. For cooking, there’s a two-burner induction stove and full-size sink. Most of the cooking is done outside on the grill.
There is no overhead lighting here, but that’s just fine by Szczerbicki, who prefers to avoid “blasting one massive level of light.” Working closely with The Lighting Guild, he went for a more layered approach. Above the cabinetry, LED lights point up to illuminate the rafter, and a custom, linear pendant hangs above the island. “Every piece of lighting was designed with a specific task in mind,” says Szczerbicki. “As it gets darker, you slowly turn on key lights in key locations so the light level gradually grows.”
Exposed brick from the original structure remains as an “echo of the house that was here before,” says Szczerbicki.
On the opposite side of the tree house, a small kitchenette comes complete with a sink, an induction hot plate, and a small fridge underneath. Other additions include fresh flowers from local florist Stilk & Stæsj, as well as soap from the Norwegian brand Fitjar Islands.
The kitchen cabinetry, counters, and walls are covered with pale birch panels that lend lightness and texture.
The maple farmhouse table doubles as a kitchen island. The custom sink can be used as a perch for the cutting board, and a small tabletop garden provides herbs for cooking.
In the kitchen, simple farmhouse cabinetry was given a gray-green faux finish to complement the mahogany butcher-block countertops. “The client had started a renovation of the kitchen that he didn't like at all, but he didn't want to pay for new cabinets,” says architect Michael Poris. “So, we worked with the cabinets he had already installed and painted them.”
A scullery sits behind the kitchen.
The kitchen island features a top made from concrete and rimu, a native New Zealand timber. As rimu is no longer harvested, the piece was pulled from a swamp and is potentially around 1,000 years old. The split between the concrete and timber reflects the split between the flooring materials. “The faceted form of the island ties into our concept and links to the fractured forms on the exterior of the house,” says Craig.
A kitchenette includes a brass backsplash, stainless-steel sink, and black timber cabinetry where a fridge is tucked away.
A small kitchen island sits opposite a rammed earth fireplace. “This home is a very delicate balance of materials and form,” says architect Tono Mirai. “My design concept is not to add anything extra, and I aim to construct earth walls in a very sophisticated and contemporary way.”
The L-shaped kitchen is located by the entrance to the home, and has a window looking out to the north. Medicinal plants and flowers foraged from the surrounding forest are hung from the roof to dry.
Interior Designer Stephanie Dyer in the completed project.
Dyer Studio custom-designed the island with a black-stained white oak wood base and a walnut and soapstone counter that curves at both ends.
Dyer was inspired by all of the original curved details throughout the home, and wove subtle references into the kitchen’s design, including the scalloped detail in the stone counter and backsplash, the curving walls of the stove alcove, and at the coved ceilings.
Removing the dropped ceilings had a dramatic effect on the perceived size of the room. “I think the ceiling height alone changed how that space felt,” says Dyer.
The team added a bank of windows above the sink to flood the room with light. The ceiling pendants are from Allied Maker and the stool is the Cherner Counter Stool from Design Within Reach.
The color of the BlueStar range references the dining room.
Per the clients’ request, the kitchen skews to a predominantly white color palette, with the bespoke island providing contrast.
“For the ceiling dome above the cooking area, the exaggerated style and pattern add whimsy to the space and conceal the required equipment and piping,” explains the firm.
Kerf cabinetry, Heath Ceramics tile, and a BlueStar range complement stainless steel countertops and a porcelain sink in the kitchen.
The most recent renovation utilizes reasonably low-cost materials, such as pine, oak, and Carrara marble, to create a simple and cohesive palette.
In the kitchen, oak joinery and a minimal fireplace sit within a neutral, low-cost pine plywood wall.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
The kitchen features oak woodwork, black fixtures and fittings, and black hexagonal tiles that mimic the lines of the local landscape and represent the “basalt columns and moodiness of Iceland”.
The Norm Architects' SURFACE kitchen for Reform is available in three different options: smoked oak, natural oak, and metal.
The house also references many Japanese design qualities, like materials, craftsmanship, and the home's overall aesthetic.
The surface of the cabinet doors are made from saw cut veneer, which Bjerre-Poulsen says gives the design a very tactile element. "You can see and feel the groves from the saw on the surface."
"This house had something I couldn’t really describe," he shares. "There was a certain old-world atmosphere with its abandoned beauty that we both thought was extremely poetic and alluring."
The cabinetry is meant to feel like a freestanding piece of furniture, whether or not it is placed against the wall or in the center of the room.
The handles of Bjerre-Poulsen’s kitchen are bronzed tombac, a material that has been discontinued; however, Reform now offers handles in brass for a similar look.
"We wanted to create a kitchen that would develop and become prettier with time. Something that was raw, tactile, and natural. Our kitchen reflects this thought by using materials from nature to carry the design. In Scandinavia, we have a tradition of inviting nature inside, blurring the boundaries between what is inside and outside," says Bjerre-Poulsen.
Bjerre-Poulsen's personal goals were to create a space that was highly functional as well as exceedingly beautiful.
Jonas Bjerre-Polsen at home in his custom-designed Surface kitchen from Norm Architects for Reform.
The floors, cabinet face frames, upper wall panels, and the tops of the bathroom and shower are made from a recycled and re-milled factory maple and beech blend from Longleaf Lumber in Berwick, Maine. The couple kept two of the original cage doors: one at the front, and the other at the back of the bus.
Carbon bar stools by Bertjan Pot from Moooi rest under the kitchen island.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.