239 Kitchen Wood Cabinets Wood Counters Design Photos And Ideas

Kerf cabinetry, Heath Ceramics tile, and a BlueStar range complement stainless steel countertops and a porcelain sink in the kitchen.
The most recent renovation utilizes reasonably low-cost materials, such as pine, oak, and Carrara marble, to create a simple and cohesive palette.
In the kitchen, oak joinery and a minimal fireplace sit within a neutral, low-cost pine plywood wall.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
The kitchen features oak woodwork, black fixtures and fittings, and black hexagonal tiles that mimic the lines of the local landscape and represent the “basalt columns and moodiness of Iceland”.
The Norm Architects' SURFACE kitchen for Reform is available in three different options: smoked oak, natural oak, and metal.
The house also references many Japanese design qualities, like materials, craftsmanship, and the home's overall aesthetic.
The surface of the cabinet doors are made from saw cut veneer, which Bjerre-Poulsen says gives the design a very tactile element. "You can see and feel the groves from the saw on the surface."
"This house had something I couldn’t really describe," he shares. "There was a certain old-world atmosphere with its abandoned beauty that we both thought was extremely poetic and alluring."
The cabinetry is meant to feel like a freestanding piece of furniture, whether or not it is placed against the wall or in the center of the room.
The handles of Bjerre-Poulsen’s kitchen are bronzed tombac, a material that has been discontinued; however, Reform now offers handles in brass for a similar look.
"We wanted to create a kitchen that would develop and become prettier with time. Something that was raw, tactile, and natural. Our kitchen reflects this thought by using materials from nature to carry the design. In Scandinavia, we have a tradition of inviting nature inside, blurring the boundaries between what is inside and outside," says Bjerre-Poulsen.
Bjerre-Poulsen's personal goals were to create a space that was highly functional as well as exceedingly beautiful.
Jonas Bjerre-Polsen at home in his custom-designed Surface kitchen from Norm Architects for Reform.
The floors, cabinet face frames, upper wall panels, and the tops of the bathroom and shower are made from a recycled and re-milled factory maple and beech blend from Longleaf Lumber in Berwick, Maine. The couple kept two of the original cage doors: one at the front, and the other at the back of the bus.
Carbon bar stools by Bertjan Pot from Moooi rest under the kitchen island.
The ceiling is unfinished plywood covered by a metal screen that diffuses light from LED strips.
The interior of the house is lined in pine. Anchoring the dining area are an antique Norwegian farm table and chairs. The appliances are by Gaggenau.
The kitchen countertops are black quartz, offering a strong visual contrast to the plywood. “Leïla and Xavier enjoy having friends over to sit at the kitchen island, which is the center of the space,” says architect Catherine Milanese.
The kitchen area features plywood cabinetry and counters and metal shelving.
The neon pink flamingo, a wedding anniversary gift from Richard to Kristina, adds a punch of color and whimsy to the kitchen.
Beautiful yet practical materials define the home—such as the Indian ink–washed plywood used for the kitchen cabinetry. Purchasing secondhand furnishings from eBay also helped keep costs low and add personality to the home.
The brick pictured is original to the home. “We wanted to connect our new extension against the retained rear wall of our house as a feature and acknowledgement of the original building,” says Richard. “The doorway/opening is actually the original doorway into our side alleyway and garden—we just removed the doors and tidied up slightly.”
A black sink fixture accented with rose gold adds a contemporary note in the light-filled kitchen.
Light wood cabinetry and black-and-white checkerboard flooring create a simple, classic look for the kitchen, where functional elements have been pared back to a bare minimum; there’s a sink and a small amount of cabinetry where hot plates and a microwave are stored. "Our client is not a big cook and often orders out when she’s at home," Hostache says.
The kitchen retains its original plan, but it’s been updated with new counters, cabinets, appliances, and lighting. A new wood counter, sink, cantilevered shelf, and cabinets were added opposite the original kitchen counter to create a convenient space for food and drink prep.
The steps to the kitchen were designed by Netsch to the proportions of the Parthenon, necessitating half steps in between. Will and Mark regularly entertain large groups, and removable cushions provide miscellaneous seating for guests.
The original home had very few handrails along the open edges of each floor. As part of the renovation, SOM added simple handrails that would not compete with the architecture. On stairs without railings, cushions offer a gentle resistance to people standing near the edge.
Bailey integrated red and yellow accents throughout the cabin in a nod to its ’70s origins. Paprika-colored Heath tile bedecks the backsplash. The matte-black, enamel cast iron pan is by Crane Cookware.
For a change of scenery, guests can enjoy the warm, rustic kitchen.
The kitchen area is full of charm, starting with the original painted brick wall and continuing with cabinets made from reclaimed Iroko wood. The uneven application of paint mimics the aged wood.
Here, an industrial material palette—with a concrete brick backsplash and counter foundation, and zinc-plated pan-decking ceilings—complement the development’s edgy facade.
The kitchen of this Brooklyn brownstone features a brick backsplash with a metal panel connecting the Bluestar range to the Viking chimney wall hood. The mashup of materials preserves the personality of brick with the ease of cleaning stainless steel. The island and cabinets are fashioned from remilled Douglas fir beams salvaged from Upstate New York.
Artist Cori Creed stands in the kitchen of the vacation home in rural British Columbia that she and her husband, Craig Cameron, built with their friend and architect, Kevin Vallely. Cori made the ceramic dinnerware and pendants, while Craig built the kitchen island and installed the plywood ceiling with the help of his stepfather.
To complement the white-washed custom cabinetry in her kitchen, architect Julie Salles Schaffer has designed a tile backsplash to resemble "melting butter in a white pan." Daltile arranged her two-color AutoCAD design—white and off-white—onto a mesh backing for a small fee. To soften the edges of the cabinets’ drawers and doors, Schaffer requested radial edging.
Shane Michael Pavonetti, an Austin-based architect and contractor, and his wife, Holly, built their eco-friendly home on a lean budget of $175,000. The cedar siding used on the exterior reappears throughout the house. Keen on recycling the wood, the couple added shelving to their kitchen as well.
The kitchen is inspired by the commercial kitchens that the client worked at in his youth.
A view of the light-filled kitchen. Due to a tiny budget, the duo couldn’t afford to buy furniture and instead used midcentury furnishings they collected in Germany and found on Bergmann’s grandparents’ property. All of the furnishings were measured beforehand, and the modular frames were designed around them to ensure the perfect fit.
Equipped with an antique Garland stove and a custom teak wood island, the chef’s kitchen also provides direct access to the backyard. Also located on the garden level is an expansive sun room, media room, and custom-tiled powder room.
Part modern farmhouse, part gallery, this vacation home just outside Tahoe National Forest is composed of four distinct gable forms separated by square, stone-clad volumes. It was designed by Tahoe-based architect Clare Walton. The interiors were a collaborative effort between the owner, who is an artist and art collector, and interior designer Brittany Haines of ABD Studio. In the kitchen, a custom-made, six-person breakfast banquet, crafted from walnut, is organized around a table that features cold roll steel table top and a turned wood base that has been ebonized black.
The kitchen features cabinetry by bulthaup and a walnut extendable bar.
Wood finishes continue into the light-filled kitchen of Wuehrer House by Jerome Engelking, which is just steps away from the pool.
Home to Greg Truen, director of South African architecture and design firm SAOTA, Kloof 119A is a 9,150-square-foot residence in Cape Town that takes advantage of mountain and city views while de-emphasizing the street and neighboring homes. Kitchen joinery was done by Roma Casa Kitchens. Clerestory windows allow mountain views and light to drench the space.
The kitchen island of OCM House was custom-built on-site by Studio Jackson Scott using Australian Blackbutt.
The large galley kitchen lies steps away from the living room. Pale Birch cabinets on both sides of the room provide plenty of storage and counter space.
Marine plywood dominates the interior and is especially striking in the compact kitchen and its island's geometric design.
The custom-made plywood cabinetry in the kitchen was hand-impregnated with microcement.
Black ceramic tile wraps around the kitchen backsplash.
Maddison and Newstadt outfitted the interior with pre-finished cork flooring by Readycork from Premium Floors Australia. Black-painted cabinetry and a built-in bench offset unfinished shiplap timber ceiling and walls.
Vintage hand-blown pendant lighting features in the kitchen, which also has a handmade tile backsplash.
The open-plan kitchen, dining, and living space is outfitted with hoop pine plywood panels. Durable black Formply designates the kitchen area
The paneling in the Acorn model is locally sourced sugar pine, contrasted with reclaimed Redwood accents. Any wood that O’Donnell can’t salvage is FSC-certified.
A glimpse down the aisle of the El Toro. The Hobbit wood stove from Salamander Stoves is a cozy accent.
Inserting a mix of texture, raw materials and functional elements, SHED Architecture & Design was able to artfully marry the new additions with the original industrial construction in Capitol Hill Loft by using a palette of concrete brick, stainless steel plate, blackened steel, and mirror.
There's a noticeable four-inch gap in between the last two tiers of cabinets where the couple mounted a sliding library ladder in order to easily access every cabinet.
The waterfall-edge kitchen island was a non-negotiable for Catherine Williamson, but the piece of marble she found would only cover three-quarters of the length. So, the duo finished off the island with a piece of walnut that was hand-cut for them by a local carpenter. The island also features a Sinkology sink, and the front is finished with DIY wooden dowels that mimic fluted wood.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.