287 Kitchen Marble Backsplashes Design Photos And Ideas

The kitchen island features an elegant concrete top in a light tone that complements the white oak joinery and allows the Carrera marble backsplash to steal the show.
The kitchen has a large central island, with the range and workspaces on the right and a huge built-in on the left in front of the stair. A bright, white laminate wall holds the oven and refrigerator. Architect Nicholas Fiore says this element “pumps the brakes a bit” on the white oak shiplap walls and white oak ceiling.
The quartzite island in the kitchen is a grounding presence beneath the void and a focal point between the dining room and living room. The living room features a Gentry sofa by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso.
The kitchen sits at the center of the home beneath the void. Beneath the stair, sliding pocket doors conceal a pantry and kitchen appliances (such as the toaster and kettle).
The stone island bench in the kitchen is a Montenegro Quartzite from Artedomus. “Its monolithic quality really grounds the space under the towering void above,” says architect Bronwyn Litera.
A wine refrigerator and wet bar with the same finishes as the kitchen for cohesion brings more function for entertaining. “We use it more than we've ever used it before,” says Shawn. “It is no longer a dumping ground.”
Construction pausing during the pandemic turned out to be a boon: Living in the half-finished space, the couple realized they needed to open up the pass-through to the rest of the house for even more circulation.
A niche was built out for the wall ovens and a coffee counter.
Shawn, who runs Von Walter + Funk, a lifestyle boutique and event creative company, made the pendant lights over the island.
Mouser Cabinetry’s textured laminate flat-front doors were used throughout. The slim, black hardware is Europa by Top Knobs.
The couple chose Thermador appliances from Don’s Appliances. The black Nero Marquina marble counters are in a high honed finish, which kept them from becoming too gray in the finish process.
The Backed Utility Stool from Schoolhouse Electric in Sergeant Green now lines the island, offering a designated spot for guests to hang out while Jamie cooks.
The cabinetry in the kitchen is rift-sawn, dark-stained white oak that complements the ceilings and contrasts with the white walls. The dark-pigmented concrete floors were intentionally left untreated in order to convey a sense of time. “As the home ages, the floor ‘records’ the construction process, foot traffic, wine spilled at birthday parties, drips of olive oil from anniversary dinners, watermarks from relaxing showers, and so on,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Every action will be subtly set in stone before it’s quickly cleaned up or swept away. Over the years, a patina of life will build up, adding depth and beauty to the interior.”
The kitchen features a marble backsplash and a precisely placed window. The floors and internal walls are also crafted from clay and concrete.
Birch plywood with a white wash forms the cabinetry in the kitchen and the island is topped with marble. Perimeter counters are Corian. The faucet is Astra Walker and the cabinet handles are Made Measure.
The kitchen is anchored by a deep window seat with views of the harbor. “My favorite place in the house is the built-in deep daybed off the kitchen, from where I like to look out onto the water with a book in hand,” says Fox. “Having the view of the water and getting cozy in that spot is perfect.”
The light in the kitchen is Supernova by Delta. “We explored the historical idea of how traditional native dwellings had a fire at the centre of the house around which everything gathers,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “The idea of an ‘oculus’ came from this and we thought it would be fun to play off that and provide this oculus-like light that is effectively the centre point of gathering within the home.”
The large kitchen is a space for the family to gather, with a stone-look porcelain benchtop and splashback from Stone Tile. “The clients wanted the stone in the kitchen to feel natural rather than dramatic,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “It's large format porcelain, though, as I don’t think they would have been able to handle the level of patina that would have developed on a natural stone when cooking with children!”
The timber used in the scaffolding and off-cuts from the framing were kept and redeployed for furniture and accents on the walls—such as the timber block in the primary kitchen.
Marble covers the backsplash, and new upper cabinets inset with fluted glass were added.
The stainless-steel elements, including the counter and cabinets, were also kept in place for their industrial character. The island was reworked and topped with marble.
The architects reused much of the existing walnut cabinetry, giving it an ebonized finish for contrast.
The vintage-modern look is accentuated by an elegantly curved, Calacatta marble backsplash that frames the Lacanche range. The countertop is also Calacatta marble.
Without its former bulky, outdated cabinetry, the new kitchen feels much more spacious. Additional windows and a light color palette creates a breezy feel. The custom-made kitchen island was crafted from Oregon white oak with a Pyrolave (enameled lava stone) countertop. The Balls suspension light is by Parachina. JHID also seamlessly added a period-appropriate, pressed-tin ceiling that looks original to the home.
Full-height, black sliding glass doors connect the interior spaces to the rear courtyard and enable indoor/outdoor living.
Carrara marble countertops and backsplash add a luxurious feel, as does the dark green leather upholstery on the bench seating which, in a space-saving move, is essentially part of the kitchen island. The Highline linear pendant light is from Archier.
Clara kept the kitchen, which had been freshly remodeled prior to her moving in, appreciating the high-quality fixtures.
A local blacksmith fabricated metal elements for the doors, shelves, and light fittings throughout the house.
The dining table and chairs in the kitchen were handcrafted by the homeowner from timber harvested on-site.
Angelica Becerril prepares food at the kitchen island; the Carrara marble countertop is one of the few luxury materials used in the house.
The front and back doors are only 12 feet apart from one another, separated by the living space at the heart of the home. The open floor plan allows the living space, den, dining room, and kitchen to flow into each other, while the way the volumes are positioned makes each space feel distinct—this works well for entertaining both large and small groups.
A full-length skylight above the floating steel shelf in the kitchen allows light to stream across the Venetian plaster wall and bounce off the high-gloss white shelf. “It creates an ever-changing and ethereal experience,” says designer Jamie Chioco. The ceramic dishes and plates displayed on the shelf are from Kinn Home.
The kitchen countertops and backsplash are Carrara marble slabs, while the cabinetry is crafted from vertical-grain white oak, which adds warmth while contributing to the brightness of the interior palette.
The island bar in the kitchen features white Arcilla Field tiles by Ann Sacks that match the turquoise tiles used in the guest bathroom. The lights above the bench are classic VL45 Radiohus pendants, which were originally designed in the 1940s by Danish architect Vilhelm Lauritzen for Louis Poulsen for the construction of the Radiohuset building in Copenhagen.
Terrazzo flooring replaced the existing porcelain tile floor. "The terrazzo floor is about coming up with this lovely texture that wasn’t just polished concrete," explains Carter.
The kitchen island was handcrafted with 30-millimeter Tasmanian Oak half-round dowels. "The [curved form] became a real feature of the house which was mimicked in details such as the timber island and doorway threshold," explains Peake. The countertop is Carrara marble from Avant Stone.
"We always like to do floor-to-ceiling curtains: we feel it's softer and more intentional," says Peake. The light above the island is a Span Linear Pendant from Living Edge.
In the kitchen, a bank of copper-fronted cabinetry joins the pink marble backsplash. The island is set atop a curving pink base that gives it some lightness.
The cabinet doors are by Sarah Sherman Samuel for Semihandmade on Ikea boxes. The finish style is a modern take on traditional beadboard with cleaner lines and wider spacing.
White Dome Pendant lights from Allied Maker hang above the Caesarstone quartz island. The waterfall edges provide a clean, modern look.
Sarah worked with Cafe Appliances to bring her vision to life. The matte white appliances blend in with the rest of the home and the warm bronze appliance hardware adds just the right metallic accent.
A 36" matte white Cafe Appliance range with metal hardware is paired with a dramatic marble backsplash and concealed range hood with a drywall surround.
Previously, a small bathroom was located off the kitchen space. By relocating the bathroom elsewhere in the home, this freed up space for a large walk-in pantry where all the food and clutter could hide, and even the fridge.
The warmth and softness of the wood ceiling is brought down to the cabinets with elegant touches such as the brass island panels, wood counter stools, and wood hardware.
Paired with white, the wood ceiling is no longer an eye sore but a touch of warmth in this subdued and serene kitchen space.
The entrance from the dining room to the kitchen was opened up considerably with an arched expression, creating a much better flow and unifying the two spaces.
Since the home is something of a pied-à-terre for the clients, its design is geared more toward short-term stays than full-time living. That means spaces like the kitchen are set up for entertaining. Notice the curve on the cabinetry, counter, and backsplash, which is Calacatta Macchia Vecchia marble. All of the appliances are from Fisher & Paykel, and the wall sconce is a Gabriel Scott single Welles pendant in smoked glass and brushed brass.
The fresh, minimal kitchen is conveniently located off the dining room. The light-colored cabinets are treated with a high-quality factory spray-painted finish.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
"Make sure everyone in your home knows where each item goes and you'll be surprised at how big of a difference it makes," Mindell says. This philosophy applies to kids, too, who Mindell says should be as autonomous as possible in the kitchen.
"I’ve been learning that I need an efficient way to group together staples so I can easily see and decide what I need to buy from the grocery store," McGee says. She uses baskets, trays, and crocks to keep everything organized.
"The spaces and materials are very kid-friendly," says Wittman. "The natural finishes are durable and easy to clean. Organic materials with their own unique textures patina over time, which will allow the spaces to be lived in and loved while weathering gracefully for a long future."
The view from the nook to Lake Washington. The slat screen at the end of the island creates visual consistency with the revamped deck, and the glass guardrail doesn't obstruct views.
There are now two options for seating—at the end of the island or in the nook beyond.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.