165 Outdoor Walkways Design Photos And Ideas

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.

A strolling garden and a pond with a waterfall have already been brought back
A Japanese-style Bamboo water fountain sits in the driveway.
Uncovered paths lead straight down into the forest.
In consultation with the clients, Alterstudio opted to clad the house in local cypress rather than imported, FSC-certified ipe.
Rachel reclines in a daybed on the patio outside the master bedroom. In front, landscape architects Scatliff + Miller + Murray planted tall grasses on either side of the driveway to establish a prairie-like environment.
Beyond a bed of black granite rocks, an entrance is concealed in an alcove in the home’s cedar-and-weathered-steel facade. The windows were manufactured by Duxton Windows & Doors.
Owners Rachel and Nolan Ploegman's sons, Alex and Logan, run along the perimeter of their Parallelogram House in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Its raw shell and stretched geometry were conceived by 5468796 Architecture and executed by Concord Projects. Brunswick Steel assisted with the bent-plate Cor-Ten columns.
To create the feel of a seaside retreat, Mitsuori Architects included Australian Ironbark wood slats on the rear-facing wall of this rorenovated this Victoiran heritage home in Melbourne. Ironbark is an incredibly durable hardwood that turns a beautiful silvery-gray as it weathers over time.
Kevin Daly Architects created a geometric perforated, folding metal skin supported by an aluminum exoskeleton, which shades the two-story glazed courtyard-facing façade of this home in Venice, California.
Iceland prefab pioneers Tryggvi Thorsteinsson and Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir of Minarc built this Culver City family home with mnmMOD  – a customizable, locally manufactured building system of prefabricated panels the duo designed, which minimizes energy consumption and reduces a home’s carbon footprint. Made with a blend of 30 percent recycled steel and cradle-to-cradle certified extruded polystyrene, mnmMOD components can be assembled with just a screw gun.
The motif is expressed in weathered steel for a gate.
When it's retractable glass wall are open, the all-season room becomes a breezeway from the courtyard to the view of the mountains beyond.
From the interior of the courtyard the blue Uintah Mountains can be seen sprawling along the horizon.
Orpilla pecks, Apolo pedals.
The dining table, a custom design by Formwork, and red Non chairs by Komplot complement the addition’s cypress cladding.
To combat the site’s steep, uneven grade, Boeschenstein staggered a series of ipe decks around the two main volumes of the house. Atticus joins his brother, Bodhi, on the zigzag decks.
An outdoor shower in the lower courtyard includes most of the materials that define the project, including Cor-Ten steel posts, horizontal ipe slats and decking, a custom seat and towel shelf set into a natural boulder, and concrete pavers. The yard includes many elements built for play, like a water feature embedded in a concrete wall that is fed by runoff rainwater collected from the breezeway roof.
The landscape design, by Anna Boeschenstein of Grounded, followed a 2,200-square-foot extension by Formwork architects Robert and Cecilia H. Nichols. The front door is painted in Chinese Red by Sherwin-Williams.
The most sustainable element of all is the Lais’ intention to make their first home their last home as well. “Some people have this mentality of getting a starter house, then upgrading from there,” David says. “We just wanted to find a place to live in and then stay there forever.” Eventually they imagine passing the home down to their children.
In the rear of the house, a new addition extends the living space and adds a roof terrace off the second-floor master bedroom. A garden is accessible through a wall of sliding glass doors with Sapele mahogany frames, set back to control solar gain.
Rusted metal, used on three of the home’s five roofs, extends to the entrance facade, which, in a nod to northern New Mexico’s haciendas, opens to a courtyard. Rather than buy pre-rusted siding, Molly and her father oxidized the steel themselves.
Dawn Farmer looks out from her office at Darby, one of the couple’s two dogs, in the front yard. The house is clad in smooth stucco top-coated with white Venetian plaster, and has a perimeter wall made of Cor-Ten steel panels and stuccoed cinder blocks.
Generous breezeways, walkways, and overhangs frame views beyond: “It’s like a promenade, with a forest at the end of the road,” says Deb.
An ipe walkway leads past a steel gate to the guesthouse.
The hardscaping helps keep water use to a minimum. The Lais used gravel—accented by drought-tolerant bamboo—to create their side yard.
Native plantings limit the need to use water for irrigation, while a vegetable garden offers a sustainable source of produce.
Sited on a 12-acre lot, the structure peaks at 25 feet at its tallest points, providing spatial balance to its compact, 530-square-foot footprint. Large windows, a skylight, and a discrete chimney were all factors that contributed to its faceted form, which project architect Jack Ryan describes as a “carved gemstone.”
Architects Simone Carneiro and Alexandre Skaff transformed a cramped São Paulo apartment into a mid-city refuge for Simone Santos.
Perched on top of a hill, the house is accessed by a long staircase that runs up to the exterior courtyard. The dogs, naturally, take their own route.
“The unique site-plan includes the main house, a two-story dog run, and a guest cabin,” Flato says. “All are seamlessly stitched together by a grand boardwalk, making an arrival by boat or by car an equally engaging experience.” Vertical grain Western red cedar acts as the exterior siding.
The “mid-ground” between the three structures serves as a community hub. Dick takes advantage of the site’s shared bicycle storage and its proximity to a popular bike lane.
Set at the top of the vineyard, the tasting room opens up to the vineyard and valley to the north, south, and east with a structural wood glazing system providing guests with a stunning panoramic view.
To avoid the typical white barn form found throughout Napa Valley, Fernandez turned to the rustic architectural traditions of western mining communities for inspiration.
In the winter, the polished concrete floor, which faces a large south-facing opening, accumulates heat from the sun during the day and keeps this heat indoors at night.
The facade will go gray and silver natural, so its verticality, texture and colors will blend in with the vertical tree trunks of the forest.
Northeast corner at entrance
Cedar planks on the exterior walls are dyed black, and on the indoor walls, these cedar planks are dyed white.
Leading from the communal pool area to the more intimate olive tree grove, the intricate “woven” ipe boardwalk plays with a variety of lineweights and patterns. All of the wood used for the project is reclaimed.
A stone path leads from the backyard, up the hillside, and arrives at the streetside entryway. The rhythmic pattern of the concrete garage, as well as the pedestrian walkway, are front and center. The privacy of the living and sleeping areas, seen at the left through floor-to-ceiling windows, are shielded from public view by the hill and the stone wall.
“In the beginning I really wanted the container to be off the grid but solar is still very expensive in San Antonio, especially for small spaces,” says Hill. “The green roof was an element that I had not thought of at the beginning, but as it turns out saves me more money on air-conditioning than the solar would have, and is a lot prettier.”
“Stacey hopes that we can use this as a prototype for a development of artists’ studios someday—we talked about maybe siting several of them together, like an old mobile home park.” The steel sculpture is by San Antonio artist George Shroeder.
Garden
Cantilevered deck from Lake Michigan shore beach side.
Designed by Boston-based architect Sebastian Mariscal, this house, which celebrates the best of Californian indoor-outdoor living, was designed to frame views of the trees and the surrounding landscape.

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