742 Exterior Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

Windows added to the side corners of the north facade bring additional daylight indoors.
Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
The house is a five-sided prism elevated on six concrete pillars.
The Nolla Cabin was primarily built from Kerto LVL, a lightweight and durable Finnish plywood. It was then fastened together with screws.
The dwelling is fully immersed in nature, surrounded by scenic vistas and greenery.
Meticulous detailing was required to create the curved forms. The deck is built of Grey Gumand and the roof is topped with Colorbond Trimdeck Sheeting in Night Sky Finish.
All Coastal Pavilions are outfitted with a king-size bed. They also have a separate living area, including an outdoor bathtub, a bio-ethanol fireplace, as well as Wi-Fi and local treats.
Site placement was a lengthy process as the architects searched to optimize seclusion and spectacular views. Specialists, including ecologist Mark Wapstra, were brought on board to survey the site and ensure minimal landscape impact.
All of the cabin's energy needs run off of renewable sources. Solar panels, installed on one side of the roof, power the structure's electricity.
The Wallas stove, seen next to the entrance, runs on Neste MY Renewable Diesel. The Fiskars kettle that sits atop the stove was crafted from at least 70 percent recycled content that includes old kettles and pans.
Mirror panels cover one side of the roof to reflect heat and prevent the cabin from overheating.
Nolla Cabin can be accessed via a 20-minute boat ride from the Helsinki market square.
The cabin's "paws" elevate the structure, making it easy to transport and assemble. This also helps to not leave a trace on the landscape.
Longitude 131 in Yulara, Australia
The spruce timber structures are clad in South African pine and fitted with Brits Isotherm recycled plastic insulation and Coverland Undertile membrane vapour barrier.
"Maintenance is relentlessly ongoing, and constant vigilance is needed to ensure that the wind does not undermine the structures, which are fixed to poles bedded deeply in the sand," says Maritz.
In addition to the guest cabins, main lounge, and dining spaces, the luxury lodge includes full on-site staff accommodation, as well as back-of-house services—including kitchen, storage, workshop, laundry, water supply, energy systems, and a sewer treatment.
"The siding was installed by using a revolutionary new 'Lignoloc' nailing system from Beck, whereby timber nails are driven into the wood to fix it to the support frames," explains Maritz. "This is the first time it has been used under such conditions, and will be watched with interest for it performance. "
The scenic desert habitat is home to a rich ecosystem and desert-adapted animals, including hyenas, lions, elephants, oryx, and giraffes.
The temporary lodge was born from a joint venture between Piet du Plooy, the late owner of Namibia-based travel agency Trip Travel, Journeys Namibia, and Natural Selections.
Shipwreck Lodge is located near the dry mouth of the Hoarusib River amidst a landscape of windswept sand dunes and salt-tolerant plants.
"Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day," explain the architects. "They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass."
"With both sliding doors open, the two decks connect seamlessly through the building, dramatically changing the sense of scale, space, and connection to the site."
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
When not in use, a lattice panel covers the facade, closing off and protecting the cabin when the couple is back in the city.
Surrounding the deck at the entrance of the cabin is a lattice-wood frame that serves as a shelter for the outdoor area.
Large sliding glass doors connect the interior spaces to the outdoor elements.
The simple black box is broken by operable glazing, drawing the outdoor elements in.
The wood exterior blends in quietly with the surrounding timber.
The house is composed of three volumes, two of which come together at an angle to capture views of the surrounding landscape.
"The forms interpret the township’s alpine setting using height, volume, and pitch to create a dynamic experience as one moves between buildings and between internal spaces," says Allfrey. "Openings are carefully placed to ensure a casual connection between buildings."
Three separate structures surround an elevated dining platform and sunken terrace. Each of these buildings contains its own sleeping areas, which allows a degree of privacy and independence for family members and guests.
Originally created by Guy Chirico Sr. in 1966 as the Scribner Hollow Motor Lodge, the property was designed with modernist elements during a time when the Catskills really started to become the place to be for NYC-dwellers to escape. Since then, the Hudson Valley has seen a massage amount of development that caters to creatives seeking an inspirational refuge.
Mill Valley Cabins
Black steel covers the steeply pitched roof, while the exterior walls are wrapped in charred cedar.
The 700-square-foot cabin features a steeply pitched roof that is nearly 23 feet in height.
The architects say that the mirrored finish hasn't caused any problems with the local wildlife.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
A view of the cabin from the frozen lake. Here, the existing property can be seen to the right of the cabin.
forrest view
Each prefabricated unit is covered in aluminum but built from SIPS (Structurally Insulated Panels) that consist of thick insulation sandwiched between plywood panels. These high-performance panels keep the interior protected from the desert's ambient heat.
Red ALPOLIC aluminum composite panels have been used for the exterior cladding.
The north-end of the cabin features an outdoor deck.
The prefab cabin is elevated atop six metal pillars to minimize site impact.
The prefab cabin is a 40-minute hike from Kandalaksha.
Energy-efficient VELUX windows have been installed in the south-facing glazed wall.
The cabin is located in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, just a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík, and can only be accessed by car. The area is remote, private, and quiet, making it ideal for viewing the Northern Lights at night, as well as hiking during the day.
In addition to the hot tub, there is also a 129-square-foot outdoor terrace on site with a small table and two chairs for al fresco meals.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
A large pitched-top door, and a small pitched-top window are cut out from each of the four sides of the chalet’s exterior walls.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.