822 Exterior Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

The entrance is located between the two volumes, which are oriented in slightly different directions.
The first volume contains the living areas, while the second contains two bedrooms.
The Kustavi has a monopitch roof, high windows and ceilings, two sheltered terraces, and a master bedroom with either a tall panoramic window, or a sliding door.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
The cabin’s exterior walls and roof are clad in overlapping stone plates that mimic the look of traditional wood paneling found in Western Norway. “It provides an affinity with the cabins nearby,” partner and architect Nils Ole Bae Brandtzæg explains. Solar panels cover the chimney pipe, lighting LED lamps inside.
Cabin Knapphullet is small cabin inspired by its location nestled between large rocks and low vegetation of the Sandefjord coast in Norway. It is only 323 square feet, but contains an open living space with a bathroom and a mezzanine bed that sleeps two people. Although the building occupies a small footprint, the space expands vertically over four levels including a roof terrace.
Built entirely of wood, this cabin in the forest of Ingarö was constructed in close collaboration with local builders and local woodworking companies and was inspired by its sylvan setting.
Nestled in a forest of tall pines in the Stockholm Archipelago, the exterior of this island home is clad entirely in folded black sheet metal. Three glazed sliding doors with hardwood frames provide entrances and direct access to the outdoor areas.
Designed by TYIN tegnestue Architects and built by the owners themselves, this cottage celebrates traditional back-to-nature elements in traditional Norwegian culture. Situated amidst marshland, sea-adjacent rock and scattered pine-and juniper-vegetation, careful consideration was made to protect the sensitive surrounding terrain. Only 328 feet from the sea, some marsh had to be cleared in preparing for the construction, exposing bedrock and integrating the cottage within the landscape.
A light-weight building in glass and wood, this summerhouse in the Stockholm archipelago has been inspired by its location with its dark wood exterior and abundance of windows to take in the stunning view.
The concept of this Scandinavian getaway was simple: To create a cabin that is small and sparse yet spatially rich. The 55-quare-meter (592-square-foot) cabin, commissioned by a private client and completed in 2016, comprises a large living room, bedroom, ski room, and small annex with a utility room. It functions off the water and electricity grids.
The natural slope of the site was perfect for dividing the house into split levels. The exterior is clad in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, which contrasts nicely with the charcoal bricks.
The cabin has raw concrete foundations set upon the rocky cape.
“At night, the chalet is transformed. When it is dark, the mirror effect of the reflection of the interior space in the windows completely changes the cabin’s relationship to its site and makes it appear larger,” adds Rasselet.
La Binocle is segmented into two volumes that reach outwards towards the tree canopy.
Winner of the 2011 Log House of the Year Award, the 1,206-square-meter Lokki, which was designed by as architect Kari Lappalainen and furnished by interior designer Hanni Koroma, has an inverted pitch roof that’s inspired by seagull wings.
This stunning forest retreat in England uses prefabricated panels to minimize site impact, shorten construction time, and protect against weather.
Built for $148,500, Casa Montaña was manufactured in a Madrid factory before being assembled in a mountainous, coastal region in Northwestern Spain.
Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
Perched atop a mountain on over six acres of woods, this young couple's weekend getaway incorporates the old with the new.
With floor-to-ceiling windows, and custom shutter-deck enclosure, the 500 SF cabin feels totally connected to the natural landscape.
The charred cedar exterior gently basks in the Alaskan sun.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Transformer or beach hut? Positioned in a coastal erosion zone, this holiday retreat for a family of five is completely capable of being relocated. An oversized shutter allows for protection from the elements when not in use and opens to allow sun in during the winter or provide shade on hot summer days. Waikato, New Zealand. By Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
According to Remijnse, since the only direction they could build on the small site was up, they decided to add height with a gabled roof.
The Outward Bound cabins' steel frames lift the structures above a three-foot snowpack while supporting corrugated-steel "snow roofs."
The solar panels on the roof often get covered in a heavy layer of snow, but with periodic clearing, they are as effective during the sunny days of winter as they are during fairer weather.
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named "Ufogel," which is a melding of the acronym UFO and "vogel," meaning bird in German.
The Lost Whiskey Cabin stands on a rocky bluff overlooking Virginia's countryside.
The walls of the cabin are made of pre-cast concrete panels that GreenSpur manufactured in their warehouse, then shipped to the site to reduce construction time and on-site exposure.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
Designed by architects and experienced sailor Kari Leppänen, Honka’s Saari villa was built with 134-milimeter thick square logs treated with a dark finish, and has three-meter wide eaves that provide shade, and wind protection for the outdoor patio.
Honka’s Kippari log homes come with large windows that are perfect for framing beautiful natural sceneries.
This wilderness sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland was built with 112-millimeter thick squrae logs, and has a 1,028-square-foot outdoor terrace.
This house has a sauna and four bedrooms, including a master bedroom on the second level that looks down onto the lake.
A Honka model called Kommodori was used for this seaside home,
Cho’s recently completed vacation retreat, the Concrete Box House, was inspired by the use of raw materials. Cho decided on grape vines as an unusual landscape element.
One of the main goals of the construction was to do as little harm as possible to the existing environment, which includes waterways that salmon depend upon. Herrin and his team created a garden roof that covers the full extent of the home to meet this objective. “This helps control storm water runoff and also replaces lost insect habitat—insects being a critical food source for juvenile salmon,” he says.
Erin Moore of FLOAT Architectural Research and Design, based in Tucson, Arizona, designed a 70-square-foot writer’s retreat in Wren, Oregon, for her mother, Kathleen Dean Moore, a nature writer and professor of philosophy at nearby Oregon State University. The elder Moore wanted a small studio in which to work and observe the delicate wetland ecosystem on the banks of the Marys River. Enlisting her daughter’s design expertise, her professor husband’s carpentry savoir faire, the aid of friends, and a front loader, Kathleen and her crew erected the structure in September 2007. Photo by Gary Tarleton. Totally off the grid—–Kathleen forgoes the computer and writes by hand when there—–the Watershed was designed to tread as lightly on the fragile ecosystem as the wild turkeys and Western pond turtles that live nearby. “
Wood from the property’s felled trees was incorporated into every room in the 3,000-square-foot house.
This dwelling joins a number of structures—such as a boathouse and guesthouse—owned by one family and used for vacations. They needed a new house to accommodate new generations at the reatreat.
“From the street, it appears as a rectangular building with sloping shed roofs, but this is actually an illusion,” Hutchison notes. “The floor plan is actually U-shaped, wrapping around an entry courtyard that is contained by the continuous west facade.” A standing seam metal roof by Custom Bilt Metals blends in with the cedar siding.
A shark-skinning shack.
Debbi Gibbs loved the seeming wilderness of the area, especially considering its relative proximity to her New York apartment. She bought a ramshackle cabin with plans to tear it down and start fresh, then bided her time until she found just the right architects. Enter Joseph Tanney and Robert Luntz of Resolution: 4 Architecture, who granted her wish for an open prefabricated structure with custom design touches.
“This was really a parameter-driven project,” explains Lukasz Kos, a Toronto-based designer and cofounder of the architecture firm Testroom. “That is, I had to let the trees decide how the tree house would be.”

What the trees decided, apparently, was that they wanted a gracefully slender, Blade Runner–like elevator lodged between them. They also decided they didn’t want to be too mutilated in the process. Kos responded to their needs with the low-impact 4Treehouse, a lattice-frame structure that levitates above the forest floor of Lake Muskoka, Ontario, under the spell of some witchy architectural magic.

He created this effect by suspending the two-ton, 410-square-foot tree house 20 feet above the ground with steel airline cables. With only one puncture hole in each of the four trunks into which the cable is anchored, the trees get away almost entirely unscathed, and the structure attains the visual effect of being suspended weightlessly in midair. 

At the base of the tree, a staircase rolls on casters upon two stone slabs, allowing occupants to enter and exit regardless of how much the tree house may be swaying or rocking in the wind. Solid plywood walls punctuated by a floor of red 

PVC constitute the “opaque” base story, which is largely protected from the outside elements. “The idea was to have the tree house open up as it gained elevation,” explains Kos. The second story is surrounded by a vertical lattice frame, allowing for breezes, air, and light to filter softly through walls while still establishing a visual perimeter between outside and inside space. At top, the tree house is completely penned in, a suspended patio with a ceiling of sky.  br> br>Photo by Lukasz Kos.
A wooden home nestled amongst a cluster of Japanese larch trees offers a perfect sanctuary from nearby Tokyo. Chubu, Japan. By Koji Tsutsui & Associates from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Joussard, Lesser Slave Lake, Alberta, 2011
The steel-clad Rolling Huts designed by Olson Kundig Architects in Manzama, Washington, sit lightly on the land thanks to wheels that allow the tiny residences to "hover" above the site, optimizing views of the landscape. Photo by Derek Pirozzi.
HotBox: Michaela MacLeod and Nicholas Croft (Toronto)

A mysterious monolith on the landscape, this warming hut, a cubic room wrapped in rubber and egg shell crate foam, provides a space for socialization.
Rolling Huts by Olson Kundig

There are a lot reasons to follow Olson Kundig on Instagram. One of them is their seminal Rolling Huts project.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.