171 Exterior Cabin Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The house is composed of three volumes, two of which come together at an angle to capture views of the surrounding landscape.
The 700-square-foot cabin features a steeply pitched roof that is nearly 23 feet in height.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
Each prefabricated unit is covered in aluminum but built from SIPS (Structurally Insulated Panels) that consist of thick insulation sandwiched between plywood panels. These high-performance panels keep the interior protected from the desert's ambient heat.
Red ALPOLIC aluminum composite panels have been used for the exterior cladding.
The north-end of the cabin features an outdoor deck.
The prefab cabin is elevated atop six metal pillars to minimize site impact.
The prefab cabin is a 40-minute hike from Kandalaksha.
Energy-efficient VELUX windows have been installed in the south-facing glazed wall.
The cabin is located in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, just a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík, and can only be accessed by car. The area is remote, private, and quiet, making it ideal for viewing the Northern Lights at night, as well as hiking during the day.
In addition to the hot tub, there is also a 129-square-foot outdoor terrace on site with a small table and two chairs for al fresco meals.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
A large pitched-top door, and a small pitched-top window are cut out from each of the four sides of the chalet’s exterior walls.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.
The chalet is built entirely out of Jura forest Fir wood planks.
The exterior siding is in a traditional board and batten style, then accented with a steel roof and windows.
The couple wanted the cabin to mesh with its beautiful natural surroundings. "To us this meant small," says Kenny. "We wanted the design to put you right into the landscape, and by making it small we feel drawled by the night sky and mountains that surround us."
The profile is also a reference to rural sheds common throughout the countryside.
The roof overhang is painted white to bounce more light indoors.
A short set of stairs leads up to the glazed entrance of the Week’nder.
The three-bedroom home's gabled roof mimics the shape of a tent.
The Week’nder was constructed from two prefabricated modules.
The exterior is coated in Sherwin Williams Solid Wood stain.
Naturally rusted steel sheathes the cabins that Malek Alqadi built on a 1954 homestead outside Joshua Tree National Park. “I loved the idea of stitching the existing structure back together, reinforcing it, and giving it life again without compromising the beautiful setting it’s in,” he says.
Instead of installing rooftop solar panels, Alqadi and his friend and partner in the venture, Hillary Flur, built a “solar tree” to provide energy.
The void between the cabins was an integral part of Alqadi’s vision for a retreat that fosters communion with the environment. A ladder affixed to the side of the smaller cabin leads to the stargazing portal. Electromagnetic shutters are operated via an iPad.
“There’s a presence to that place—it’s vast, and constantly shifting,” Moffitt says. “It was clear that this house should be an observation shed for the changing landscape beyond.”
The pinwheel plan also led to the creation of two sheltered outdoor spaces: the morning porch and the evening porch.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
During the winter, the Youngs go on long ski tours and warm up in the sauna.
In summer, the cabin makes an excellent base for mountain biking, canoeing, kayaking, and fishing.
Located on the northern edges of the Nordmarka wilderness region, Mylla Cabin offers easy access to cross-country skiing, as well as fishing at Mylla Lake located just below.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
On the northwestern tip of Scotland’s Isle of Skye is a vacation rental that's inspired by the region’s traditional “crofter style” cottages, but covered with a skin of tin.  
Designed and built by Gill Smith and Alan Dickson of Scottish practice Rural Design Architects, this house sits along the rugged Isle of Skye coast and has a rudimentary form that recalls children’s drawings of pitched-roof homes.  
Smith and Dickson constructed the house using corrugated metal sheeting, which is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the French country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
A bothy is a small Scottish laborer’s hut or mountain refuge.
The cabin measures roughly 120 square feet with a rectangular plan.
The succulent planter facade is a low-maintenance living wall.
Every “Seed Stitch” ceramic tile is made intentionally unique.
Over 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the 120-square-foot backyard building’s wooden balloon frame.
Envisioned as a livable or rentable ADU, the one-room gabled structure is weathertight, structurally sound, and designed for longevity.
Exterior of a Honka kit home.
A Honka model called Kommodori was used for this seaside home,
The bothy was designed as low-impact architecture, meant to enhance the experience of spending time in nature.
The bothy was designed as low-impact architecture, meant to enhance the experience of spending time in nature.
The Bothy can be installed on site in just a number of hours.
The Bothy’s clean outline conceals a drainage system and 10cm of wood-fiber insulation.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.