284 Exterior Cabin Building Type House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Night view from the sea
Honka’s Kippari log homes come with large windows that are perfect for framing beautiful natural sceneries.
A Honka model called Kommodori was used for this seaside home,
Only local materials were used to build the chalet, including the larch wood cladding of the exterior, to reinforce the connection between indoors and outdoors.
The trailer is clad in corrugated fiberglass and steel, and internally lined in used, cleaned shuttering plywood. All of the joinery is from plywood offcuts, including the two staircases. Handrails are made from offcuts of blue rope, left over from Studio in the Woods. High levels of natural light are provided by both gable ends which are ‘glazed’ with high-performance interlocking polycarbonate.
The constraints informed the building design, and were embraced—for example, the cladding that was milled at the end was only enough to partially clad the studio.
Each villa is composed of a series of spaces, varying from two to three bedrooms, and offers different views out to the ocean. Overlapping timber roofs made from recycled teak planks and built by local craftsman provide shade from the powerful sun.
The steel firebox situated on the central axis is a ruin from the fire and functions as a centerpiece for outdoor space.
The ground floor of the two-story structure includes a living room, dining room, and three bedrooms—all with en-suite bathrooms. It also features a huge loft area with an additional living space, bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Each level has an outdoor terrace, while the lower terrace has a barbecue.
The only clue to the property's past life are the train tracks which traverse the garden.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
Located on a rocky seaside plot in Inkoo, Finland, this family home designed by architect Katja Jämsä was built with 204-millimeter wide Honka Fusion non-settling laminated timber, and includes large glass windows and doors.
Architects Jaakko and Elizaveta Parkkonen designed and built Savukvartsi as their own city home, which they share with their parents and children.
Designed by architects and experienced sailor Kari Leppänen, Honka’s Saari villa was built with 134-milimeter thick square logs treated with a dark finish, and has three-meter wide eaves that provide shade, and wind protection for the outdoor patio.
Winner of the 2011 Log House of the Year Award, the 1,206-square-meter Lokki, which was designed by as architect Kari Lappalainen, and furnished by interior designer Hanni Koroma, has an inverted pitch roof that’s inspired by seagull wings.
This wilderness sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland was built with 112-millimeter thick squrae logs, and has a 1,028-square-foot outdoor terrace.
This house has a sauna and four bedrooms, including a master bedroom on the second level that looks down onto the lake.
The exterior of Kide, a sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland.
A-Frame Entrance and Facade
In the tower pod, there’s an open plan master bedroom and bathroom on the top floor with the children’s bedroom, utility, and bathroom underneath. The pod on the opposite end is for guests and can be closed off when they don’t need it.
The home’s design began with a traditional cabin form that broke off from there to split, twist, and rotate into four pods. The residence perfectly blends with the surrounding landscape with its larch lad exterior.
First, a concrete slat was poured into the ground with strategically placed dwarf walls built on top. Working as an adjustable “raft,” a floating structural frame was placed on top of the walls allowing for potential movement. If that happens, there are mechanical jacks placed underneath the frame in case the house needs to be leveled again.
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
Another view of the back of the building.
A traditional trullo home in the town of Cisternino in Italy's Puglia region.
A cutaway in the structure's cubic shape forms a front porch, where a graphic yellow door welcomes visitors. The roof slopes downwards, holding more intimate spaces at its lower end.
A small porch on the southern facade leads down to the lake.
In summer, trees help to filter out some of the heat during the warmer days.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
The site needed a path that would let residents easily ascend from the bank to the house. The architects created one by simply replicating the way they had naturally walked up the site the first time they visited. The result is a meandering trail that directs visitors to the landscape’s different features — whether a majestic Arbutus tree, a private stone beach, or a wildflower clearing.
Sited on a lake near Bracebridge, Ontario, this small-footprint family cottage was designed by Toronto firm superkül to integrate with its natural surroundings and minimize its environmental impact. The clients, a married couple, had mixed feelings about going completely modern with their cabin's aesthetic, so the architects created a sculptural wood form to bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary. Photo by Shai Gil.
The house’s materials are also influenced by Bavarian-alpine traditions — mainly larchwood in form of tongue-and-groove boards for the façade and as shingles on the roof.

Photo by Sebastian Schels
Good wood - Alpine living in style… introducing the delectable ‘Chalet Anzerre’ in Anzerre, Switzerland by Dutch architects SeARCH.
Lacroix Chessex Architectes realized La Maison aux Jeurs, a cabin in Les Jeurs, Switzerland situated on a rocky hill above the road. The structure is divided into two volumes that are angled 45 degrees apart with a connection on the mountain side. Both volumes are designed with different views of the valley below.
Context and Contrast in the Alps | Austria

An Austrian vacation home’s design references its mountainside setting and expansive views across the valley. By Tom Lechner / LP Architektur
A ramp leads to into the living areas located in the upper volume.
A sheltered walkway  provides shade in summer, and admits the lower winter sun indoors to warm up the dark-dyed, glossy concrete floors.
With the majority of the house's windows facing down the slope, not only does Bornstein maximize the views out, but he assured that his home would have loads of natural light pouring in, even if it only lasts for a few hours in winter.
Adding 290 square feet to this already small (just 566 square feet) black A-frame in Brecht, Belgium, was all the local building ordinances allowed, but the architects at dmvA found that a single wing extended out to the side gave resident Rini van Beek all the storage and living space that she needs.
The home’s location in Sterzing, Italy meant that it was surrounded by a rural green landscape, and the architects sought to change it as little as possible.
The deep fissure through the end gable of the home was due to settlement of sand below the ground, but it also gave the home its distinctive character.
The newly constructed wing consists of a combination of stones from existing walls on the property, wood siding, glazed panels, and a new roof.
Exterior view showing warped roof plane over living space

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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