195 Exterior Cabin Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

Clear Rock Lookout seen at dusk.
Lemmo Architecture and Design received a 2017 AIA Austin award for the Clear Rock Lookout, one of their first commissions.
A low-impact design approach informed the compact, elevated footprint and grated metal walkways. Rainwater is channeled from the roof (covered in local stone) into a rain barrel.
"The modern form contrasts with the Hill Country vernacular used on the rest of the 1,000-acre West Texas ranch," notes the firm.
In contrast to the glazed writer's studio, the hunting blind is punctuated by two thin windows.
The weathering steel exterior pays homage to the owner’s youth, which was spent welding oil tanks.
A grated metal footbridge with hog-wire, guard-rail panels connects the top of the mesa from the west side to the observation deck. Stairs lead to the glazed studio and hunting blind below.
Fronted with full-height, double-glazed openings, the studio frames east-facing views of the creek-bed and beyond.
The home also includes a small outbuilding that echoes the main building's monochromatic, gabled form.
The vertical corrugated metal siding mimics the verticality of the trees.
A large cedar deck offers outdoor entertaining opportunities. The outdoor furnishings are by COOP Etabli.
A pathway winds through the woods from the parking pad to reveal the cottage and a raised cedar walkway.
A view of the house from the southeast approach.
Nestled in the woods, Chalet Grand-Pic was completed for construction costs of approximately $227,000.
Originally built in 1974 as a kit home, the A-Frame was constructed with cedar siding and metal roofing. The house faces east toward the water.
Because the studio does not have air-conditioning, it relies on natural ventilation for passive cooling. Its north orientation harnesses good solar gains.
The small studio is sited along a gentle slope and is raised upon steel supports to take in views of the tree canopies.
The home's modular design is composed of an outer shell and an interior core unit that contains essential living functions, such as a bed, bathroom, and a small kitchenette.
A timber-land bridge connects the cabin to a decked terrace.
Set at an elevation of nearly 4,000 feet, La Dacha is lifted into an evergreen canopy.
Backed up to the foothills of the Andes, La Dacha offers fantastic opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, as well as skiing in the winter.
In summer, the living area is surrounded by grass that covers the terrain. Yet, once winter comes, this same area appears to be nestled within a blanket of snow.
The home has warm interiors throughout and boasts a minimalist, cabin-like aesthetic.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
The chiflonera leads to the entrance of the cabin.
Silvertop Ash shiplap siding clads the facade.
Even though the house can be connected to the city grid, it also has solar panels that collect energy from the sun and can produce its own energy.
Taking inspiration from the tradition of the Danish sommerhus, each volume is a simple, gabled form, clad in dark gray-stained cedar siding with standing-seam metal roofs that mirror the vertical grooves in a similar shade.
"With both sliding doors open, the two decks connect seamlessly through the building, dramatically changing the sense of scale, space, and connection to the site."
Site placement was a lengthy process as the architects searched to optimize seclusion and spectacular views. Specialists, including ecologist Mark Wapstra, were brought on board to survey the site and ensure minimal landscape impact.
The south side with reclaimed frosted glass and operable windows.
The cabin is composed of six prefabricated modules placed side by side atop a six-meter long iron frame.
On the first floor of Casa R is a woodshed and a "chiflonera." This area between the interiors and exteriors is commonly found in Chilean/Patagonian homes, as it helps to regulate the region’s extreme temperature changes.
“The cabin is elevated from the ground, and has slopes on the terraces and two floors. The slopes blends with the natural terrain and help reduce costs in foundations. The roof also has a steep slope to protect it from snowfall in the winter,” explains Lagos.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
Lagos has raised the cabin above the ground on supporting steel to avoid damaging any of the existing trees on site.
The home is spread across two floors.
Nicknamed "The Spaceship," the small UFO-inspired cottage includes a tiny utility kitchen, bathroom, and storage.
Some pavilions overlook the water, while others are nestled further into the coastal bushland.
The exterior Red Ironbark cladding was charred—using the Shou Sugi Ban technique—to increase the longevity of the timber and as a nod to the significance of fire.
"Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day," explain the architects. "They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass."
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
The house is composed of three volumes, two of which come together at an angle to capture views of the surrounding landscape.
"The forms interpret the township’s alpine setting using height, volume, and pitch to create a dynamic experience as one moves between buildings and between internal spaces," says Allfrey. "Openings are carefully placed to ensure a casual connection between buildings."
Three separate structures surround an elevated dining platform and sunken terrace. Each of these buildings contains its own sleeping areas, which allows a degree of privacy and independence for family members and guests.
Black steel covers the steeply pitched roof, while the exterior walls are wrapped in charred cedar.
The 700-square-foot cabin features a steeply pitched roof that is nearly 23 feet in height.
The architects say that the mirrored finish hasn't caused any problems with the local wildlife.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
A view of the cabin from the frozen lake. Here, the existing property can be seen to the right of the cabin.
forrest view
Red ALPOLIC aluminum composite panels have been used for the exterior cladding.
The north-end of the cabin features an outdoor deck.
The prefab cabin is elevated atop six metal pillars to minimize site impact.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.