147 Exterior Cabin Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

Black steel covers the steeply pitched roof, while the exterior walls are wrapped in charred cedar.
The 700-square-foot cabin features a steeply pitched roof that is nearly 23 feet in height.
The architects say that the mirrored finish hasn't caused any problems with the local wildlife.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
A view of the cabin from the frozen lake. Here, the existing property can be seen to the right of the cabin.
forrest view
Red ALPOLIC aluminum composite panels have been used for the exterior cladding.
The north-end of the cabin features an outdoor deck.
The prefab cabin is elevated atop six metal pillars to minimize site impact.
The prefab cabin is a 40-minute hike from Kandalaksha.
Energy-efficient VELUX windows have been installed in the south-facing glazed wall.
The cabin is located in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, just a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík, and can only be accessed by car. The area is remote, private, and quiet, making it ideal for viewing the Northern Lights at night, as well as hiking during the day.
In addition to the hot tub, there is also a 129-square-foot outdoor terrace on site with a small table and two chairs for al fresco meals.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
A large pitched-top door, and a small pitched-top window are cut out from each of the four sides of the chalet’s exterior walls.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.
The chalet is built entirely out of Jura forest Fir wood planks.
“The factory-built modules were carefully transported up winding roads and set in place without harming a single tree,” adds the firm.
Each cabin was assembled from single, mostly completed modules craned into place and raised atop concrete piers. The cabins include a bedroom and bathroom, a study desk, a  covered porch and a fire pit.
The exterior siding is in a traditional board and batten style, then accented with a steel roof and windows.
The couple wanted the cabin to mesh with its beautiful natural surroundings. "To us this meant small," says Kenny. "We wanted the design to put you right into the landscape, and by making it small we feel drawled by the night sky and mountains that surround us."
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
The profile is also a reference to rural sheds common throughout the countryside.
Chin abstracted a simple gable form—a profile which is more common in the area—to create a more contemporary asymmetrical profile.
The roof overhang is painted white to bounce more light indoors.
A short set of stairs leads up to the glazed entrance of the Week’nder.
The three-bedroom home's gabled roof mimics the shape of a tent.
The Week’nder was constructed from two prefabricated modules.
The exterior is coated in Sherwin Williams Solid Wood stain.
Erecting a modern cabin where a tool shed once stood became a family exercise for architect Jim Cutler and his daughter, Hannah, who worked with him on the design and build.
The 925-square-foot house Maggie Treanor calls home blends into the landscape somewhat; with a galvanized steel shed roof and siding, it looks like a high-design little brother to the barns on the surrounding farms.
Naturally rusted steel sheathes the cabins that Malek Alqadi built on a 1954 homestead outside Joshua Tree National Park. “I loved the idea of stitching the existing structure back together, reinforcing it, and giving it life again without compromising the beautiful setting it’s in,” he says.
Instead of installing rooftop solar panels, Alqadi and his friend and partner in the venture, Hillary Flur, built a “solar tree” to provide energy.
The void between the cabins was an integral part of Alqadi’s vision for a retreat that fosters communion with the environment. A ladder affixed to the side of the smaller cabin leads to the stargazing portal. Electromagnetic shutters are operated via an iPad.
Lightweight corrugated zinc roof sheeting clads the exterior.
David Ferguson of Kimo Estate took construction into his own hands in a two-person owner-builder team.
The glazed door and other openings allow guests to enjoy sunset views from bed.
The A-frame structure is elevated on pad footings.
Stargazing is easy thanks to the lack of light pollution.
JR's Hut is an off-grid glamping destination near Gundagai, NSW.
Rolling Huts by Olson Kundig

There are a lot reasons to follow Olson Kundig on Instagram. One of them is their seminal Rolling Huts project.
“There’s a presence to that place—it’s vast, and constantly shifting,” Moffitt says. “It was clear that this house should be an observation shed for the changing landscape beyond.”
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
It takes three to five days to install a Vipp Shelter onsite.
Lake House
On the northwestern tip of Scotland’s Isle of Skye is a vacation rental that's inspired by the region’s traditional “crofter style” cottages, but covered with a skin of tin.  
Designed and built by Gill Smith and Alan Dickson of Scottish practice Rural Design Architects, this house sits along the rugged Isle of Skye coast and has a rudimentary form that recalls children’s drawings of pitched-roof homes.  
Smith and Dickson constructed the house using corrugated metal sheeting, which is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
Dynamic rooflines create interesting forms while simultaneously opening clerestory windows perfect for letting in natural light to each studio.
Torontonians Dan and Diane Molenaar head north to Drag Lake when they need a weekend away from urban life—though they brought some of the city with them. The mirrored windows that circle the cottage were recycled from two office towers in Toronto.
A bothy is a small Scottish laborer’s hut or mountain refuge.
Night view from the sea

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.