348 Exterior Cabin Building Type Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A-Frame Entrance and Facade
In the tower pod, there’s an open plan master bedroom and bathroom on the top floor with the children’s bedroom, utility, and bathroom underneath. The pod on the opposite end is for guests and can be closed off when they don’t need it.
The home’s design began with a traditional cabin form that broke off from there to split, twist, and rotate into four pods. The residence perfectly blends with the surrounding landscape with its larch lad exterior.
First, a concrete slat was poured into the ground with strategically placed dwarf walls built on top. Working as an adjustable “raft,” a floating structural frame was placed on top of the walls allowing for potential movement. If that happens, there are mechanical jacks placed underneath the frame in case the house needs to be leveled again.
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
Another view of the back of the building.
The house cantilevers out over the landscape for unimpeded views. “It’s canted wall defines the main entrance and creates a covered space for unpacking and packing—a familiar family ritual,” Howat says.
Modern yurts haven’t abandoned this consideration of the spiritual—just ask Adrian Larralde, an entrepreneur who designed and built a mountaintop yurt just outside Santa Barbara, California. Now available to rent through Glamping Hub, the yurt began as a personal project. Entranced by yurts and the serene experience of being in them, Larralde enlisted his father, a general contractor, to help build one on the family’s site on Refugio Mountain, overlooking the Channel Islands. The area, Larralde says, boasts a rich history.
A small porch on the southern facade leads down to the lake.
In summer, trees help to filter out some of the heat during the warmer days.
Paved walkways connect each unit to the public spaces.
The Pine Plains, New York, home of Elise and Arnold Goodman boasts 48 windows, the largest of which measures 8'6'' by 7'6''. As architect Preston Scott Cohen explains, the "free facade makes it impossible to identify how many levels there are, or even to tell the difference between a door and a window." Photo by: Raimund Koch
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the French country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
A polychrome facade made of salvaged, 100-year-old barnwood gives this small, lofted cottage space its unique character. Its copper roof is also reclaimed, a lucky Craigslist find from a local remodel. Though the structure has a footprint of just 11' x 14', it provides a useful space to entertain, catch up on work, or relax.
The 510 Cabin is one of Leggitt's designs, executed with the help of student apprentices.
Anka Lamprecht and Lukas Wezel shared their rustic domicile in a valley in Grotli, Norway. Boasting an enviable view, it’s the first cabin archived in the book’s “Backcountry” category that features homesteads in the wilderness.
The site needed a path that would let residents easily ascend from the bank to the house. The architects created one by simply replicating the way they had naturally walked up the site the first time they visited. The result is a meandering trail that directs visitors to the landscape’s different features — whether a majestic Arbutus tree, a private stone beach, or a wildflower clearing.
Livable sculpture at its finest. Created for the Zermatt Festival, an annual festival of chamber music, this structure (designed by a team of second-year architecture students!) maximizes the beauty of its surroundings with its 720-degree spiral composition. Valais, Switzerland. By Alice Studio/Atelier de la Conception de l’ Espace from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Wheelhaus Founder and CEO Jamie Mackay creates prefabs with the same quality and durability of the log cabins he grew up with, while incorporating his values of green production and modern design.
Sited on a lake near Bracebridge, Ontario, this small-footprint family cottage was designed by Toronto firm superkül to integrate with its natural surroundings and minimize its environmental impact. The clients, a married couple, had mixed feelings about going completely modern with their cabin's aesthetic, so the architects created a sculptural wood form to bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary. Photo by Shai Gil.
The cabins are transported to the site and craned onto their cradle bases.
Pre-fabrication helps ensure quality and ease of installation.
From their elevated position amongst the trees, these tiny cabin hideaways offer a unique perspective on the Cornish landscape.
A larch slatted skin covers the cabin that is elevated above the ground on turned pine poles.
The cabins are constructed from structural, insulated paged-pine panels with an EDPM rubber membrane covering.
The house’s materials are also influenced by Bavarian-alpine traditions — mainly larchwood in form of tongue-and-groove boards for the façade and as shingles on the roof.

Photo by Sebastian Schels
Good wood - Alpine living in style… introducing the delectable ‘Chalet Anzerre’ in Anzerre, Switzerland by Dutch architects SeARCH.
Lacroix Chessex Architectes realized La Maison aux Jeurs, a cabin in Les Jeurs, Switzerland situated on a rocky hill above the road. The structure is divided into two volumes that are angled 45 degrees apart with a connection on the mountain side. Both volumes are designed with different views of the valley below.
Context and Contrast in the Alps | Austria

An Austrian vacation home’s design references its mountainside setting and expansive views across the valley. By Tom Lechner / LP Architektur
Only local materials were used to build the chalet, including the larch wood cladding of the exterior, to reinforce the connection between indoors and outdoors.
Custom woodwork on the Pavillion by Cascade Built.
A ramp leads to into the living areas located in the upper volume.
A sheltered walkway  provides shade in summer, and admits the lower winter sun indoors to warm up the dark-dyed, glossy concrete floors.
The floating suites are scattered throughout the site.
After sunset the effect is reversed, and a radiating internal glow emerges from between the wooden slats.
Night views.
An exterior view.
The wood screens translate the elegant vertical movement of the reeds into a repetitive geometric pattern.
A view of the surrounding wraparound deck and wooden privacy screens.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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