142 Exterior Cabin Building Type Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

With the majority of the house's windows facing down the slope, not only does Bornstein maximize the views out, but he assured that his home would have loads of natural light pouring in, even if it only lasts for a few hours in winter.
The facade is punctured by a variety of differently sized windows: Those flush to the wall indicate the house’s public rooms, while the those for the private spaces are set back.
Blocked from the wind, a deck at the rear of the house is a favorite place for sunbathing and also shelters planters of herbs.
The master-bedroom addition juts forth like a prow of a ship.
In Washington’s Methow Valley, a modern cabin with an outdoor living room allows views of the surrounding woodland and meadow to perforate its volume.  
By day, the Chechaquo Lot 6 cabin gives the impression of floating in a forest clearing; by night, its windows glow against the wooded darkness. From all vantage points, the landscape permeates this 1,000-square-foot cabin, designed for two outdoor enthusiasts and tucked at the toe of a dramatic slope in Winthrop, Washington.
London-based practice De Rosee Sa’s self-built lakeside cabin recaptures the magic of childhood fairytales.  
A labor of love, the 377-square-foot Woodland Cabin is a design/build project completed over multiple trips to the lakeside lot in the village of Nouvelles in southern Belgium. The architects built the cabin using locally-sourced, storm-felled timber to deepen their understanding of materials and construction.  
By taking construction into their own hands and using locally-sourced materials, the team kept within the relatively tight budget of £25,000 ($32,872).   
Simple yet elegant, De Rosee Sa’s self-described
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
Most impressive of all, a solar array on the roof empowers the residents to produce more energy than they consume on-site.
Large floor-to-ceiling windows and doors provide abundant natural light and ventilation.
The designers have incorporated nature via a wall of greenery creating a cozy nook with a sense of privacy and a relaxed vibe.
Oke Hauser and Corinna Natter of MINI LIVING in the Urban Cabin.
Lake House
Jason and Suzanne Koxvold commissioned Studio Padron to design a 200-square-foot guesthouse on their Ellenville, New York, property. The geometric structure’s dark cedar cladding contrasts with the inviting interior, which is heated by a cast-iron Jøtul stove. A layer of built-in bookshelves made from felled oak lumber also helps insulate the building in winter.
Photo by Tom Bies
View from pond.
The house clearly displays its Sea Ranch–style touches.
Snow buries scrub oak trees in front of the home's west elevation.
The home's deck is perched over a canyon full of wildlife and rugged vegetation.
Warm cedar siding contrasts the snow capped ridge on a bright Utah winter day.
The iridescent exterior allows light to enter while maintaining a sense of privacy thanks to a wall of greenery.
On a scenic one-acre site in Inverness, California, Richardson Architects planted an artist studio in a hillside overlooking a coastal vista. The client, a painter who lives on the property, requested the addition be situated downhill from the main residence to create distance between work and home.
A celebration of nature in Norway, this rural hotel marries modern architecture with stunning natural landscapes. All of the hotel’s seven rooms, which are built into the landscape, are unique and offer either views of the valley, river, courtyard or a dramatic gorge.
A simple walkway leads to the unassuming entrance. "It's obscured, detailed like the cedar walls," Poss says. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.
Designed by architect Jeffery Poss, the tea hut is the first of what Kalanzis and her husband, Bill Cope, hope to be several sculptural structures on their property, which comprises a forested grove to the east, a former tree farm on the west, and the main house and hut in the middle. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half.
Rookie firm Patch Work Architecture used locally sourced Lawson cypress to clad the exterior of a 970-square-foot house in New Zealand. Vibrant painted accents contrast with the otherwise neutral structure. Steel trusses, painted in a blue hue called Lochmara from Resene, are visible through the fiberglass panels on the veranda. Photo by: Paul McCredie
The wooded site allowed for  soaring, curtainless windows that the couple couldn’t have enjoyed downtown.
The roll-up garage doors on the ocean-facing facade open onto a large deck. From the living room the deck appears to extend right out to the sea like a floating dock.
North Haven locals nonplussed by Bobbie Callahan and Ed Hayes’s unusual retreat lit upon its cinematic qualities, calling it “the Strand” after the nearest movie theater on the mainland.
An outdoor bathroom is tucked away, out of sight, in the garden. “The external fencing and outdoor shower were constructed using recycled materials from a collapsed shed near the site,” Simpson says.
Architect Andrew Simpson and the owners wanted to keep the design simple and grounded with “a sense of modest honesty.” In terms of the exterior, “as much of the existing cedar cladding as possible was retained and reused.”
A 1.4-kW solar array by Sharp and propane-powered in-floor radiant heating from Radiantec obviate any need to connect to municipal power.
The home’s reflection is seen in the lake at dusk. The white aluminum sleeves dramatically break through the timber, creating visual portals to the surrounding scenery.
When the shutters are closed, the house assumes an introverted character.
The shou sugi ban exterior siding stands as a bold contrast in the snow, and is
The residence is sited to maximize sunset views. The location, just outside of the historic district, allowed the homeowners to stay close to the heart of town while being able to build a contemporary house.
The eating and sleeping quarters have settled easily onto the shores of Shoal Lake.
Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.
2017 winner The Little House in Seabeck, Washington by MW Works  captures the essence of a cabin in the woods, despite its more generous size.
The concept of this Scandinavian getaway was simple: To create a cabin that is small and sparse yet spatially rich. The 55-quare-meter (592-square-foot) cabin, commissioned by a private client and completed in 2016, comprises a large living room, bedroom, ski room, and small annex with a utility room. It functions off the water and electricity grids.
Rocks that were unearthed while digging the foundation make up the hardscape in the rear, beyond the open porch. “It’s one of my favorite parts of the house,” says resident Laura Sohn. Sanders Pace Architecture finished the exterior in western red cedar treated with Sikkens Cetol.
Farm House, 2008. "Doing a small house is like doing a portrait of your client," says Jarmund. "In one case it’s an old abandoned farmhouse for a pair of historians. In another, it’s a guy who wants a house out of James Bond."
The Red House, 2002.
Debbi Gibbs loved the seeming wilderness of the area, especially considering its relative proximity to her New York apartment. She bought a ramshackle cabin with plans to tear it down and start fresh, then bided her time until she found just the right architects. Enter Joseph Tanney and Robert Luntz of Resolution: 4 Architecture, who granted her wish for an open prefabricated structure with custom design touches.
A prefabricated lakeside New Jersey retreat is one woman's outdoorsy counterpoint to city life.
Buser and Chapoton blackened the exterior cladding themselves.
Anna Hoover, founder of the non-profit First Light Alaska, sought a "thought refuge, a room with a view to sit and contemplate future projects and reflect on recent travels and interactions, plenty of ‘headspace’—tall ceilings—and the ability to host other artists for studio time," she says. A longtime resident of the Pacific Northwest, Hoover was familiar with the work of Olson Kundig and contacted the Seattle-based firm to design her abode.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

Get a Daily Dose of Design

Sign up for the Dwell Daily Newsletter and never miss our new features, photos, home tours, stories, and more.