442 Exterior Cabin Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The cabin is located in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, just a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík, and can only be accessed by car. The area is remote, private, and quiet, making it ideal for viewing the Northern Lights at night, as well as hiking during the day.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
A large pitched-top door, and a small pitched-top window are cut out from each of the four sides of the chalet’s exterior walls.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.
The chalet is built entirely out of Jura forest Fir wood planks.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
The structure is slightly elevated by four concrete piers to give optimal support, and the tiny house can be placed in even the most remote areas without the use of heavy machinery.
The A45 cabin can be customized and built in as little as four to six months.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
The exterior siding is in a traditional board and batten style, then accented with a steel roof and windows.
The couple wanted the cabin to mesh with its beautiful natural surroundings. "To us this meant small," says Kenny. "We wanted the design to put you right into the landscape, and by making it small we feel drawled by the night sky and mountains that surround us."
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
“The home is quite small, but designed in such a way that you don’t feel it,” Herrin says. Lift-slide openings by Quantum Windows & Doors, which were fabricated fewer than 50 miles from the house, make the main living space seem larger.
To evoke the feel of a tiny nature cabin, two massive sliding doors can be used to divide the common areas so that each section can be isolated from the rest of the house.
The eating and sleeping quarters have settled easily onto the shores of Shoal Lake.
At night, the quiet drama of the shed roof's angles glows against the darkened forest.
The roof overhang is painted white to bounce more light indoors.
A short set of stairs leads up to the glazed entrance of the Week’nder.
The three-bedroom home's gabled roof mimics the shape of a tent.
The Week’nder was constructed from two prefabricated modules.
The exterior is coated in Sherwin Williams Solid Wood stain.
"My dogma is inspired by a Japanese saying that an object gets its energy from three different elements: the material it is made out of, the person who made it, and the people who cared for it," says Mette. The cabins have been built of wood carried through the forest.
Nicknamed the Floating Farmhouse, this 200-year-old home inspired one former copywriter to delve into architecture as a living. Inside, renovator and owner Tom Givone mixes vintage and industrial decor. Photo by Mark Mahaney.
Blocked from the wind, a deck at the rear of the house is a favorite place for sunbathing and also shelters planters of herbs.
A modern forest dwelling in the village of Muraste in Estonia.
The larch wood cladding helps the cabins blend in with their forest site.
The pyramidal roofs of the cabins allow snow to slide down to the ground.
The three cabins have north-facing windows that frame views of the Baltic Sea.
KUU arhitektid who designed this retreat says they were inspired by traditional Estonian "koda" huts.
The living areas have north and south facing glass walls.
All outposts are a two-hour drive (or less) from its respective city, without traffic.
Each campsite comprises multiple cabins that are spaced far enough part to preserve privacy.
Carl Turner and Mary Martin pose on the porch of the Stealth Barn, a multipurpose structure that plays as a guest cottage, office space, and escape from whatever may be cooking at Ochre Barn.
The Red House, 2002.
Erecting a modern cabin where a tool shed once stood became a family exercise for architect Jim Cutler and his daughter, Hannah, who worked with him on the design and build.
Each Getaway cabin has a hot shower with bath products, and electric toilet, mini-kitchen, hearing, and either one or two queen beds with, fresh linens, and pillows.
Suzanne and Brooks Kelley at the back of their 1,100-square-foot guest cottage.
In September 2009, Bill and Daniel Yudchitz bought a 2.78-acre lot that had water access to Lake Superior’s Chequamegon Bay. Many of the properties they looked at required a larger minimum building footprint than they desired; their cabin needed to be small to reduce its environmental impact.
Lightweight corrugated zinc roof sheeting clads the exterior.
David Ferguson of Kimo Estate took construction into his own hands in a two-person owner-builder team.
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The glazed door and other openings allow guests to enjoy sunset views from bed.
The A-frame structure is elevated on pad footings.
Stargazing is easy thanks to the lack of light pollution.
JR's Hut is an off-grid glamping destination near Gundagai, NSW.
The concept of this Scandinavian getaway was simple: To create a cabin that is small and sparse yet spatially rich. The 55-quare-meter (592-square-foot) cabin, commissioned by a private client and completed in 2016, comprises a large living room, bedroom, ski room, and small annex with a utility room. It functions off the water and electricity grids.
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half.
Jason and Suzanne Koxvold commissioned Studio Padron to design a 200-square-foot guesthouse on their Ellenville, New York, property. The geometric structure’s dark cedar cladding contrasts with the inviting interior, which is heated by a cast-iron Jøtul stove. A layer of built-in bookshelves made from felled oak lumber also helps insulate the building in winter.
Lake House
The pinwheel plan also led to the creation of two sheltered outdoor spaces: the morning porch and the evening porch.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.