167 Exterior Cabin Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
Clear Rock Lookout seen at dusk.
The two, season-specific wings of the L-shaped plan are separated by a covered breezeway.
Lemmo Architecture and Design received a 2017 AIA Austin award for the Clear Rock Lookout, one of their first commissions.
A low-impact design approach informed the compact, elevated footprint and grated metal walkways. Rainwater is channeled from the roof (covered in local stone) into a rain barrel.
"The modern form contrasts with the Hill Country vernacular used on the rest of the 1,000-acre West Texas ranch," notes the firm.
In contrast to the glazed writer's studio, the hunting blind is punctuated by two thin windows.
The weathering steel exterior pays homage to the owner’s youth, which was spent welding oil tanks.
Fronted with full-height, double-glazed openings, the studio frames east-facing views of the creek-bed and beyond.
A look at the exterior of the cabin.
The exterior is clad in fiber-cement panels and topped with a bitumen roof.
The Etno Hut is elevated on a steel foundation screwed into the ground by hand. The space beneath the main volume was covered to hide cables, piping, and storage.
Set on a slope, the property faces the forest to the north and sweeping views of the landscape to the south.
The upper volume extends over a small patio.
Site placement was a lengthy process as the architects searched to optimize seclusion and spectacular views. Specialists, including ecologist Mark Wapstra, were brought on board to survey the site and ensure minimal landscape impact.
The CABN model is also available for purchase, and can be installed on your own remote site.
The dwelling is fully immersed in nature, surrounded by scenic vistas and greenery.
Some pavilions overlook the water, while others are nestled further into the coastal bushland.
The exterior Red Ironbark cladding was charred—using the Shou Sugi Ban technique—to increase the longevity of the timber and as a nod to the significance of fire.
Large sliding glass doors connect the interior spaces to the outdoor elements.
The simple black box is broken by operable glazing, drawing the outdoor elements in.
Mill Valley Cabins
forrest view
A slatted wood canopy extends from one side of the cabin, providing an increased amount of filtered light.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
“The factory-built modules were carefully transported up winding roads and set in place without harming a single tree,” adds the firm.
Each cabin was assembled from single, mostly completed modules craned into place and raised atop concrete piers. The cabins include a bedroom and bathroom, a study desk, a  covered porch and a fire pit.
The entry is marked by a thin, cantilevered canopy hovering over the front porch.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
All outposts are a two-hour drive (or less) from its respective city, without traffic.
Each campsite comprises multiple cabins that are spaced far enough part to preserve privacy.
The front deck, invisible from the road, is an extension of the wood paneling in the main living space.
The Red House, 2002.
Each Getaway cabin has a hot shower with bath products, and electric toilet, mini-kitchen, hearing, and either one or two queen beds with, fresh linens, and pillows.
Here's the cover image in all its glory. Van der Rohe's Farnsworth House is the essential glass house (sorry Philip J) and looks pretty spectacular in the snow. One wonders if those windows are double-paned though. Photo by Jason Schmidt.
Cho’s recently completed vacation retreat, the Concrete Box House, was inspired by the use of raw materials. Cho decided on grape vines as an unusual landscape element.
The pinwheel plan also led to the creation of two sheltered outdoor spaces: the morning porch and the evening porch.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
Pascal and Richie have worked hard to learn the lay of the land around their new house, and to become stewards of their small wetland area, with help from local high school kids.
Torontonians Dan and Diane Molenaar head north to Drag Lake when they need a weekend away from urban life—though they brought some of the city with them. The mirrored windows that circle the cottage were recycled from two office towers in Toronto.
House O, designed by Jun Igarashi, forgoes hallways and interior doors in favor of casually interconnected rooms.
The prefab cabin is an arresting sight at night.
The three-bedroom, two-bathroom cabin has a communal space with a custom Baltic Birch bookshelf, and a bench by the window where the owners can look out to the surrounding wilderness, and fern meadow.
The goal was to be able to squeeze a full bathroom, kitchen, living room, storage, as well as a sleeping space that would accommodate a king-sized bed into the cabin's original tiny footprint.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.