8215 Home Design Ideas and Photos

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.

A bookshelf by Muller Van Severen.
An installation by d’Hanis & Lachaert.
An installation by Willem Cole hangs in the gallery, which leads to an open stairway to the office and private bedrooms upstairs.
The room also contains a sofa by Flexform, cushions from textile firm Chevalier Masson, a Jens Fager candelabra, and a painting by Roger Raveel.
The main rooms include an art nook.
Images by Raw Color hang in a room upstairs.
With the help of architect Bart Lens, Veerle Wenes and Bob Christiaens merged a 19th-century building with a 1970s one to create a combined home and art gallery in Antwerp. In the dining room downstairs, Wenes entertains family, friends, and gallery visitors. The yellow chair is by Jens Fager.
Wenes incorporated artful furnishings into the private spaces: In the living room, a leather chair by Maarten Van Severen is beneath a lamp by his son, Hannes Van Severen, of design duo Muller Van Severen.
The architects wrapped the glazing around the corner of the living room to bring the landscape inside. The open-web trusses run continuously from indoors to out. A fleet of Modernica furnishings complement a Prototype Boomerang chair by Richard Neutra, a custom Moufelt industrial felt rug, and Circa50 butterfly chairs.
The front facade, covered in Minerit HD fiber cement panels, is muted save for a bright-green entrance ramp and red door. The entire project came in at about $225 per square foot.
Bohlin Cywinski Jackson’s design for the Verheyden clan is instantly legible from the back deck, where the repetition of trusses, windows, and lumber creates a strong linear profile.
An Eero Saarinen Womb chair and ottoman, an Isamu Noguchi Akari lamp, and forest views make for a cozy reading nook.
Anthony Belluschi, the son of architect Pietro Belluschi (1899-1994), refurbished his father’s 1938 Sutor House with the help of general contractor Pat Kirkhuff. A top priority for the new owners, Aric Wood and Erin Graham, was to unearth the neglected gardens, which were inspired by Jiro Harada, an authority on Japanese landscaping.
The dining room features a custom pendant by Aqua Creations above an Oregon black walnut table. Shoji doors made by Eric Franklin lead to the kitchen and hide a wet bar.
In the hearth, more zebrawood paneling is accented by LED strips.
Around the corner from the foyer, there’s a set of Epos Elan 10 speakers in cherry cabinets.
With the aid of landscaper Takashi Fukuda and the home’s original plans, the residents are gradually reclaiming the multileveled site.  The 2,300-square-foot home’s overhangs shelter its porches (opposite, far right).
A strolling garden and a pond with a waterfall have already been brought back
Contractor Patrick O’Neil repaired the woven Douglas fir ceiling in the foyer.
The 2,300-square-foot home’s overhangs shelter its porches.
A Japanese-style Bamboo water fountain sits in the driveway.
The portico is used as a living room in Spring and Summer.
The front porch, clad with floor-to-ceiling glass windows, illuminates the foyer inside.
Uncovered paths lead straight down into the forest.
A curved zebrawood wall greets visitors in the foyer.
The gated mid-century estate combines stately scale with original features and era-sensitive updates, making it a Los Angeles mid-century marvel.
The family shares an alfresco lunch with Ikimau Ikimau, a friendly neighbor who helped build the house. The aluminum weatherboard cladding was custom-designed by O’Sullivan.
In the kids’ room, Seamus climbs the bunk beds he shares with his siblings.
Four-year-old Seamus relaxes in the living room, whose plywood walls 

are covered with family photographs.
Outside on the deck, one-year-old Mary and three-year-old Finbar enjoy a snack at the kid-size table and chairs Michael designed and made for them.
Melissa Schollum stands at the brass island bench in the kitchen. O’Sullivan, who designed and built the house, spent many hours creating the wooden joinery (including the tall, slender windows and their timber shutters) and the intricate ceiling. The cupboards under the marble bench in the kitchen are made of glass to allow more light into the space. The dining table and chairs were designed by Sam Haughton of IMO.
the reflectivity of the brass kitchen island makes it seem to dematerialize.
In the suburb on the mountain’s lower slopes, Michael O’Sullivan and his sons Seamus and Finbar exchange motorcycle tips outside the compact, innovative home O’Sullivan designed.
White walls, a luxurious marble double-sink, and an area rug give this bathroom an inviting atmosphere. “The natural light, open spaces, and light color palette make it a great place to wake up in the morning,” Flournoy says of his home. The sink is from Restoration Hardware and the rug is from West Elm.
Stair to third floor family room
Small punched window brings morning light into second and third floors along stairwell
Family room at third level.  Laundry concealed behind panels at left
Rear portico framing rear access to house
Detail at bedside with window nook
New addition at rear of house framing the original house and interior areas
Kitchen and dining area from point of entry with coffee and drink service beyond
Living room opening out onto rear garden
Dining area and kitchen beyond.  Service pods on the left create distinction between areas along the open plan
Kitchen with custom floating tiled hood vent
Powder room with borrowed light from glass ceiling over hung wall sink

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