18790 Home Design Ideas and Photos

The operable windows can be opened to let in cooling cross breezes.
The exterior is cladded with tun timber, a wood that is native to the region.
The band of glazing separates the timber cladding from the stone base.
A sloped, double-glazed skylight floods the interior with natural light and provides stargazing opportunities at night.
Dunbar and Astrakhan's low-cost, high-impact tour de force is a storefront facade constructed from salvaged double-insulated window glass panels arranged in a shingle pattern.
The spa-like wet room.
A spa-like master bath even has a relaxing wet room.
The master bath suite.
A spiral staircase leads to the lower level.
The wraparound deck enhances the homes' indoor/outdoor lifestyle.
The barbeque area sits just off the kitchen and features built-in seating.
The great room offers direct access to the wide veranda and extensive use of wood combined with the ample glazing brings the outdoors in.
Large for a tiny house RV, but still small - especially in the western landscape.
The bar-top is wrapped in gorgeous pine siding.
The master loft fits a king bed, and features an egress window and two awnings.
The kitchen and living areas are integrated together inside the large main room, yet each can still function as its own autonomous zone.
Ample natural light enters via the multiple windows. As you can see above, stylish cabin vibes flood the home.
The tall ladder lives secured against the wall, but can be attached to either the guest loft or storage soffit, providing access to either.
This built-in custom couch offers ample storage underneath.
With a sleek, contemporary profile, the Drake is equally comfortable in rugged terrain or a more refined setting. Here is a look at the ladder accessing the storage soffit. The bathroom window extends your sight-line through the space and outward.
Aside from its stunning look, what makes the Drake unique is the thoughtful expertise that has gone into its design. Crafted by Land Ark RV's founders Brian and Joni Buzarde, who have been living the mobile tiny house lifestyle since 2011, this travel trailer has been years in the making.
"Psychology and emotional response play big roles when you're living in such a relatively small space, so subtle moves can have a large impact." Whether one is looking for a weekend retreat or a mobile home equipped for an extended sojourn, the two founders have spent years researching and testing so that this model can be the ideal solution for all.
Photos taken on an ancient ocean bed.
While the space is heavily insulated, with strong solar gain, a cast-iron stove from Salamander Stoves provides extra warmth on cool days.
Beth draws at the desk in the cabin.
Durable Iroko timber—which when weathered, will match the color tone of the surrounding buildings—has been chosen as cladding for the internal courtyard elevations.
A zinc-cladding system has been incorporated above the north-facing wall as a reference to the agricultural buildings in the local area.
 An entrance hall, gallery, and double-height staircase connect the two wings, which frame views of the serene garden.
A glimpse at the Timber shutters from The New England Shutter Company.
The south-facing master bedroom on the first floor has a terrace that opens to views of the countryside beyond the garden.
The sofa in the living room is also by IKEA.
A look at the dining table by Habitat and colorful IKEA dining chairs.
The ground floor consists of two zones—a northern wing where the open-plan kitchen, dining room, and living area are located, as well as a western wing, which houses the four bedrooms.
A solid brick enclosure has been used for the external north-facing wall.
"The building is arranged on a 9.8-foot structural grid, which is expressed both internally and externally to give clarity and order to the composition," says Chapman from OB Architecture.
The simple building materials —brick, timber, off-white render, glass, and zinc— and the elevation of the house take its cue from Manor Court.
The design was a response to the homeowner’s request for a bright, modern, and sustainable, four-bedroom home. The clients wanted open-plan living areas, a direct relationship to the garden, and thresholds that blur the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
The two-story house is positioned adjacent to the massing of Manor Court so that the profile of its roof edge on the first and second floors align with the eaves and ridge of the property.
Mural, Mural on the Wall

The home already has a vivid color scheme, but to energize certain areas further, Bestor and Grunbaum added murals to some of the walls. Aside from the vinyl decals in the bathrooms, the stairwell is painted to evoke Grunbaum’s family home in the 1970s. Designer Mina Javid created a faux headboard for the master bedroom. minajavid.com
Furnished with Rakks shelving, a Blu Dot table, and a sofa bed from ABC Carpet & Home, the floor also includes a spacious guest bedroom. A bright-yellow color accent, painted onto the wall in Benjamin Moore’s Sunburst, acts as a subtle, minimalist headboard.
Toby Barlow and Keira Alexandra enjoy a leisurely Alpine morning in bed in their Detroit high-rise home.
Jasperware Headboard designed by Eddie Ross

With a nod to 1700s designer Josiah Wedgwood’s jasperware pottery, this headboard is constructed with various moldings and a door. “It’s literal but he made it much larger and grander,” says Azzarito of the striking and unusual headboard. Fun fact: Josiah Wedgwood’s daughter was married to Charles Darwin.
"Seeing our daughter grow up in such a special place brings us a lot of joy. She’s able to explore the world around her and discover a sense of wonder and freedom for herself," says Fishbeyn.
A look at the Italian ceramic kitchen countertops.
Hafele hardware has been used for most of the maple plywood cabinetry.
Thanks to the cleverly designed layout, they can witness the changes of seasons from anywhere in their home.
The hand-forged, carbon-steel pans are from Blanc Creatives.
Fishbeyn and Wright love that their home is set in a natural landscape with an incredible mountain view.
You don't need a full greenhouse to successfully grow herbs, just a dedicated spot that will get at least six hours of sun a day. In fact, your indoor herb garden can be as simple as a row of potted plants.
The concrete soffits were left unplastered, and the fly ash walls were finished with just a coat of paint to create an atmosphere of rustic simplicity.
In the chalet room, the bed, table, and seating were designed as a island unit finished in smooth cement render.
The glazing faces the lake, providing privacy from the road.
The open attic creates an airy sense of space for the lower levels, and offers more room for storage.
Stairs to the upper level.
The upper level conceals the bedroom.
At the other end of the home on the same level, a stove creates a cozy corner, while steps add another layer to the space.
Full-height windows wrap around the home, giving jaw-dropping panoramic views of the lake.
A view of the kitchen from the living room. The reading nook/bench is another layer of space.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.