619 Doors Design Photos And Ideas

The front entrance's unfinished look was an intentional decision made during construction and explores the concept of "finishing" a home that will certainly continue to evolve.
The rear exterior was also transformed—it now has a designated outdoor kitchen, dining terrace, and lounge area. Folding doors connect the breakfast room to the new exterior spaces for easy flow between.
On the first site visit, Rausch was relieved to see that despite a disastrous ’60s remodel, some original details, like the stained-glass windows, had persevered.
Geometric recessed door handles adorn solid oak pocket doors.
A side door in the music room opens up to an adjacent volume that houses the new, brick-floored guest suite on the ground level.
A wall of windows floods the music room with northern light.
Steel sunshades protect the interiors from unwanted solar gain in the summer.
A wood pergola offers coverage while allowing light to filter inside.
The sunken courtyard at the base of the atrium.
Dyer allocated the entry to the niche, saving and reinstalling the woodwork. It frames a beckoning view of the kitchen, as well as the striking new windows over the sink.
The recent remodel and expansion of this North Vancouver split-level preserved much of the front facade. New paint, new window units, and a punchy yellow door go a long way toward updating the old without making any drastic structural changes to the front elevation.
A large slider opens onto a small courtyard and the outdoors. The lounge chairs and ottoman are by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller and the Rivet side table is from Frama.
In Yuen Long, Hong Kong, a 452-square foot residence is designed to accommodate a young couple, one of their mothers, and their pets: a cat and a parrot. The home features transforming furniture and nooks and crannies that are perfect for the pets. A bench by the door doubles as a litter box.
An interior window conveys natural light into the hallway from an exterior window in the bedroom. Curving walls allow the relatively small space to live larger. The custom door pull is fashioned from walnut.
The height of oversized doors can be offset or accentuated with long hardware.
An elongated escutcheon, long handle pull, and thumb-operated latch give this exterior handleset a striking, modern style.
A brass doorknob paired with a mortice lock is a quintessential vintage look.
Door hardware is a small design detail, but as with all decor choices, a wise one can effortlessly elevate the overall aesthetic. From hardware style to finish and form, that doorknob you put your hands on every day can really make a statement.
The 2020 Living Vehicle’s new folding stair system is rated for several hundred pounds and comes with adjustable legs.
A unique door that swivels from the top was designed to prevent heat escape.
A new transom window over the doorway brings much-needed light into the hallway, and the doors pocket into the walls for unimpeded flow, which is even more crucial in a small space. "[They] help the flat feel more sleek and less cluttered," says Astrain. The new doors also comply with building regulations—there needed to be a fire door between the kitchen and hallway.
In the front of the home, original Edwardian details remain—including the stained glass doors and window. The large front yard remains as a play area for the children.
"We moved the column supporting that whole roof," says Wittman. "It looks simple, but it was a lot of work." Now, two large, aluminum multi-slide doors from LaCantina open up the entire corner.
The subtle front door blends seamlessly into the staircase. It leads to the first story, where the client’s elderly parents stay so that they don’t have to walk up many flights of steps.
The design team widened the door to the backyard.
There is now a defined entry space inside the front door.
Inside, white siding echoes the exterior of the home.
Rossi installed a new front door with amber bottle glass, the latter salvaged from the firm’s Guthrie House project in Palm Springs.
“Some people struggle with the color of the bricks. It does stand out, but in a good way. If you’re going to do something different, there’s no point compromising,” says Michelle.
The screened-in porch leads into an open great one on one half of the structure.
Doors made from FSC-certified wood and custom pivoting windows appear throughout the house, including in the garage (as pictured).
At the entryway, two massive panes of frosted glass shimmer with light and shadow from the atrium inside.
From the bedrooms to the common areas, each room flows into the next without a traditional hierarchy. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The bedroom furniture is by MOS, and the bedding is by Pendleton.</span>
The exterior is clad in Galvalume siding, a workaday, weather-resistant material that gives the facade a shimmer that varies depending on the light.
The home spreads out from a courtyard garden in a shape that resembles a hand traced on a sheet of paper. The structure of each “finger” nods to the traditional gable-sided barns that dot the area.
The exterior walls are made almost entirely of seven-foot-square sliders. The Windows and sliding glass doors are by Arcadia.
The gradient of dark to light green mimics the tones of the greenery around the pavilion.
The renovation was completed on a tight budget, made possible by the use of low-cost and recycled materials throughout the interior. The steel structure supporting the mezzanine is left exposed, creating a graphic feature.
The new mezzanine is supported by six exposed steel frames that stabilize and distribute the weight. This approach negated the need for structural columns in the open floor space.
Brick continues from the interior of the home to the exterior, emphasizing indoor/outdoor living. Some of the bricks were salvaged from demolition— but to get the quantity required for overall development, the couple worked closely with London Reclaimed Brick Merchants.
“The sliding doors add to the ground-floor layout, especially in the summer where you can open up the whole space into the garden and the studio. It works so well, and makes us want to stay in London for most of the summer months.”
“We couldn't resist this beautiful shade of pink,” notes Richard of the door color. “It was championed by Kristina, but I didn’t take much convincing. It would also draw a lot of attention and help the house to be easily found by visiting clients and potential new business.”
A sliding door connects the master bedroom to the backyard, where an alfresco outdoor entertaining area and outdoor shower are located.
For a playful touch, the front door features a MadeMeasure Stacked door handle.
The design team took down interior walls and replaced the floors with dark plank vinyl.
Bedrooms bookend the living space in the middle.
Large openings directly connect the interior living spaces with the garden. A thin metal canopy includes a special detail on which items can hang.
The alley entrance is shaded by a cantilevered volume on the second floor. Turf-block pavers reduce runoff.
The sliding doors in the master bedroom open up to the garden and terrace.
After: Now, vertical strips of wood from American tulip trees accentuate the height of the entry wall and surrounds the new backyard access, with glass that mimics the window shapes on either side. The ropes are in place to ring the bell in the tower.
Homeowner Simon Doonan stands next to the front door. "We have flamboyance, and we’re not inhibited about anything. [Architect] Gray Organschi gave [the house] that intellectual rigor needed to make it beautiful. We were well matched."
Originally built in 1977, and remodeled in 2000 by Seattle-based architect Tom Kundig, this expansive home is located in The Highlands, a cooperative community in Shoreline, Washington. The home's spacious interiors connect to the outdoors with immense pivot doors, and floor-to-ceiling windows frame views of the surrounding forest. Much of the home—including the soaring library-like bookshelves—is constructed of mahogany sourced from Benaroya Hall—the home of the Seattle Symphony. The property also includes a finished basement, a heated pool, and fruit trees.
Architect Javier Senosiain created this remarkable home on a hilly site near Mexico City. “The green dune wraps itself around the inside spaces almost completely, rendering it almost invisible. From the outside, all one sees are grass, bushes, trees, and flowers,” he says.
A beautiful wooden door offers a stately welcome. The polished canopy of redwood lines a bayed seating area above.
A raised planter adds character and defines the entryway, while still allowing for connection between the front door and living room. “You want the space to breathe, but you also want to designate zones,” says Wei.
"It was rundown, dark, and divided," recalls Masaaki of his first impression of the warehouse, the ground floor of a multistory apartment building. But after some thought, Masaaki, a Japanese-born architect, and Esther, an artist from Minorca, realized that owning the combined 2,700 square feet would allow them to headquarter Mas-aqui, the architecture and design firm they were planning to start, on-site. They bought the property and within months transformed it into a bright, modern live/work space.

Modern doors are all about first impressions, whether it's installed on the exterior or interior. Endlessly customizable, crafted out of metal or wood, they have the power to reconfigure any space. Ideas for modern folding, sliding, and swing doors abound in our collection.