18790 Home Design Ideas and Photos

The kitchen is layered with the living room—the counter space becomes the flooring in the living area, and steps are used as additional seating.
Inside, the open-plan layout features a kitchen which morphs into the living area with a raised built-in bench/reading nook, along with an upper level that overlooks the space.
 The indoor portion is set behind sliding glass doors and can be used for storing firewood.
Partially enclosed, the exterior platform features an outdoor swing that is suspended from the timber-framed porch.
The first-floor cantilevers out and is perched like a platform, serving as a great viewpoint for observing the surrounding forest scenery.
Rather than create a typical two-story home, the architects have designed a multi-layered space with a series of platforms.
Glass panels brighten up and modernize the interiors.
The living and dining rooms were updated.
Some of the Japanese-style rooms were retained and restored.
The architects installed modern, floating stairs with a wooden tread and steel railings.
Elements from traditional Japanese architecture such as warm wood, exposed beams, and shoji screen-style sliding doors characterize the home.
A study area on the second level looks down to the first level.
Glass takes the place of paper in the shoji screen-style doors that close and open to separate and connect the different functional zones.
Mizumoto transformed one of the original Japanese-style rooms into a garden that references the house’s past as a rice field farmhouse.
The firm’s founder and principal architect Sumiou Mizumoto stripped away the house’s side extension.
This 7,072-square-feet, two-story house consists of 80 tsubos, which were re-organized to accommodate modern living.
In traditional Japanese architecture, spaces are divided into "tsubos," a Japanese unit of floor area that’s the equivalent to approximately 35.58 square feet.
Staying true to the aesthetics of traditional, Japanese rural homes, architect Sumiou Mizumoto stuck with simple color and material choices. White and wood elements dominate pure, streamlined spaces.
This classic Japanese room would receive a thoughtful renovation.
The facade of the house in Ritto maintains traditional elements.
The shack is decorated with found and secondhand treasures from around the world. If the couple couldn’t find an item secondhand, they decided to make it themselves.
Jamie and Ingrid stained the timber facade a dark blackish-brown to blend the shack into the landscape, but kept the window frames white for a stark pop of contrast.
The second bedroom, located on a lower level, includes a handmade queen bed nestled between walls that have been built from original sandstone and lined with timber.
Two French doors open up the open-plan kitchen and dining area to a covered outdoor terrace overlooking the water.
In the main bedroom, the couple have built the king-size bed frame out of recycled timber.
Sea breezes keep The Little Black Shack cool in summer, while a hand-built sandstone fireplace warms the property in winter.
The shack is only accessible via two ways: taking a boat across Pittwater Bay or hiking through the Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park.
With a wall mount kit and select blocks, the pieces can be attached to the wall.
"We started by asking ourselves if it might be possible to design recreational cat furniture to fit well to architectural modernism or art museums," Neko writes on their website. The company is based in Japan and produces a limited run of 22 cat trees a year, fabricated from Japanese hardwood by craftspeople in Hida.
The rooftop, made of polyester and reinforced fiberglass, retracts to bring the sky indoors.
Large acrylic windows provide expansive views of the outdoors.
The stainless steel ladder doubles as a helpful staircase for entering the chassis on land, as well as a railing in water.
The Sealander motor reaches speeds of up to 5.6mph on water for comfortable cruising.
Each Sealander can be customized to the user's preference, from add-on speakers to an on-board shower and toilet.
The optional cooking module comes with a single-flame spirit cooker station, while the wash module is equipped with a stainless steel sink, glass cover plate, tap with water pump, as well as a 13-liter fresh-water tank and 16-liter tank for waste water.
Developed by Daniel Straub, the Sealander combines the German entrepreneur’s love of the outdoors with his background in industrial design.
The downstairs garden space offers another outdoor escape.
Next to the steel-and-wood staircase, which leads to the roof, a patch of glass flooring lets sunlight filter down to the bedrooms.
The guest room features a bed from West Elm.
The residents furnished the interior themselves, even hand-picking the exposed reclaimed beams from a barn in Pennsylvania. The dining table and shelving unit are 1970s vintage and the sofa is from Design Within Reach (left). The height of the top level varies from around nine to 12 feet.
Architect Allison Reeves was renovating a townhome in Red Hook when she discovered that the existing redbrick facade was falling apart. With contractor John Fasano, she put in a new exterior of dark bricks, punctuated by a slanted pane of glass by Bieber Windows. A new roof supports a deck as well as the home's mechanicals, which the residents opted to move out of harm's way after Hurricane Sandy flooded other homes in the area.
Stylish and functional pieces which help seamlessly integrate your office into your home.
The addition now forms a comfortable and fully functional new social heart for the home.
The unique floor treatment included a two-pour concrete slab method, allowing for insulation to be placed between the two slabs—making the space highly thermally efficient.
Energy efficient glazing and sustainable timber selections have also been used throughout the project.
The family's favorite Kandinsky (shown above) served as inspiration for the interiors.
The clients were looking to create a calm and comfortable space to retreat within, with moments of privacy and seclusion within the open plan.
The strategy was to arrange the spaces in and around three sculptural masonry walls, creating nooks and reveals within the open plan of the addition. With spaces that could offer a place to sit and engage with family, or to withdraw and read a book by the garden window.
The architects created a new entrance for the home which leads directly into the new addition.
The architects were looking to create a space that would reflect the client’s eclectic and playful sensibility, while also establishing a connection between the new living spaces and lush garden.
Although the house is perched on a high ridge, it sits modestly within the spectacular scenery.
One of the bedrooms.
The view is framed from every angle.
The open kitchen blends in with sleek, wood cabinetry and black countertops.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
The minimalist material palette is picked up on the interiors as well, where a black concrete fireplace plays off the polished aggregate concrete floors.
The living room opens to the courtyard.
The deck is covered with an extended cedar canopy.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.