22083 Home Design Ideas and Photos

In some parts of the ancient city, the streets run above these subterranean cave homes.
The homeowners wanted a space to accommodate their interests: gardening, looking after their ducks, or relaxing in the shade provided by the canopy of trees on the property.
The dwelling is fully immersed in nature, surrounded by scenic vistas and greenery.
Atop the kitchen and bathroom lies an additional sleeping quarter, directly under the sky above.
Bath time is never dull for the couple’s two young children, thanks to bright orange Interni tiles by Domus.
While the house’s original pine is richly colored and textured, a number of structural posts rendered the kitchen difficult to furnish with modern fixtures. A newly-added black beam, which extends outward into the dining room, allowed for the posts’ removal.
The rear garden looks into the kitchen and dining space right through the internal courtyard and beyond.
The Felds’ new kitchen is clean, modern, and laced with industrial touches (laboratory faucets, lab glass pendant lamps designed by Sand, stainless steel appliances) while animated by materials and crafted elements that radiate warmth: fir floors unearthed from beneath two layers of linoleum; a fireclay farm sink made in England; Carrera marble counters that extend up the walls; walnut shelving; and industrial mechanisms that put the hardware on display, such as the suspended rolling blackboard that conceals the water heater.
This project sparks a conversation about the future of the relationship between urban development and the preservation of natural areas.
Handmade leather Fernando chairs by Jayson Home surround a live-edge custom walnut table by Ben Riddering in the dining area.
The child's room has a bunk bed and study area.
The light, clean profile of the vanity gives the bathroom a sense of spaciousness and modernity.
A volume containing a bathroom and cloakroom was built within the master bedroom.
In the master bedroom, the sloping ceiling of the original structure was kept intact.
The staircase weaves upwards and around the interior sunlit patio on the first floor, so the functional zones extend vertically around the core source of natural light.
On the second floor, a door and storage spaces are hidden away behind a wall to give the space a clean, streamlined look.
"Following natural daylight, going up along the steel staircase, we can see modified skylights, vertical lighting windows, and a pure outdoor space," says Liu. "This is the area we modified most. The whole building starts from light and vertical space."
A sheltered area with a circular cut out on one side of the roof serves as an outdoor relaxation area for the adults, and a play area for their child.
The new first floor is a semi-open area where the boundaries between the interiors and the outdoors dissolve.
A sunlit, open-plan living room, dining room, and kitchen are located on the first level.
Perforations in the steel tread of the staircase allow light from the skylight above to filter all the way down to the lower levels.
The project’s chief designer Liu Kai and his team reconstructed the first floor to better connect it with its formerly isolated interior courtyard.
A modular furniture wall, which the RIGI team refers to as a "life board," was used as a flexible system that accommodates various storage and shelving configurations.
RIGI Design reshaped the form and functionality of the interior layout.
The team reinforced the building’s framework, and unified the height of the entire building.
The original staircase in the northern section was demolished, and a new staircase with a skylight was built in the center of the house.
The old building was not structurally sound, so sections of it needed to be repaired.
Because of its narrow site and messy interior layout, the original apartment was dark and cramped.
A look inside the cozy bedroom lined in wood veneer. A recessed skylight-inspired lighting feature helps keep the space from feeling too snug.
The second staircase is skinnier and sandwiched between the bed and window.
The bed is flanked by two staircases, one of which is hidden behind a white curtain. Hidden storage is integrated into the stair design.
The 10 Degrees House is located on Kangping Road in Shanghai's Xuhui district. The current tenant is an Apple employee.
The bedroom box is surrounded by hidden storage, from the white closet (seen behind the red dog) to built-in drawers. The wooden surface behind the yellow chair can be extended out to create a dining tabletop.
The upper level of the home features a large family room, two guest suites, and a master wing that faces the pond and ocean.
The entertainment box includes built-in shelving and a television mount.
Feng Shui principles have informed the placement of the mirrored surfaces. In the living room, the mirrored panel has been placed so that the tenant can't see himself in the mirror when sitting on the sofa.
A triangular addition with a light box was inserted behind the sofa to align the living space with the angled TV wall.
The living area has been carved out from the space between the yellow kitchen box and the wood-paneled entertainment box.
A large window at the end of the living space lets in ample natural light.
The existing concrete pillars have been left intact and provide an interesting contrast of texture to the renovation's new smooth, glossy surfaces.
Space is maximized in the kitchen thanks to the functional boxes; the fridge and additional storage are built into the bathroom volume on the left.
The centrally located kitchen volume is faced with high-gloss lacquered panels and features a yellow tile backsplash with black artificial stone countertops.
Carstensen painted the body and exterior trim on the garage the same color, in order to "make the house look slightly more modern, without losing character," he said. The color is a discontinued shade, called Evening Canyon, from Behr, that he had mixed at Home Depot.  "I tried so many before landing on this one," he said. "This one ended up being my favorite, because it maintains a nice warm tone all throughout the day. Others would end up either looking too cool (almost navy blue) in direct sunlight, or just look brown."
A view of the new screened porch from the driveway. The light is the Factory Modern No. 6 Outdoor Sconce from Schoolhouse Electric.
The updated deck got a new eating area.
Carstensen updated the deck, replacing the vertical posts with screen to create a more open feeling.
The screened porch is just a few steps from the back door and deck, making for easy circulation between the different areas.
The new dividing wall was sheathed in sanded pine plywood and includes a door for easy access to the other side of the garage.
Carstensen purchased the vintage Malm fireplace in Los Angeles on a work trip and had it shipped to Portland. He's hoping to install it in time for the fall season. The interior of the porch is outfitted with a mix of furnishings, both vintage and new. The rug, shelf unit, and loveseat are all from the locally-based Schoolhouse Electric, as are the ceiling lights: Factory Light No. 7 in Green.
Carstensen landscaped the backyard and added a simple firepit circle with chairs. This seating area merges easily with the new screened porch.
The compact, 54-square-foot kitchen is equipped with an induction cooktop (no gas used). The countertops are Create Stone's White Quartz made with 72-percent post-industrial waste.
Double-glazed windows open the home up to the permaculture garden outside and northern sunlight. The kitchen is visible from nearly every room in the home.
Refurbished vintage copper pendant lights hang above the kitchen’s handmade Manuka honey-colored tiles.
A view from the lounge into the converted study furnished with a vintage midcentury sideboard.
Handmade fish-scale tiles line the wall over the bath.
The main bathroom was remodeled and enlarged. Instead of chrome, Megan opted for hardware with a soft pewter finish.
An art deco drinks trolley was repurposed as a bathroom vanity. All fixtures are low-flow.
A gas space heater provides zoned heating in the extension; recycled deco double doors can be closed to contain heat in the lounge.
Locally made furnishings were used throughout. The living room is furnished with a second-hand Jardan couch, a copper and teak coffee table and artwork from various Australian artists. The cushions were made with custom printed fabrics from Ink and Spindle.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.