1,271 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

On a rustic strip of coastline near Puerto Escondido, Mexico, S-AR designed a beach getaway with an open concrete grid that frames its natural surroundings.
Michael and Christina Hara sided the exterior of the backyard studio with shingles made of Hardie board that they painted a deep purple. “We wanted an exterior cladding that was durable, low-maintenance, and relatively DIY-friendly,” says Michael. “The fish-scale shape popped because it was unique, quirky, and not super serious.”
From prefab pods to cozy cabins, these backyard offices make working from home a breeze.
At night, it is easy to see how the volume at the north end of the site is stacked with the library and a private deck above, and the en suite guest bedroom below. This is separated from the rest of the living space by the open garage, offering increased privacy.
The modularity of the home’s construction is referenced in the grid-like windows. These large areas of glazing allow the home to be filled with natural light.
A concrete block tower in the garden beside the home contains a water tank and solar heating boiler with a shower below.
The metal roof and external walls are constructed from double-layered metallic roofing tiles, which were chosen for their durability against the elements.
The home requires very little maintenance and features a lightweight construction. The modularity of the design also helped to avoid excessive material waste during construction.
The clients are a husband and wife with grown children who no longer live at home. The husband is a psychoanalyst, and the wife is a history teacher at a middle school in São Paulo. During construction of the home, very little earthwork was needed, as the residence nestles into the sloped site to preserve the flat part of the site for a garden of native trees and shrubs.
The exterior of the home features warm blackbutt timber cladding and crisp black metalwork. Each level of the home opens out to a deck or balcony, and the curved white balustrade outside the main bedroom is a contemporary take on the original architecture.
Top 10 Sustainable Homes of 2020: From a carbon-negative cabin to a prefab farmhouse, these resourceful designs captivated readers this year.
The trilevel home spills onto a grassy knoll that overlooks the Hollywood Hills and Downtown Los Angeles.
A Genesis GV80 sits in front of the deep-set, two-story garage of the Foust Residence.

Preproduction model with optional features shown.
The concrete-heavy entrance is softened by the green landscaping.
Preproduction model with optional features shown.
The original heritage exterior was kept, given its ornate detailing.
The exposed concrete framework cantilevers dramatically from the stone walls.
"In a sense, we treated earth as one of our materials," says Vaitsos. "We figured out how much earth we needed to excavate in order to position this house here. And then we used it to transform the landscape a little bit." This was done to create as little waste as possible.
Each cell denotes a different area inside the house below it and is planted with a different species of aromatic plant from which essential oils can be extracted. The landscaped roof also helps to insulate the home and blend it into the environment.
The circular insertions are custom operable skylights that allow for daylighting and passive cooling.
The Orchard Corral is just below the house, and is home to a large grove of olive trees for olive oil and white wine production. Many of the island restaurants serve the olive oil.
A house in Sydney combats climate change with its own ecosystem.
Silvano Zamò, third-generation winemaker at Le Vigne di Zamò winery, and his wife Brigitte tasked architecture firm GEZA with a holiday home on a hilltop location in the tiny northern Italian village of Camporosso, not far from the ski resort Monte Lussari.
On a steep, forested, nearly 30-degree slope adjacent to a ski run and lodge north of Lake Tahoe, Greg Faulkner, founder of Faulkner Architects, spent multiple years working on this contemporary family cabin. The roof "tilts up to the mountains and down to the valley like a visor, while the main home mirrors the ski run to the east side of the property, so the home has a central axis that runs up through it," he says. During the winter, one can ski directly into the living room, with its inset fireplace and 17-foot-high ceilings.
Home Studio by Manuel Cervantes Estudio #DwellDesignAwards2020
Niki Bergen and two of her children run up the hill by the guesthouse she and her partner, Andrew Zuckerman, built on their upstate New York property. The structure was designed by Levenbetts, the architecture firm also responsible for the older main house nearby.
The Western red cedar siding is covered in Cutek “Grey Mist” stain.
Accoya batten sliding screens cover the openings to better keep the interiors cool. “The streetscape to the front comprises an ad hoc mix of late Victorian and interwar dwellings, expressed in the design through the upper level’s angled walls and shifting roof form,” says Fox.
A photovoltaic roof array supplies 92% of the home’s electricity usage, with future plans to increase those capabilities with battery storage. There are also systems for rainwater harvesting and greywater recycling.
“We love geometry—we believe it can help us to establish an order between ourselves and nature,” explain Vietnam-based Gerira Architects.
The front fence is made from sandblasted stainless-steel rods coated in a protective penetrating sealer. The fence is cantilevered out from a concrete beam below the garden, and the gate retracts into an underground pit. “It’s the first of its type in Australia,” says architect Tony Vella. “It was a work of precision to have these thin rods slide down into the ground through 30mm holes.”
The home incorporates a number of sustainable features. Glass walls are protected by concrete eave overhangs and automated external sun blinds. In addition, the heavily insulated walls, floors, and ceiling (with roof garden layers) add to the efficient energy performance of the home.
The home is located across from one of Melbourne’s bay beaches, and it needed to easily accommodate the family’s regular beach visits. “From morning swims to summer days on the beach, the home is intrinsically connected to the sun, water, and sand,” says architect Tony Vella.
A window breaks up the street-facing facade composed of perforated cement blocks.
Tasked with creating a new home in the middle of Hanoi, Vietnam, ODDO Architects sought to incorporate essentials—like plenty of natural light and ventilation.
Natale and Caleb Ebel’s home in the Silverlake neighborhood of Los Angeles was built in 1922. It has 2 bedrooms/2 baths upstairs, and there’s 1 bedroom/1 bath on the lower level, which can work as a separate private suite for family from out-of-town, or a studio for the couple.
Levenbetts designed the guesthouse as a porous block. Every side opens to the outdoors, allowing the landscape to continue through the building. “The idea was to create this total openness and informality and almost undomesticated domestic space,” says architect David Leven. The concrete is textured by its forms on the outside but smooth where it cuts into the building—“almost as though you sliced into it with a knife,” Leven adds.
A vegetable garden is on top of the structure. Placing the garden up a flight of stairs—the form of which shapes one of the house’s openings— protects its plantings from hungry fauna.
The windows and doors feature an extruded aluminum-clad exterior that is finished with a durable 70% PVDF fluoropolymer coating in a Rustic color. The look is contrasted by light-colored stone covering the poolside patio.
The island home occupies a mountainside lot overlooking the beach and water. The construction utilized indigenous materials as much as possible, including fossilized coral, local volcanic stone, bamboo, and Wallaba wood shingles.
The home’s window coverings are housed in recessed window pelmets, while deep blade walls and reveals disguise window frames and transition points.
Rammed earth forms a series of deep blade walls around full-height openable windows to the north. These walls also partially conceal the view of the neighboring fence.
The home aims to reduce long-term operating costs through the use of solar power and energy-efficient appliances, resulting in lower energy bills. Carefully considered niches and deep reveals throughout allow the sun to reach the concrete ground floor slab in winter—and help moderate heat in the summer.
“We designed deep reveals, wide niches, and restrained forms to reduce the built scale of the new home,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “The large panes of glass reflect the surrounding trees like a bush billabong.”
“I love the idea of hidden gems and an element of surprise,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “In this project, the application of a consistent material across the front facade provides ambiguity; the front door is clad in the same timber as the walls and doesn’t have a door handle. It is a quirky element that lends the opening of the door a sense of drama.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.