1138 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Aranza de Ariño and Claudio Sodi gave the architects at S-AR carte blanche to design their 850-square-foot beach retreat. The studio delivered an open structure that frames its natural surroundings.
The house is a glass box that appears to float over the highest point in Bilzen, Belgium. The subterranean bedrooms are cut into a knoll, a move inspired by the hilly region’s roads, which were traditionally dug into the landscape.
“We proposed a rule in the beginning that the architects would have complete liberty in their design,” says resident Claudio Sodi.
Aranza de Ariño and Claudio Sodi gave the architects at S-AR carte blanche to design their 850-square-foot beach retreat.
“A conglomeration of boxes around a bit of a pitched roof” is how Mark describes his transformation of the 1920s Los Angeles bungalow. Inverting the traditional layout, he set the private rooms in the front and a large, open living area in the rear.
Sustainable solutions are integrated throughout. A 40,000-liter rainwater tank is connected to all indoor taps and toilets, and gray water from laundry is recycled for garden irrigation.
A bridge connects the home’s two volumes, which are divided between private and public spaces. The private spaces are protected through a series of screens and shading devices, while the main public living spaces are fluidly open to the outdoors.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
The architects wanted material imperfections to reflect the building process, telling a story about the home’s construction and form. At the ground level, the concrete takes on a more rugged aesthetic in keep with the wild terrain.
A two-story, timber volume holds the private areas while a one-story concrete pavilion is more social and communal. Large openings blend indoor and outdoor spaces while allowing coastal breezes to become part of the home environment.
A launch pad for the homeowner’s adventurous lifestyle, Wallis Lake House has an outdoor shower at the lower-level entry so Adam can rinse off before he steps inside.
In the daytime, the Polygal system pulls in soft, natural light, while at night there are a rainbow of options. "It has a beautiful quality of natural light during the day—plus it manages UV rays and privacy, and controls glare," says Lori.
One facade features Polygal, a polycarbonate sheet first manufactured in 1970 and now available in various layers, colors, and degrees of transparency. The Polygal used for Trammel House has LED light strips inside, which the Louises play with for holidays and parties.
Jim and Lori Louis’s three-bed, two-bath home in East Dallas came to life because of a unique partnership between the couple and A. Gruppo Architects. "They really listened to our goals, embraced our aesthetic, and honored our budget," says Lori.
“The apparent simplicity of prefabricated systems hides a lot of the preparation effort to make them work,” says Gonçalves.
Each unit has a private entrance on the west side of the building. Half of the units are long-term rentals, while the other half serve the short-term tourist market.
“Designed and licensed as a collective housing building, the project offers individual entrances and complete acoustic separation between the different units," says the firm.
With over 7,500 square feet of space, the flexible ground floor can be used as one large space or subdivided into differently sized rooms.
The living spaces are set back to create space for an outdoor balcony and a roof overhang that protects the interior from unwanted solar gain.
The concrete modules were prefabricated off-site and fitted with insulation, electrical sockets and switches, technical rails, and all mechanical connectors before they were transported to the site for final assembly.
“The shed roof has a very functionalist intention. As a prefab and modular system, Gomos is supposed to be produced in a place and shipped and installed in many different locations,” says Gonçalves. “So we wanted to ensure that it would work well even if it’s assembled in a place with severe rainfall or snow.”
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
The home presents as a simple terrace cottage to the street, however it opens up to a surprising and textural collection of volumes inside. It steps down the gently sloping site toward the western garden, where stairs create small amphitheaters for sitting.
The steel bridge—which echoes the design language of the steel brise soleil—extends from the second-floor study into the rear garden.
The deep brise soleil shades the interior as well and offers privacy from neighboring buildings without compromising the views.
Both the boys' bedroom and family room spill out into the ground floor garden, providing the children with an expanded play area outside of the house.
The two monolithic walls on the north and south sides are integrally colored, steel-troweled plaster. They anchor the home in its site as well as provide privacy from neighboring homes.
The home has large areas of glazing on the east and west facades. Given the small footprint of the home and the open floor plan, the entire interior experiences direct light in the morning and evening.
There is now continuous, stepped landscaping from one home to the next as the buildings and street rise up the hillside.
The Apan prototype comprises five 9.84' x 9.84' modules. Three are set horizontally, and two are stacked together in the rear. The home is designed so it can be affordably expanded by adding additional modules.
“We wanted to give a natural feeling and some color related to the surrounding earth—but we wanted to have a finish that would age well, so we avoided the use of paint on the outside,” explain the architects regarding the home’s pink concrete plaster.
Located on a nine-acre site in Apan, Mexico, PPAA’s modular home is one of 32 low-income housing prototypes that are being studied for potential reproduction on a larger scale. The prototypes were built in 2019, and they are open to the public—along with an adjacent welcome and education center by MOS Architects.
The top of the home can be used as an elevated terrace. “The roof references the vernacular of rural houses, as does the traditional rainwater drainage system,” say the architects.
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
A sequence of steel beams and columns supporting the first-floor addition extend 1.5 meters from the home, creating an outdoor terrace beneath. Clear polycarbonate sheeting is installed between two of the beams, protecting the terrace from rain and sun.
Determining the structural integrity of the original brick dairy was paramount to the design of the new addition perched above. The existing brick walls, footings, and roof structure were all assessed, and steel features prominently in the extension to ensure stability.
The dairy is juxtaposed against the “modern industrial” extension, which is clad in Cemintel Barestone panels. The original facade and windows of the dairy bring a unique character to the project.
This Sydney home was designed to be an emblem for climate-conscious design. Aspiring to create a self-sustaining mini ecosystem, the architect-owner embraced clean and renewable energy with a facade of photovoltaic panels, a garden rooftop, and myriad green details.
The home is located in Martis Camp in Truckee, California, north of Lake Tahoe.
Nestled within a forested site, the home is the perfect getaway for a family and their relatives and friends.
A massive oak tree is the focal point of the communal entry courtyard. The apartments were originally designed by Harwell Hamilton Harris for Thomas Cranfill, an English
professor at The University of Texas at Austin courtyard.
Roger and Mary Downey’s 3,200-square-foot rammed-earth home seems to float next to the forest along the Rio Grande in Corrales, New Mexico. While the home’s design and materials nod to the neighboring adobe farmhouses and agricultural sheds, architect Efthimios Maniatis of Studio eM Design calls them an amalgam of “modern contemporary regionalism,” governed by Roger’s strict mandate for minimalism.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
These steps lead to the rooftop garden. They run alongside the master bathroom, which features a glazed corner detail inspired by Carlo Scarpa's Canova Museum.
A timber boardwalk through the veld grass leads to a 15-meter, reed-filtration lap pool.
The planted grass roofs are a recreation of the landscape that existed before the home was built. They are dynamic landscapes that change with the seasons.
"Wendy and Lukas were looking for a natural, sporty lifestyle and a sustainably designed home," says Daffonchio. "It is always rewarding to see the owners living the lifestyle they had dreamed, and seeing their joy in living the home and its incredible surroundings."
Off-shutter concrete is created by removing the shuttering—normally wooden planks used as a temporary structure to contain setting concrete. "Casting the perfect texture of old wooden planks on the concrete, while getting all the services placed correctly inside the shuttering, was an Herculean task," says Daffonchio.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.