60 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The ground floor of the two-story structure includes a living room, dining room, and three bedrooms—all with en-suite bathrooms. It also features a huge loft area with an additional living space, bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Each level has an outdoor terrace, while the lower terrace has a barbecue.
The only clue to the property's past life are the train tracks which traverse the garden.
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the units range from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms. The generous glazing of the living rooms are set back from the exterior cedar rainscreen, and the rest of the facade is sheathed in metal panels. The ground floor was built onsite, but the upper two floors were prefabricated offsite in a factory.
Daring volumetric distribution creates an intriguing, sculptural form.
The cavern-like space underneath the middle volume serves as a parking area.
The middle volume is the largest and most transparent of the three volumes.
Cabins from around the world
An exterior view of the International-style home.
The stainless steel column is set outboard of the envelope to allow for a corner opening wall system.
The taller mass holds the sleeping spaces, while the living and gathering spaces are located in the lower elements.
In order to take advantage of the sun, the outdoor patio, opening wall system, and lawn were located on the southern side of the residence.
Built with specially-formulated concrete made of volcanic ash, this micro-house in Tokyo maximizes space through vertical construction. 
When Tokyo-based architecture firm Atelier TEKUTO received a brief from their clients to build a distinctive, environmentally-conscious concrete home, they embarked on a two-and-a-half year journey of spacial and material exploration. Built in 2015, the result—the R Torso C project—recently won the Overall Excellence Award and first place in the low-rise buildings category at the 2017 American Concrete Institute Awards.
Living room at night
Chenery Facade
Chenery Facade
Architect Joaquin Castillo blends inexpensive materials, the odd splurge, and a refined modernist sensibility to create an affordable weekend house for brothers Alfredo and Guillermo Oropeza. The facade is a juxtaposition of rough-hewn local stone, smooth concrete, glass, and steel—the material palette used throughout the structure.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
A concrete box.
A shell of concrete in the desert
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
The house uses solar panels and water tanks to function off the grid. Its waste water is recycled and used for irrigation.
The cement exterior walls were painted in a dark color to blend in with the forest. Aluminum window frames add some texture to the facade.
Located on a steep site with limited suitable building ground, the firm decided to cantilever the home over the hillside, which has the effect of helping the structure blend in with the landscape.
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Wein House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Custom river red gum sliding windows and australian cypress door.
Northern elevation; Australian Cypress, concrete, and river red gum.
The Brain is a 14,280 cubic-foot cinematic laboratory where the client, a filmmaker, can work out ideas. Physically, a garage—that neighborhood birthplace of invention—provides the conceptual model. The form is essentially a cast-in-place concrete box, intended to be a strong yet neutral background that provides complete flexibility to adapt the space at will. Inserted into the box along the north wall is a steel mezzanine. All interior structures are made using raw hot-rolled steel sheets. Photo by Marco Prozzo.
For Bruce Shafer and Carol Horst's vacation home in the Tehachapi Mountains, architect Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig chose materials suited to the harsh climate.
Tehachapi Mountains, California
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Designed Californian architects Swatt Miers, these three tea houses on a private property were conceived as spaces outside the main home that would be free from the distractions of Internet, telecommunications and television. The largest of the three pavilions is used as a workspace, the second as a bedroom, and the third as a meditation pavilion.
Casa ai Pozzi makes a bold statement on the mountainous shores of Lake Maggiore. The windows that wrap around this concrete villa afford stunning views of the Swiss Alps, and the inverted pyramid that supports the structure subtly mirrors the surrounding mountain peaks.

Photo by: Hélène Binet
The rear of the house looks onto a lush backyard. The rough, industrial prefabricated concrete panels by the German manufacturer Syspro are the building blocks of the home.
The plan is simple: Two rectangles are connected by a bridge that traverses a desert wash. The effect of the light shining into the glass-walled living room is what first attracted Sette and Shikany to the house.
Challenged by the dimensions of the narrow lot, the team worked through significant programmatic and logistical constraints during the design and construction process. The final concept for the layout was a modern take on the side hall plan. The living spaces are stretched back deep into the lot, and strategically raised above grade to allow sunlight to penetrate into multiple living spaces. The multifunctional courtyard serves as outdoor workspace, gardening area, children's play area, and covered parking during winter months.
Cabin Knapphullet is small cabin inspired by its location nestled between large rocks and low vegetation of the Sandefjord coast in Norway. It is only 323 square feet, but contains an open living space with a bathroom and a mezzanine bed that sleeps two people. Although the building occupies a small footprint, the space expands vertically over four levels including a roof terrace.
Teeland Architects designed this modern home on Australia’s Sunshine Coast in order to maximize views of the Pacific Ocean to the east as well as the surrounding forest to the north.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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