411 Exterior Concrete Siding Material House Design Photos And Ideas

The existing driveway was rerouted to a lower elevation, and the garage tucked underground so as not to detract from the surrounding views.
A cantilevered roof mitigates solar heat gain.
The home was built atop a cleared knoll.
Stone walls, made with rock excavated on site, frame the ascent with cement steps.
The home at night.
The pines to the west of the home provide protection from the wind.
The upper volume is clad in stained black cedar, while the lower volume is built with concrete.
Photovoltaic panels have been installed on the sloped, south-facing volume.
The architects have installed ample glazing along the south facade, particularly on the lower level, to take advantage of solar gain in the winter. The concrete floors also help retain heat.
Spaced-out pavers are laid down on the slope leading away from the east-facing veranda.
An aerial view of Casa Terra clearly shows how the various rooms branch out from the central circulation axis.
Lush greenery surrounds Casa Terra to make the building feel like an extension of the landscape.
An inorganic pigment was added to the cement mix to give the board-formed concrete walls its reddish hue.
The massive roof was constructed from glue-laminated timber.
Casa Gaz seen at night with a closed entrance gate.
Casa Gaz stands out from its neighbors with its facade clad in vertical timber.
Concrete walls dominate the ground floor, while the first floor is clad in Ipe. "The upper-level white walls and Ipe wood ceiling gives the same contrast, but in a more peaceful way for the sleeping quarters," Gracia notes.
"One first encounters the refined folded steel gutter, and transitions along the entry deck as the project unfolds toward the rear," said the architects. "Offset against the heavy blade walls, the roof canopy is simple and refined as it tapers to a point and allows the folded steel gutter to cut a sharp silhouette against the undulating roof forms of the adjoining buildings."
The thin roof extends over the east side of the entry hall, while a series of skylights allow natural light to pass through. The entrance is on the west side of the glazed entrance.
The steel-framed glazed living pavilion is partly clad in wood and sits atop CMU walls.
"The east façade reveals these distinct parts of the house—the grounded bedroom volume to the north, the glass hallway, which offers a glimpse to otherwise secluded outdoor spaces, and the living pavilion that is lifted above the site to view the forest and pond," the team adds.
The "living pavilion" on the southern wing is elevated to make the space level with the home.
The private bedroom and service rooms are located at the northern street corner and are clad in concrete masonry units.
Ogosta used staggered board-form concrete site walls to raise the house above the street level.
Thanks to a complete revamp, this midcentury gem now has a fresh new look.
Although Silver did not follow the original footprint exactly, the new layout was clearly inspired by Hemenway's design.
The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
A staff worker tends to the grass roof.
The sheet metal roof and wood cladding of the new structure complements the smooth, shiny birch tree barks on the site.
In winter, the extension looks as if it’s covered in snow.
The new addition consists of a white prism that rests atop a concrete pedestal.
The house contains four bedrooms, one of which is presently being converted into an office.
The decades-old mango tree informed the arrangement of the home.
The concrete cladding contrasts with warm orange teak.
The entry is marked by a thin, cantilevered canopy hovering over the front porch.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
A glimpse at the breathtaking views available from the home.
Set on the lower section of the slope, the second volume has a more modern facade, featuring concrete, steel, and glass materials.
The upper volume—where the garage, kitchen, service areas, two bathrooms, and a patio are located—is a half-submerged body of stone set within the upper section of the slope.
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
Passersby seeing its parged gray plaster facade would have no clue that the second story of Bret and Dani Stone’s home is made mostly of shipping containers. A crane stacked the units on top of the concrete-and-steel superstructure in a single day in late 2016. Architects Clay Aurell and  Josh Blumer, veterans of the medium, sourced the recycled boxes from cor10 Studios.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
Front view of the FlatPak House in Minneapolis, Minnesota. When the architect first told his wife about his idea, she said, “It’s about time you focus on a house for me!” He continues, “It’s like the old story about the cobbler whose kids have no shoes.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.