191 Exterior Concrete Siding Material House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Built as part of a functional farmhouse, the original building's ground floor was used to store food and animals, a situation that didn't exactly call for expansive views or large amounts of natural light. Vieira da Silva maintained a similar layout over the two-story home, with social areas on the upper floor and bedrooms on the ground floor, but opened up the lower level with large windows. "With the pre-existing stone walls we created patios, keeping a distance [between the walls] so we could have big openings, and create a close and intense relationship with the landscape and the ruin itself."
Architect Bruno Despierre built a deck for outdoor activities from pine wood.
SIERRA LEONA
SIERRA LEONA
SIERRA LEONA
SIERRA LEONA
Skylab Architecture cantilevered the living volumes in order to minimize the building’s footprint and to create a tree house-like experience for the residents.
The exterior use of desert masonry is another signature Wright feature.
Signature Wright details include the homes' integration into the nature of the site.
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Wein House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Torcuato House Pavilion - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Torcuato House Pavilion - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
exterior from base of hill
The front of the house at night. An exterior stairway alongside the carport leads to the home’s main entrance.
A family in Hamburg, Germany, turned a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a few exterior tricks, including sheathing the exterior in one-dimensional, murdered-out black.
Twenty-two 12-foot-wide steel-frame modules were combined to form nine to 14-foot-high rooms that were stacked and bolted together. Ten deck modules added more than 4,700 square feet of sheltered outdoor space. Image courtesy of Jill Paider.
North facade - the framed box
Cor-Ten steel and board-form concrete give the exterior a weathered look.
Ramirez and his partner, Sarah Mason Williams, dine at a sequoia table by Redwood Burl next to a hulking juniper tree that they asked the architects to preserve as a centerpiece of the property.
Street Entrance
Main Volume
SIERRA LEONA
Custom river red gum sliding windows and australian cypress door.
Northern elevation; Australian Cypress, concrete, and river red gum.
The Brain is a 14,280 cubic-foot cinematic laboratory where the client, a filmmaker, can work out ideas. Physically, a garage—that neighborhood birthplace of invention—provides the conceptual model. The form is essentially a cast-in-place concrete box, intended to be a strong yet neutral background that provides complete flexibility to adapt the space at will. Inserted into the box along the north wall is a steel mezzanine. All interior structures are made using raw hot-rolled steel sheets. Photo by Marco Prozzo.
A combination home and photographer’s studio, the Studio House is an exploration of memories and their potential to resonate over time. Remnant landscape elements, building geometries and materials from the previous home on the site reappear in the new building. These fragments act as artifacts that recall earlier times. The two-story living room/studio has a curved roof that serves as a large reflector for diffusing natural and artificial light. Details, such as the stairs, fireplace, light fixtures and hardware, are made of metal and reflect the owner’s interests in art and craftsmanship. Photo by Paul Warchol.
exterior
Another 1956 tract house with a flat roof designed by Krisel.
Street Entrance Facade
New addition at rear of house framing the original house and interior areas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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